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Sharpening station waterstones #3: Flattening water stones - silicon carbide flattening stone

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Blog entry by mafe posted 12-08-2013 05:45 PM 1748 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Waterstones travel pond (fitted in a plastic box). Part 3 of Sharpening station waterstones series no next part

Flattening water stones
silicon carbide flattening stone

I was asked how I flatten my water stones.
This is how.
It’s just to buy a flattening stone, the silicon carbides are app half price and does a fine job.
I have never tried a diamond flattening plate, so I cant compare.


Here the Japanese NANIWA flattening stone.
This one for fine grits.
Just spray water to clean up and move the stone in circles.
Do it often, then it’s not a tough job.


Easy to see how it goes on the bright colour stones.


That’s it.


This one looks better.


And takes also few strokes to be flat.


Here on top of the pond.


On the dark colour stones, it can be fine to draw on the top with a marker, to see how it goes.


Back to working.

A flat stone for a straight edge.

Best thoughts,

Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



14 comments so far

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1742 days


#1 posted 12-08-2013 05:48 PM

http://www.fine-tools.com/abrichtblock.html

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7010 posts in 1957 days


#2 posted 12-08-2013 05:54 PM

well mads, it looks like your just as good in flatening things as you are in making big boo_….well i better watch my language here, this is a family friendly web page…:)...i think you get it huh…lol

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1742 days


#3 posted 12-08-2013 05:57 PM

LOL Grizz, just updating some old blogs here.
No rocket blonde.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11445 posts in 1759 days


#4 posted 12-08-2013 05:59 PM

Very nice, Mads. It is very similar to the lapping block we used when we wanted to truly fatten hardened steel surfaces such as gauge blocks so the were to flat they would “wring” together.
We had a steel place with vert. and horiz. grooves and use grit such as you used and the we lap in a figure 8 motion and I still use that motion today to sand wood to flatten for gluing with now seam showing. it is a must for corian seams.

Cheers, my friend!!.............................Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1742 days


#5 posted 12-08-2013 08:32 PM

Hi Jim, when you look at these rough blocks, it seems not possible, but yes, they really work.
It’s amazing how our body learn movement patterns, it’s at the end a big part of how we become good at a trade of the hand. Repetition, repetition and repetition. Smiles.
Best thoughts my friend,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View lew's profile

lew

10030 posts in 2409 days


#6 posted 12-08-2013 10:41 PM

Thanks, Mads.
I must learn to do this better.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1742 days


#7 posted 12-08-2013 10:48 PM

I think there are as many approaches to sharpening as there are woodworkers.
Perhaps we could tell a little about the persons personality by looking at his sharpening station.
I guess I need a psychologist… OCD. LOL.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Philip's profile

Philip

1110 posts in 1192 days


#8 posted 12-09-2013 09:32 PM

Very sharp indeed… I like the ball bearing honing guide- haven’t seen one of those before…

-- If you can dream it, I can do it!

View kiefer's profile

kiefer

3068 posts in 1320 days


#9 posted 12-10-2013 04:38 AM

If works don’t change it’s the results speak for them self .
Sharpening is an art and you have mastered it in you own way .

-- Kiefer 松

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1742 days


#10 posted 12-11-2013 02:00 PM

I actually did buy a rough diamond plate, but it’s less effective… So I’ll stick to this.
Philip, it’s really cool for chamfered blades.
Kiefer, yes it’s almost a religion. And when you learn to master it, it’s a kind of meditation I think, especially the stones.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View ramone's profile

ramone

10 posts in 127 days


#11 posted 05-30-2014 10:02 PM

... is this flattening stone the same one sold by Norton? I just bought the Norton combo set which included this stone … but many people say this stone doesn’t stay flat and therefore the sharpening stones don’t get flat. You seem to have a different experience.

Could you say more about how well this flattening stone retains its flatness? Thanks.

http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/Norton-P29C25.aspx?gclid=CPHUj-vS1L4CFQ9lfgodqh4AkQ

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1742 days


#12 posted 05-31-2014 12:12 PM

Hi Ramone,
Sorry I don’t know if it’s the same, this one is from fine-tools in Germany.
It have stayed flat for me, but perhaps in time… I have no idea. I also have diamond plates so guess I can just flatten the flattening stone if needed then.. laughs.
So sorry I can’t help more, it’s flat for now and works perfectly well.
Use a straight edge to check it every six months or so, then you will know, also use the full stone so you don’t ware down only one part, just as when you use the stones for sharpening.
. ;-)
Some woodworkers have used the concrete sidewalks for flattening their stones, this for years and build more than most of us can ever dream of, try tell them what you need… think some of the woodworking ‘stars’, usually journalists that are not woodworkers have put this poison into the joy, woodworking is not a fixed science, it’s a trade, a learning process, you will find your ways and what works for you by doing, this combined with inspiration from others and respect for those who really know their craft but not always do it the ‘right’ way.
Best of my thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1742 days


#13 posted 05-31-2014 12:13 PM

These are the same as I have and they work really fine:
http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/Extra-Large-Naniwa-Flattening-Stone-P390C97.aspx
The one you have looked at is super.
(I have had a neck operation, so I just want to be able to lay the stone down and use weight, not force, to be gentle on my arms and neck, that’s why I bought the big size).
If you buy diamonds for flattening instead, you have to be aware they also wear out, so it’s a quite expensive path to walk – my advice is; buy diamonds for you wife instead, she will appreciate more and you will feel more love.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1742 days


#14 posted 05-31-2014 12:18 PM

I bought mine here:
http://www.fine-tools.com/G-abrichtblock.html

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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