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Workbench restore (Scandinavian style) #8: Scandinavian workbench restore - Side holds and end vise tuning

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Blog entry by mafe posted 03-31-2015 12:09 PM 2757 reads 0 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Grease pot for the bench Part 8 of Workbench restore (Scandinavian style) series no next part

Scandinavian workbench restore
Side holds and end vise tuning.

This is just a small update on the bench.
I get questions if I like this bench, the simple answer is yes.
I did have a few holding issues, but after making a bench top bench, I now have every thinkable hold position and would not trade my bench for any other bench (Perhaps a Benchcrafted splittop, it’s so sexy).

This little blog is just a upgrade with some side holds I made for long boards and my saw sharpening vise, they make life more easy, since they give support and keeps my hand free while putting things on the bench.
Really simple but also really a great help.

Second I will post a series of pictures of my tuning up the end vise, if others have this type of bench I think it might be handy.
The end vise had some slack to it and that made me annoyed even it worked, so I set out to make it steady.


Here the side holds are in action, they give support under my saw vise.
You will understand better once you read the rest…
(Notice the champagne box on the floor that are now a saw till).


A piece of hardwood are cut, app ten cm or 4 inches.
I make three.


Rounded a wee.


Drilled and counter sunk.


Waxed, also the screw for easy screwing in the workbench.


Waxing the hold for slip.


Screw in place under the bench.


Here you see them sticking out, when turned.
Quick and easy, but a wonderful upgrade that I use all the time now, especially when planning boards.

END VISE TUNING:

Ok here are the end vise (before I made new handles).
The more I used it the more I wanted to tune it.


First I took it apart.
A little investigation showed old glue and paint in the side tracks, but also that they have been suffering from time so they were too wide and this was one of the reasons for the up going loosenesss.
So it was cleaned up with a old lady’s tooth (router plane).


And then trimmed with side rabbet planes.
(Lovely to be able to use some of these sweet tools).


Added a shim to the runner, now the rabbet was even wider.


Like this.


To my surprise I found a crack in the spindle housing.
This explained more about the looseness.


For those wondering about the blue tape, I just glued a pice of cracked wood on the top, nothing interesting.


So glue and predrill for a screw to fix it.


Now just add a screw.


The jaw was now really out of square…
(My working created a new problem).


But that can be fixed easy.


With a hand plane.


Also correcting the other jaw, while I was there.


This is how much it was off.


Now grease up all of it, especially the moving parts.
I use a bees wax grease.


Remember the screw, here grease from my sweet old Danish grease pot.
Then just put it all together again.


Take a deserved rest and enjoy life.

Hope it can be to some inspiration or care for old benches.

Best thoughts,

MaFe

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



18 comments so far

View Brit's profile

Brit

6732 posts in 2308 days


#1 posted 03-31-2015 12:49 PM

Very nice Mads. Looks like a joy to use. Are you sharpening saws now then?

-- Andy -- "I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free." (Michelangelo)

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2308 posts in 2298 days


#2 posted 03-31-2015 12:50 PM

I get that same warm feeling each time I scroll through your posts :)

-- Thomas - Pondering the inclusion of woodworking into physics and chemistry classes...

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1140 posts in 1139 days


#3 posted 03-31-2015 01:13 PM

A bit of maintenance always pays dividends. This style of bench is so versatile.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View lew's profile

lew

11342 posts in 3221 days


#4 posted 03-31-2015 03:58 PM

Thanks for the enjoyable journey, Mads.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View mafe's profile

mafe

11157 posts in 2555 days


#5 posted 03-31-2015 05:39 PM

Hi there,
lew, thanks for joining me.
Tex, I agree it is a wonderful bench.
Soda, Thanks, I would love to have you here one fine day.
Britt, I am almost ashamed to admit I have only sharpened one hand saw and a frame saw, this even though I have now three different saw vises, have all sizes of files and even made saw tills now… Ohhh yes and have a full blog in my library on the subject I have never posted. I think it was due to the fact you made that wonderful blog on saws, it was like there were no reason to write more. For the sharpening, as soon as they are dull I will go for it, also have one that needs to be straightened, this is a subject I have not found a lot of writing about.
Too few hours…
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7174 posts in 2263 days


#6 posted 03-31-2015 10:57 PM

Nice work Mads, and I have to say you do that last step better than anyone!

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View mafe's profile

mafe

11157 posts in 2555 days


#7 posted 04-01-2015 12:02 AM

Retirement is a tough business Paul, I try to live up to the full potential.
Smiles,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View icemanhank's profile

icemanhank

297 posts in 1622 days


#8 posted 04-01-2015 10:53 PM

Hi Mads,

Funny that I was just thinking of buying this bench, do you think it is worth the effort to restore? The top of it looks like it is not very flat and I don’t know much about the holding vices (except for what you have kindly posted here) but it is reasonably cheap.

-- "These are my principles. And if you don't like them, I have others." ... Cheers, David from Sydney Australia

View mafe's profile

mafe

11157 posts in 2555 days


#9 posted 04-01-2015 11:45 PM

Hi Hank,
Judging from the picture it looks like a hobby sized bench in the fair end of size and in a good condition.
If you load the cabinet with tools it will help with some weight so it will stay still when you work.
My first workbench were app same size and I loved it, but ended up giving it two bolts down the concrete floor, after that it was a real joy. So yes if the prize are good, go for it, I think a bench like this can always get sold again, so money would never be lost. You can look in my blog how to make bench dogs and other upgrades.
Test if the vises are giving a good hold and if the end vice runs straight without too much wobbling.
To flatten the top the easiest would be a router on a sled, running on two straight edges, but can also be done by hand with a long plane and some sweat.
Give me a hint if you buy it.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View icemanhank's profile

icemanhank

297 posts in 1622 days


#10 posted 04-02-2015 04:09 AM

Thanks again Mads for all of the info, I will let you know how I go for sure. I am going to have a look at it tonight.

-- "These are my principles. And if you don't like them, I have others." ... Cheers, David from Sydney Australia

View Roger's profile

Roger

19881 posts in 2269 days


#11 posted 04-02-2015 12:26 PM

You have everything you need there Mads. Even that white bear your relaxing in looks good. :)

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2800 days


#12 posted 04-02-2015 01:52 PM

Good work deserves good rest, but it appears that I don’t have to tell you that.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Todd Swartwood's profile

Todd Swartwood

257 posts in 1191 days


#13 posted 04-02-2015 02:02 PM

Hey Mads, it always feels good to tighten up an old friend.

Have a blessed day and make some dust, Todd

-- Todd Swartwood (Todd Swart-Woodworks)

View mafe's profile

mafe

11157 posts in 2555 days


#14 posted 04-02-2015 02:41 PM

Smiles Iceman!
Roger, laughs, just hope it will not bite me (it’s two sheep’s).
Stefang, I am kind of a master, when I finally do it… But often have too many things going on.
Todd, working on a handful of planes these days, also cleaning up in the shop, helping a friend, drinking coffee, espresso, taking a short tour to Sweden, fixing and driving my old vespa… Hmmmm, guess there are too little dust.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View madts's profile

madts

1685 posts in 1805 days


#15 posted 04-02-2015 05:22 PM

Mads, nice last pic. I used to smoke a pipe many years ago. Seeing you lounge like reminds me of that.
Nice job on the bench.

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

showing 1 through 15 of 18 comments

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