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Travel blogs #5: Knife sheaths (Turkey adventures)

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Blog entry by mafe posted 10-03-2016 09:03 PM 1192 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Turkey adventures - summer 2016 Part 5 of Travel blogs series no next part

Leather work
A few sheaths I made in Turkey this summer

I did say I did almost no woodworking, but I did mange to make a little leather working in the shadow during some of the warm days, besides making the divan.
Of course I had time for Turkish coffee and good cognac, especially when I could share it with my better half.


Brought with me a few knifes with me to Turkey for the holiday, three of them needed sheaths and before I left Denmark, I made the leather part and pre drilled the holes so I only needed to bring sewing gear and a few other things.


So it was just to get going with the sewing.
As so often before I use my favourite clamp.


Also found out that a dustpan is a super cool holder while sewing.


Like this both hands are free for double stitching.


That’s it three knifes got sheaths.


Same idea, different ways.


To make a perfect fit to the knifes, the sheaths were soaked in warm water with a wee baking soda.


Patience and coffee.


The blades are given a thin layer of grease and then wrapped in cling film.
Like this they will not rust and the wood not be damaged by the water.


Then fitted in the sheath.


Yes they all fit fine, even they are tight now when wet.


Now time for more tobacco and compressing the leather.
This is hard work.


Please notice how I sweat!
Working in this heat is quite a challenge.


I use a home made tool, made it from a piece of antler, this is hard but not too hard and then smooth.


The leather are compressed and pushed into the shape.
Patters can also be made like this.


The backside also.


The more you compress the stronger and stiffer a sheath.


Pause.
Now they just need to dry, in this heat that’s not a big issue.


And I can cool down with a gin tonic.


Now dry and I guess it’s clear to see the difference from before the compressing.


The sheaths now get leather grease, this will protect them and keep the leather alive.


I also like to give them hardener, this makes then get this wonderful crisp sound, almost as if they were made of wood.


Even here in the summer, it can be handy with a flash light.
Perhaps dear Filiz should hold the light and not the camera…


But no complaints when she brings tea.


That’s it!
Three knifes got sheaths.


Not all happy with the drilling I did for the stitching but it’s ok.
The sides will be trimmed on a sander back in Copenhagen.


This one I call: small fish.
Made a knife for Filiz in the shape of a fish and then this one as I was at it.


This one is: The pirates knife: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/107604
A replica of a knife my forefather the pirate made.


Finally the: Stanley 5.5 blade knife: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/103520
This one I made when I visited Jamie in Scotland, his friend Ron and I had a great time together, transforming a old Stanley blade into knifes.


So thanks for watching, perhaps not a real wood blog, but making these sheaths are a important part of the knife making and therefore I think it is worth sharing.

By the way I’m back in Turkey soon, just for a short visit, wonder if the Jawa missed me…

If you want to learn more about my process of making a knife and sheath, you can hit this link:
http://www.felding.net/7knifemaking1.html



Hope this can inspirer or just bring a wee smile.

The best of my thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



14 comments so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13715 posts in 2080 days


#1 posted 10-03-2016 09:12 PM

More than a ‘wee smile,’ Mads. Wonderful stuff, loving every picture and description. Thanks for sharing!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Roger's profile

Roger

19867 posts in 2266 days


#2 posted 10-03-2016 10:40 PM

You’re a master at those Mads. Super nice.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View lew's profile

lew

11336 posts in 3217 days


#3 posted 10-03-2016 11:46 PM

Thanks for the wonderful photo journey into sheath making, Mads!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17145 posts in 2567 days


#4 posted 10-04-2016 12:25 AM

That is some very fine leather work, my friend!!

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

5221 posts in 1505 days


#5 posted 10-04-2016 12:30 AM

A great trip into the leather for sheath. I see you are still using your feet.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9432 posts in 3514 days


#6 posted 10-04-2016 01:09 AM

COOL Tips in working with leather!

Unique clamps in use too… Perhaps a Write-up on the Hazards in using them is appropriate? LOL

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View mafe's profile

mafe

11140 posts in 2551 days


#7 posted 10-04-2016 01:10 AM

Here the knife I made for Filiz.

.
Knife no 54 Filiz.


Elm burl, buffalo horn, hand forged blade from old file.
One of my first self forged blades.

(So now I have to sleep with one eye open – lol).

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Druid's profile

Druid

1302 posts in 2257 days


#8 posted 10-04-2016 06:39 AM

Another fun trip. Nicely done Mads.

-- John, British Columbia, Canada

View mafe's profile

mafe

11140 posts in 2551 days


#9 posted 10-05-2016 11:14 AM

Hi ther LJ’s,
Druid, smiles thanks.
Joe, big laugh, as long as I can walk there are no danger in the really traditional clamp type…
doubleDD, after working with Japanese tools I rediscovered the foot clamps versatility, only difference is they use shoes…
Jim J, thank you, I do love working leather, it have many of the qualities of the wood and the smell is priceless.
Lew, thank you back for your kindness.
Roger, I try, trust me, I try. ;-)
Smitty, a vintage smile to you.
Best thoughts and thanks,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View twokidsnosleep's profile

twokidsnosleep

1101 posts in 2436 days


#10 posted 10-05-2016 07:36 PM

I am always a sucker for a leather work posting
The sheathes look great and what a wonderful relaxing vacation pastime
I would be into that gorgeous ocean every half hour if I was sweating up a storm stitching

I am sure you have used a stitching punch before.
A fork works in a pinch as well to at least mark out even spaces for sewing through.
Got some from here and they were reasonable price of good quality
http://goodsjapan.com/pricking-irons--stitch-punches-30-c.asp
Sorry if that makes you want to spend money :)

-- Scott "Some days you are the big dog, some days you are the fire hydrant"

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

5221 posts in 1505 days


#11 posted 10-05-2016 08:30 PM

Foot clamps. LMAO Ha ha

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View mafe's profile

mafe

11140 posts in 2551 days


#12 posted 10-17-2016 10:46 AM

Hi,
twokids, Trust me I spend a lot of time in the water:


Spear hunting.


Trap fishing.

No I never used a stitching punch, when single layer I use a x, when more layers I usually drill, just the way I learned it. Have looked at these and thought it looks fast and easy. Do they work with several layers.
Always happy to learn new and new ways thank you.

doubleDD, ha ha ha ha smiles.

Best thoughts,
mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

11140 posts in 2551 days


#13 posted 10-17-2016 10:50 AM

Ohhh yes and dinner time. ;-)

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9432 posts in 3514 days


#14 posted 10-17-2016 08:03 PM

WOW!

That looked like an octopus… yes?

Do you use a Bow & spear? ... or just throw it by hand?

COOL!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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