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Sharpening station waterstones #1: Workshop sharpening station - near at hand

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Blog entry by mafe posted 12-08-2013 04:16 PM 1908 reads 4 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Sharpening station waterstones series Part 2: Waterstones travel pond (fitted in a plastic box). »

Workshop sharpening station
near at hand

This post is from my un-posted folder.

In the new workshop I placed the water grinder in a different room than the work bench.
So I thought it would be nice with a close at hand sharpening station right next to the bench.


So here the new shop setup, all the tool right at hand.


Sharpening station with the pond and gear right at hand.
In the cabinet I keep all the different stones, jigs, oils and what else is needed for obtaining that sweet edge on the different types of tools.

The making of the pond can be seen here: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/26080
Here you can read more about my water grinder setup: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/series/3071


I start by soaking the stones, so they will be ready for the job.


Then it’s just to choose the right stone and sharpen.


Also fine for a quick touch up with a loaded strop.


Especially when I do paring I want that razor sharp edge.

The edge can’t be to sharp and the edge defines the tool.

Best thoughts,

Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



13 comments so far

View Bricofleur's profile

Bricofleur

1197 posts in 1947 days


#1 posted 12-08-2013 05:11 PM

Good idea, Mads. This is the best way to be sure to use sharp tools all the time. No reason to skip it now ! :)

Best,

Serge

http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

-- Learn from yesterday, work today and enjoy success tomorrow. -- http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9690 posts in 1843 days


#2 posted 12-08-2013 05:19 PM

It will come right back once the shop is up and running again Serge.
Smiles, Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

12383 posts in 1859 days


#3 posted 12-08-2013 05:20 PM

Nice station you have, Mads. i could use something like that to get a razor sharp edge. I get them sharp on a diamond but I feel they need that little extra that you can feel when using a chisel!!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2088 days


#4 posted 12-08-2013 05:31 PM

Looks great Mads, but I have to admit that I am glad to get away from hand sharpening after I bought my Tormek. My diamond plate still does the best job of lapping the backs of my edge tools though. I know from reading a lot of articles on the subject that waterstones do produce the sharpest edges, but I am just getting too lazy in my old age to make the effort.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Philip's profile

Philip

1154 posts in 1293 days


#5 posted 12-08-2013 05:34 PM

Great set up Mads.

-- I never finish anyth

View Brit's profile

Brit

5313 posts in 1597 days


#6 posted 12-08-2013 10:31 PM

Very nice. No excuse not keep your edge tools in peak condition now.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View nobuckle's profile

nobuckle

1120 posts in 1515 days


#7 posted 12-09-2013 08:58 PM

Thanks for sharing your method Mads. I do not own any water stones. I can’t afford them. I often times have to use sand paper on a flat surface like glass or granite. I do own some oil stones but I’d rather use water stones or diamond plates if I could.

-- Doug - Make an effort to live by the slogan "We try harder"

View mafe's profile

mafe

9690 posts in 1843 days


#8 posted 12-11-2013 01:48 PM

Hi,
Nobuckel, there are no right way, sandpaper, oil stones, what ever… It’s what keeps the tool sharp enough to get it sharp enough to what purpose you need the tool for. Then there are a lot of religion, lol. For me the sharpest edge I have been able to make is with the water stones, but it does not mean I do all my sharpening like that.
I use many ways, depending on the edge I need, the time I have and where I am. If I was doing general woodworking for a living or just need a sharp edge fast, the water grinder is by fare the best in my experience, nothing beats the result held against the time, this is also my choice always for axes, turning tools and planer knifes.
Sandpaper works really fine and are also relatively fast.
Andy, I love that, so I never need an excuse. ;-)
Philip, ;-)
Stefang, read what I wrote for nobuckle, I so agree with you, you can also do the lapping on the side of the wheel.
Jim, In Denamrk the diamond plates are app double prize than US, so I only have a few, never went up grit, so I have not been able to compare. The 10.000 grit stone as a finish, is that mirror finish, that makes an edge that allows you to cut wood like butter. When I have a chisel in my hand with an edge like that – I can hear sweet music and feel a deep joy, like as if the wood and tool are making love. (Yes I know I’m not normal).
Thanks guys,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Brit's profile

Brit

5313 posts in 1597 days


#9 posted 12-11-2013 02:48 PM

“In Denamrk the diamond plates are app double prize than US”

Not just Denmark Mads. Anywhere outside the US and Canada I believe.

If you take DMT diamond stones as an example. Let’s say you wanted a set of 5 DMT Dia-sharps and you opted for the 8”x3” jobbies. In the US, you can buy the D8XX, D8C, D8F, D8E, D8EE for around $327. It would be about £437 in the UK, which is around $716. A big difference. It is the same for any tool made outside of Europe. Also, unless you pick up all your wood from the forest floor, that’s twice as expensive too and far less accessible. Add to that the higher taxes (Denmark being the highest in Europe) and cost of living and the fact that Europeans tend to have far less disposable income and you soon realise that you’ve got to be pretty dedicated to be a woodworker in Europe. It sure ain’t easy.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Brit's profile

Brit

5313 posts in 1597 days


#10 posted 12-11-2013 03:34 PM

By the way, you really should learn how to spell the name of your own country. LOL.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9690 posts in 1843 days


#11 posted 12-12-2013 08:14 PM

Ahhh so you suffer for the prizes also Andy.
Lol yes I see Dnamerk is another pissibollity…
I agree we are endlessly dedicated since we bleed so much for the toys – ehhh tools.
Best thoughts my dear friend,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View BustedClock's profile

BustedClock

112 posts in 1276 days


#12 posted 12-12-2013 08:25 PM

Harumph…

I have a hard time seeing how something more expensive than gold—seemingly—could be twice the price elsewhere. I always assumed I was just getting gouged.

Live and learn.

-- Hey, I'm usually right twice a day! Except where they use 24 hour clocks.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9690 posts in 1843 days


#13 posted 12-12-2013 08:50 PM

;-)

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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