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Axes, adzes and drawknifes #7: Carpenters adze - making a handle.

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Blog entry by mafe posted 05-13-2015 10:18 PM 2616 reads 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Restore an old French axe - handle and care detailed. Part 7 of Axes, adzes and drawknifes series no next part

Carpenters adze
making a handle

I’m not an expert in adzes but after what I have read, this is a carpenters adze du to the shape of the head.
It was a gift from a boat builder some years back.
This is how it got a handle.
In Danish it’s called a: skar √łkse.

I made some study on the web and found it should have a curve towards the cutting edge and that the distance from the end of the handle to the cutting edge and to the handle end should be the same.
The length I made just a wee longer then the distance from the floor to where the hand starts on the arm, perhaps a inch more would be better if you will work long hours with it, since this length take a light back bend, but this is good for me since I can then see what I do and gain control.
I have used it quite a few times, really love this tool, it is a back to basic tool, that I was amazed how accurate I could work with after only a little practice.
Do wear some heavy shoes, work shoes with metal noses are the best.
And no you are not macho doing it bare food.


Would have liked a wee more curve, but the wood I had took the decision for me.
So I sketched up the curve I could get as a maximum on this board.


Then cut the first side on the band saw again reading the grain and correcting the curves a wee bit as I read it.


Now making sure it was wide enough to accept and hold the adze head in place.


Transfer these measures to the wood.
Like this the band saw will have a track to follow.


Also correcting a wee down the handle.


Back to the saw.


Then it was just to start shaping.
(Look in last blog for more details).


Before and after.


Then linseed oil, plenty.


Here it is.


Hope again to be able to share some energy, to perhaps even inspire others to bring some old tools back to life,

Best of thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



9 comments so far

View mafe's profile

mafe

11172 posts in 2557 days


#1 posted 05-13-2015 10:22 PM

Is this one better Paul?
Can you explain why the boat builders version have that small pointed part.
Big smile my friend.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

11172 posts in 2557 days


#2 posted 05-13-2015 10:26 PM

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View lew's profile

lew

11348 posts in 3223 days


#3 posted 05-13-2015 10:36 PM

Beautiful job!

I’d cut my shins using it!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Roger's profile

Roger

19886 posts in 2271 days


#4 posted 05-13-2015 11:08 PM

I’m w/lew… Nice job tho Mads.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2265 days


#5 posted 05-14-2015 01:57 AM

I made a safety comment on your project post. :-)

Don’t know why it’s there but you can use it like a pick to pull timbers into place.

My adze is a cooper’s adze (lipped) and is used across the grain. It is generally used by holding the end of the handle against or very near the body with the left hand and using that hand as a fixed pivot point, rotating the head up away from the work and back down so that the blade barely shaves the material away. It is used more like a plane than an axe. The solid fulcrum helps maintain the critical distance to the work, allowing the thin shaving. It takes a lot of practice before you can do it completely relaxed but unless you are relaxed it just won’t sing for you.

There are places on boats that you just can’t shape with anything else.

Yes, that’s an adze mate!

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2265 days


#6 posted 05-14-2015 02:10 AM

Found you a picture of mine. It’s friend is my slick.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#7 posted 05-14-2015 06:55 AM

Another great blog!

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2802 days


#8 posted 05-19-2015 03:04 PM

Nice work Mads.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mafe's profile

mafe

11172 posts in 2557 days


#9 posted 05-21-2015 08:45 PM

Hi guys,
stefang, smiles here.
Topa, even more.
Paul, Big laugh. I love that slick, they are a wonderful pair, beautiful curve on the adze handle. Does the lips make it more easy to control? Just restored a slick not so long ago will post it soon.
Lew, laugh no you would be surprised how fast you get the hold of it.
Roger, auuuchhh. ;-)
Thanks guys,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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