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Paper Mold and Deckle #4: More on the deckle joint

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Blog entry by mileskimball posted 05-19-2013 06:08 PM 1899 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Mold Redux; or, the difference between prototyping and screwing up Part 4 of Paper Mold and Deckle series no next part

To understand the deckle joint, I drew it first in Sketchup. Here’s how it looks, apart and assembled:

After assembly, I used a rounderover bit to take an arc out of the outside corners.

-- Miles



6 comments so far

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mileskimball

97 posts in 1474 days


#1 posted 05-21-2013 01:59 PM

Forgot to include a shot of the finished
joint…

It came out pretty well. I used a tenoning jig for some cuts, then cleaned up by hand. The sliding dovetail was all by hand.

-- Miles

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JanPo

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#2 posted 03-04-2016 03:37 PM

Hello Mileskimball

Sorry for contacting you this way. I came across you blog when searching online for paper making molds. We have little paper making studio where we show children how to make paper in far away Slovakia :-). Currently trying to make or supply new papermaking mold. Was wondering whether you can share the way you made the metal mesh for your mold? Or could it be supplied from somewhere?
Thank You
Jan

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mileskimball

97 posts in 1474 days


#3 posted 03-04-2016 05:35 PM

Hi, Jan -

If you want a traditional laid paper mold, with chain lines, you may choose (as I did) to make the mesh yourself. I wasn’t able to find anyone who would do it for less than $2000 (!).

If you could send me an email address, I can share with you some photos and a short framentary video of the loom I made. It’s a tedious process – kind of like weaving by hand or knitting.

Essentially, you need two kinds of wire: phosphor bronze and steel fishing wire. Phosphor bronze is hard to source, but I was able to find some eventually. Steel fishing wire is used for trotlines to fish for big fish like sturgeon. I can’t recall the thickness of either, unfortunately.

You cut the PB wire into suitable lengths, but then if it came in a loop of wire, you’ll need to straighten them as much as possible. I actually made a wire straightening jig, which used offset pulleys to bend the wire against its bend from the loop, gradually straightening it. I had no luck with a common technique, which is essentially to yank and stretch the wire straight. It just broke. If I had it to do over again, I’d pay a little more to have the wire straightened for me. Typically a steel or metal supplier will have the equipment to straighten the wire and cut it into suitable lengths.

Then you set up a frame with screws in a row at the top – about 3 cm apart – to locate the chainlines. You take some fishing wire – about 7x longer than the desired depth of the screen – fold it in half, then wrap each end onto a spool, so you have two spools holding half of each piece of wire. At the middle point, you wrap the wire around one of the screws and use the spools to twist the wire around itself 3-5 times. Continue along until you have one wire and two spools for each screw. Lay one spool from each screw away from you, and the other toward you. Lay a piece of the PB wire in the weft between the two ends of all the wires, then one wire at a time, pull to spool that’s away from you toward you, and the spool that’s toward you away from you. Cinch the twist, but not too tightly – you don’t want to break the wire. Once you’ve twisted all of the fishing wires around the first PB wire, go back and make sure everything is snug. Then lay in another PB wire and repeat.

Hope this helps -

Miles

-- Miles

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mileskimball

97 posts in 1474 days


#4 posted 03-04-2016 05:43 PM

Actually, I was able to find a way to make an album and share the link:

https://www.dropbox.com/sc/lqrqb9o09e0bvgj/AACs-W1QXH9yXhMflPFpLTNKa

-- Miles

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mileskimball

97 posts in 1474 days


#5 posted 03-05-2016 01:50 PM

A few afterthoughts:

You might notice that on the loom I’ve drawn some lines down from each screw. These gave me a sight line to make sure the chain lines stay relatively straight. It’s easy to let them go off course. I found that a cheap plastic hair comb made a good tool for nudging the chain wires straight, which I’d do every few lines.

As you twist the chain wire around the laid PB wires (pulling one spool toward you and the other away), be sure to twist them always in the same direction (clockwise or counterclockwise) for consistency.

The PB wires tended to sag in the middle of the loom, so I inserted a small block of wood loosely to support them.

To wrap the spools with wire:
1. Drill a small transverse hole – 1mm – in each spool.
2. Drill a larger hole in the end of each spool, sized to friction-fit a short piece of ~6mm dowel.
3. Chuck one end of the dowel in a drill, and press a spool onto the other end.
4. Poke a wire-end through the small transverse hole.
5. Hold the wire in light tension, then use the drill to spool the wire. Go slowly!
6. When you approach the screw anchoring your fishing line, stop and wrap the spool with a rubber band to hold the wire in place. This also allows you to feed out more wire as you need it in the weaving process.

-- Miles

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JanPo

2 posts in 273 days


#6 posted 03-07-2016 10:55 AM

Hi Mileskimball

Thank You for your exhausting answer and sharing your know how with us. Let me say I admire your patience. I guess this is the only way you can do these things these days. There used to be people with professional looms however all these crafts are now more or less gone.
I found this interesting dvd: http://iarecordings.org/productions/p20.html
I’ll keep you posted it if I decide to go and make the mesh myself using your way :-)

Here is our private email: petruspapier@gmail.com or you can see few pictures from our workshop here:
https://www.facebook.com/Petrus-Papier-Exkurzie-do-papierne-a-ru%C4%8Dne-vyr%C3%A1ban%C3%BD-papier-219406638144380/

Once again Thank You
Jan

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