LumberJocks

Old planes

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Kathy posted 1489 days ago 2682 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch


After a very frustrating day in the shop I decided to do some cleaning up and found these old planes. I believe the Victor belonged to my grandfather. It’s possible the Companion one did also but it may be newer than that. I am not at all sure where we got that one.

I was able to find some info online about the Victor and it appears it is quite old. Looking up the Companion I got all kinds of crazy stuff on being a companion. Not what I was looking for!

Any tips on how to refurbish these to be usable would be great. Or should I just leave them alone?

I also found all of these files and rasps? Not sure what any of them are used for. Do any of them sharpen a plane?

Okay, I am going to post this but I am not at all confident that the pictures will actually show up!!!

-- curious woodworker



11 comments so far

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1396 posts in 2090 days


#1 posted 1489 days ago

Nice find. these should be useful if tuned and sharpened well. I havent encountered these brands before, but they look similar to Craftsman and Stanley models from the early-mid 20th century.

for a start check out these sites:
http://liutaiomottola.com/Tools/Plane.htm
http://www.woodcentral.com/bparticles/plane_tune.shtml

there are lots of others too. the basic process is making sure everything is clean, as rust free as you care to get it, flat, square, and sharp. the rest is details!

the files and rasps are useful for shaping wood, but they aren’t useful for setting up a handplane – unless you want to carve and shape a new handle.

View Joe Watson's profile

Joe Watson

315 posts in 2172 days


#2 posted 1488 days ago

all it takes is to remove rust from the plane flatten the soles and sharpen the blades. I have refreshed several for use now. i have used two methods equally well for rust removal. first is evaporust its nontoxic and removes rust well. second is to use a wire brush on a grinder motor to brush the rust away. with the last method its advised to use eye protection. then get some aluminum oxide adhesive backed sand paper on a flat surface like a tablesaw to flatten the sole. you need to sharpen and hone the irons on them all you really need is sand paper and a sharpening jig however i prefer sharpening stones. you have to establish the primary bevel if there are nicks etc. also remove the paint from the chip breaker on the victor.

victor planes were a company founded by leonard baily, the same bailey stanley bailey planes were named after. he left stanley and founded the company then stanley later bought the brand. yours is probably a stanley victor made by stanley under the victor name.

I havent heard of the companion so many plane companies. some of which were made by other companies. mainly only 4 companies made planes and the others were made by those companies. millers falls stanley sargent and union. union was purchased later by stanley as well. but your companion plane has a sargent style lateral adjuster. i would guess it was a sargent made plane for companion.

another good reference is www.rexmill.com

-- Got Wood?

View Shopsmithtom's profile

Shopsmithtom

780 posts in 2821 days


#3 posted 1488 days ago

there were a ton of budget planes in the marketplace years ago & Companion was probably one f them. Some of them are worth your time to refurbish & some are not, although I think all of them are at least as good as the cheap planes you can buy today. I’d probably not spend too much time on the Companion because some of those planes did not have as accurate machining between the base & the frog to make for accurate adjustments. The Victor is basically a low to mid grade Stanley and, once tuned, will serve you well.

Here’s a great site for reference. http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan1.htm

Here’s another specific to your plane: http://www.handplane.com/stanley-victor-no-1105-jack-plane

Good luck on everything. -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1396 posts in 2090 days


#4 posted 1488 days ago

Those are some good links – I knew about Patrick’s B&G, but not the others. thanks for posting those.

A good thing to do with those older budget planes is use them as roughing or scrub planes. They may not be precise enough for other work, but if you start with rough lumber then you can use a budget plane to begin the stock preparation process without having to use a higher-quality plane on rough wood. I have a no-name brand plane that I got in a 2-for-1 deal and decided to keep it because its small, light, and holds an edge well enough for it to be my go-to plane for basic stock prep – like knocking off enough of the high spots on a board before putting the whole thing through my electric planer. that sort of thing. obviously you don’t need many of those, but they’re not completely worthless either.

finally, another thing you can try is salvaging the blade to use in a plane of your own making – such as making a really simple chisel plane.

View swirt's profile

swirt

1937 posts in 1598 days


#5 posted 1488 days ago

I agree with Aaron. Tune the Victor and keep the companion for use on less than ideal wood. Useful for cleaning up exterior handrails that have gotten rough or checks, or using it as the first few passes on a piece of wood that may have some dirt on. Consider it a pawn plane … as in a pawn in a game of chess that you can sacrifice.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Kathy's profile

Kathy

210 posts in 1548 days


#6 posted 1488 days ago

Use them? LOL well I have been playing with them and it isn’t as easy as it looks!! I bought a cheap little plane (a small Stanley) because I didn’t have one and had no idea how to use it. I still don’t!

I can see that it is going to take a lot of practice to learn this skill. I am hoping that when I get back to tech school in the fall that they have the equipment to sharpen and some advice on refurbishing these oldies.

I like to think that my grandpa had his hands on the red one. I remember watching him work in his shop when I was a little girl. Maybe that is where my woodworking journey began.

I have an old library table from his shop. I refinished it and it is beautiful but it still has the holes where he attached his vise.

-- curious woodworker

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1396 posts in 2090 days


#7 posted 1488 days ago

kathy – the first step is sharpening them. once you get the blades sharpened (and I mean razor sharp), back the blade out so that it doesn’t take a cut at all. then slowly, gradually, feed more blade through until you can make a shaving. the rest of the tuning process is just that – fine tuning to be able to make accurate cuts and leave a clean surface behind. 90% of the way there is making sure it’s extremely sharp.

View Shopsmithtom's profile

Shopsmithtom

780 posts in 2821 days


#8 posted 1487 days ago

I agree that sharpening is the key. Along with that is just practice…make shavings. I’ve made a lot of shavings from wood that will never be a project. I’m a lot better now than when I started, but can always get better. Sometimes I go to the shop & make shavings just to make shavings. It’s kind of like therapy. The sound that a sharp plane makes is very relaxing. By the way, that’s a beautiful German Shepherd. -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View swirt's profile

swirt

1937 posts in 1598 days


#9 posted 1487 days ago

Sometimes I go to the shop & make shavings just to make shavings.
Here I thought I was the only one that does that.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View BigTiny's profile

BigTiny

1664 posts in 1514 days


#10 posted 1442 days ago

Google “scary sharp system” to find out how to put an edge on that plane that puts a razor to shame.

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

View Kathy's profile

Kathy

210 posts in 1548 days


#11 posted 1440 days ago

I haven’t gone back to these yet. I got some chisels and have been trying to keep them sharp and learn how to use them. Funny how they are sharp enough to cut my finger though!!!!

-- curious woodworker

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase