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Stickley Library Desk #503 #2: Panel Glue-up

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Blog entry by markg11cdn posted 12-08-2016 08:00 PM 746 reads 0 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Getting Started Part 2 of Stickley Library Desk #503 series no next part

The top of the desk calls for a solid wood glue-up. I dug through the pile of stock and tried to pick the nicest pieces with the best grain / fleck. Next, I did the usual prep for a panel glue-up. Plane it to height – 15/16”, joint one edge then rip to width.

Next, I lined everything up on my workbench and drew parallel lines across all the boards. Those lines were used to cut biscuits to help with alignment during the glue-up.

Next was the glue-up. I evenly spread the clamps across the panel, alternating them from the top and bottom of the panel to help keep it flat.

After the glue set for a bit, I used an old chisel to peel the glue off before it hardened. The next day I removed it form the clamps and used the sliding table on my tablesaw to cut it to length. I didn’t get the panels quite lined up, so I had to do a fair bit of sanding with a belt sander, followed by a random orbital sander to get it finished up.

Next I did this 3 more times. I couldn’t source any 3/4” white oak plywood locally, so I went with solid panels for the shelves on desk. Very tedious and time-consuming. Next time I’ll make the trip to get the plywood and skip the extra glue-ups.

Now to work on the two side shelves of the desk. The two shelf pieces were cut from a single glued up panel so the grain would match and also to save a bit of time.

The desk top has end grain showing, but for the two shelves I wanted to have the end-grain covered. For that I milled a tongue on one end of the bottom shelf, to be matched up with a corresponding dado in the breadboard to cover the edge. Here’s a picture of tongue on the shelf (bottom) and the breadboard with the dado (which will be ripped into two pieces). The ends of the breadboard will be covered by the legs of the finished desk.

I glued up the trim board just in the center of the panel, to leave room for the panel to expand and contract.

The back of that lower shelf got a dado cut on the table saw as well. That will receive the back shelf panel which of course got a corresponding tongue.

Now that the panels are all done, it’s time to move on to the more interesting parts of the build.



3 comments so far

View dannmarks's profile

dannmarks

603 posts in 703 days


#1 posted 12-09-2016 12:02 AM

Very nice work Mark. Gluing up; I do as you lining up. However, for cleaning the glue up I scrap it while it is wet letting it pile up on the putty knife. Then I take a damp towel and wipe it clean. This leaves almost nothing to sand at all. I have never had the glue do anything like draw out of joint either. If your boards are not too wide you can always run the board back through the plainer for one last pass after it has set a day so to so then there is nothing to clean at all and sanding is even more perfect.

This is just how I do it. What you were doing worked for you very well. Can’t wait to see the final product.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5741 posts in 2935 days


#2 posted 12-09-2016 12:17 AM

Wow I am confused by those last two pictures. I don’t have an overall sense for the plan like you do either.
So the shelves are trimmed out like a breadboard I guess. But the grooves are through grooves, and the tenon stops short of the corner? Is there a plug that fills it later, or does it not show in the finished desk?

I love arts and crafts projects, and working with white oak. Hope your project comes out great.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View markg11cdn's profile

markg11cdn

17 posts in 2370 days


#3 posted 12-09-2016 01:40 PM


Wow I am confused by those last two pictures. I don t have an overall sense for the plan like you do either.
So the shelves are trimmed out like a breadboard I guess. But the grooves are through grooves, and the tenon stops short of the corner? Is there a plug that fills it later, or does it not show in the finished desk?

Sorry, you’re right, I forgot to include a picture of the finished desk in the first post. I went back and added it there and also added another picture here to try and make things a bit more clear.

The ends of the breadboard are covered up by the legs of the desk.

cheers – mark

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