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Spoon making in Copenhagen - working green wood

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Blog entry by mafe posted 02-24-2016 08:24 PM 1582 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Spoon making in Copenhagen
working green wood

Green woodworking means working in fresh wood.
This makes cutting and carving a lot easier, but also you need to control the drying so it will not crack and shaping with sandpaper also have to wait until dry or the sand paper will clog up, but you can work with all kinds of cutting tools.


Brought home these two from a walk in the woods.
Had no plan but were thinking spoons so I took one that were really crocked.
(They had trimmed some trees so the wood were on the forest bed).


A wee cutting on the band saw, trying to follow the grain to keep the strength.
As you can see it’s really green woodworking.


Now the sides and we got something looking like a spoon.


Read the wood and just go on.
This should keep me busy for a while.


I give the most dry wood a go first, this was from the thicker branch.
Shaping the bowl of the spoon with a small spoon gauge.
(A wonderful little hand forged tool that can become scary sharp).


Like cutting butter and even the really wet wood are cut relatively easy but I will dry it a day or two in a open plasticbag to reduce the moisture before doing more with that wood.


Water and bread, just like a jail…
Naaaa more like Paradise.


Then it was time to pack up for the day.
Time to get home and cook dinner for my daughter.


Next day shaping the spoon with a knife and a sharp chisel.
Then I ran it a quick tour over a spindle sander.


Before – after.


Time to shape the bowl with a spoon knife.


Then cleaning it up with a small scraper.
These can be made from a old saw blades, made a small blog here: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/79914 .


The handle gets a tour with a card scraper.


Then soaked in raw linseed oil.
Since the wood is not all dry, I will re soak later, but for now it will help it from tristing a cracking.


A swan neck scraper can also be used.


On one of the spoons I leave the handle rough and dip it in a vinegar – steel wool solution, this will color the wood.
(Read more here on the dye http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/57834 ).


Here the spoon after drying a half hour.
I kind of like this as a contrast to some of the more simple versions.
(The knife in front is the one I used for shaping and was the first knife I made my self).


Here the other spoon and a small one for sugar or serving.


I am happy with the result, they will come to use in the kitchen and hopefully help making and serving some wonderful food.
(The rest of the spoons are left for a few days to dry some more now).



Hope it can be a inspiration.

The best of my thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



14 comments so far

View Roger's profile

Roger

19878 posts in 2269 days


#1 posted 02-24-2016 08:29 PM

Very nice. Bring on the ice cream..

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View lew's profile

lew

11340 posts in 3221 days


#2 posted 02-24-2016 08:50 PM

I really like the shape of these, Mads. Mine always look so “neanderthal”

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Brit's profile

Brit

6732 posts in 2308 days


#3 posted 02-24-2016 09:02 PM

What a lovely way to spend a couple of days. Lovely spoons Mads made with wonderful tools.

-- Andy -- "I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free." (Michelangelo)

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

5237 posts in 1508 days


#4 posted 02-24-2016 09:13 PM

Amazing. I would of never thought of using branches like that. Mads, you are very good with your hands. nice work.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1756 posts in 528 days


#5 posted 02-24-2016 10:03 PM

And, he cooks, too.
Question: Raw Linseed Oil? Do you boil it yourownbadself? I understand that can be very hazardous.

-- Mark

View mafe's profile

mafe

11157 posts in 2555 days


#6 posted 02-24-2016 10:35 PM

Hi there,
Roger, ready I am, actually just ate ice cream, so guilty also.
Lew, thanks. Neanderthal sounds nice too, I just followed the wood.
Brit, I can see in your blogs that you of all know this, yes that sure is lovely time spend. For the tools, ohhh yes this is another excuse to make, buy and use wonderful tools.
DoubleDD, get into the woods. ;-)
Markwilson, Yes I cook, but not in linseed oil… smiles.
Raw / boild linseed oil http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=145
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Philip's profile

Philip

1276 posts in 2004 days


#7 posted 02-25-2016 02:37 AM

Great work Mads. The Dye is interesting.

-- I never finish anyth

View bch's profile

bch

287 posts in 2154 days


#8 posted 02-25-2016 03:30 AM

Mads: You say one can make scrapers like this from old blades. What blade would one use to make these? Certainly not old circular saw blades, they are too thick. Please do share. Thanks! Beautiful shapes you came up with from those branches—inspiration for sure.

-- --bch

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#9 posted 02-25-2016 04:19 AM

Very good blog Mads ,really cool spoons.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

8749 posts in 1305 days


#10 posted 02-25-2016 01:03 PM

Very nice spoons, Mads. I like the ebonizing of the handle you did. Thanks for sharing.

-- God bless, Candy

View mafe's profile

mafe

11157 posts in 2555 days


#11 posted 02-28-2016 09:22 PM

Hi,
CFrye, thank you, I think also that will be used again, perhaps even all over to pre age it.
a1Jim, smiles now I will not go hungry to bed. ;-)
bch, I just made some today from a standard saw blade works really fine, will blog soon. Thin blades give more flex and allow you to follow a curve and give the scraper a bend when using it.
Thank you for the fine words.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

11157 posts in 2555 days


#12 posted 03-02-2016 12:01 AM

Small card scrapers can be made from a old saw blades, made a small blog here: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/79914

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2799 days


#13 posted 03-04-2016 01:38 PM

Very nice result Mads. I’m thinking that making these from green wood is a great idea. Items like these would also be easy to dry in the micro wave oven (easy does it). I like your small scraper in the last picture. Altogether nice work and fun to do.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mafe's profile

mafe

11157 posts in 2555 days


#14 posted 03-05-2016 04:13 PM

Thank you Mike, I made a small blog on the scrapers also.
Yes it was fun and relaxing to do.
Best of my thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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