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Sharpening methods #3: The Eclipse & Record honing guides in use

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Blog entry by mafe posted 09-03-2011 09:55 PM 13142 reads 10 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: A update on my personal sharpening methods. Part 3 of Sharpening methods series Part 4: Stropping (honing on a leather strop) »

The Eclipse honing guide in use
and a jig for fast setup.

Just wanted to make a little update where I show the honing jig I use and a jig for fast set up I finally made.
Yes I use the Eclipse honing guide to help me control on the grinding of the chisels and plane irons, for touching up I usually freehand, and for Japanese plane irons you need no guide since they are so thick.


This is how it looks when you use the jig.
You push down on the pull.
Here I use it with sandpaper on glass plate for sharpening, but you can use it on any stone or diamond also.


The jig is really simple to make.
For plane irons:
A piece of plywood and then mark and fasten a stop at 2 inch 25 degrees on one side and 1 1/2 inch 30 degrees on the other side.


The plane irons must be mounted on the top of the honing jig.


Set the iron in the jig and push the iron up to the stop and fasten the blade in the jig.
It’s that simple.


For chisels also, I use the other side of the jig for this, in this way I need only one jig.


The chisel is mounted in the lower part of the guide.


Choose honing degree and fasten the screw.


When not in use, you can fasten the jig in the guide and in this way it will be where you need it.

Finally I don’t have to look for my meter anymore when sharpening.
Hope it could be to inspiration.

UPDATE AUGUST 2012


Updated my guides with this old Record 161.


It has a ball runner under, this means it is exelent for camber or even rounding edges.


It’s simple and fast to adjust.


Here blade in place.


The edge.


The back.


Remember the cap iron.

Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



21 comments so far

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11781 posts in 1801 days


#1 posted 09-03-2011 10:04 PM

Very clever, Mads. I like the idea of storing it with the jig so they don’t get separated when you need them.
You are always thinking , my friend!!!!!!!!!!..................Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12295 posts in 2792 days


#2 posted 09-03-2011 10:23 PM

It is a great solution. Very simple and elegant. Have you seen the LN version?

http://www.lie-nielsen.com/pdf/AngleSettingJig.pdf

I’ve had it on my build list for a while.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2046 posts in 1528 days


#3 posted 09-03-2011 10:27 PM

Very clever indeed! I definately need to get me one of these honing guides.

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

View Brit's profile

Brit

5236 posts in 1538 days


#4 posted 09-03-2011 10:41 PM

Nicely done as ever Mads.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View philip marcou's profile

philip marcou

262 posts in 1292 days


#5 posted 09-03-2011 11:47 PM

That particular honing guide is ideal and others keep trying to re-invent it. I have used mine since I got it at age 14. I used to have some jigs to control projection but now just measure since plane making has required some extra angles. I have written the projection amounts down on the box lid of my diamond plate in case i forget them in old age (tomorrow).
As a matter of interest , Eclipse modified that guide a bit-and here are pictures of old and new.
Anyone who wants to donate a re-invented one such as the Veritas to me because it looks so nice is quite welcome to do so (;);(;). If I had to buy another one because of want I would buy the Bridge City one and would be interested to see which one I favoured in the end.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1350 days


#6 posted 09-04-2011 12:14 AM

This is the only sharpening jig worth having in my book. I use a similar stop block and have made singular ones like your for the toolbox, thats for showing this one because I STILL got some ideas from it (like keeping the jig attached to…the other jig when not in use.

I like to use the jig on the push stroke since it allows me to adjust the angle from left to right using thumb pressure, try it some time.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View philip marcou's profile

philip marcou

262 posts in 1292 days


#7 posted 09-04-2011 12:34 AM

RG said “I like to use the jig on the push stroke since it allows me to adjust the angle from left to right using thumb pressure, try it some time.”
BINGO! That is how one get that slight camber on smoother plane blades which eliminates tracks and gives a feathered shaving…..And if you use a diamond plate you can press down hard on the edges without fear of scoring as might happen with a soft stone.

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1286 posts in 1754 days


#8 posted 09-04-2011 02:53 AM

I really like the jig to set the distance for the appropriate angle. I have one of those eclipse jigs, although mine is a different brand. I also have one of the old Millers Falls jigs (after which the Lee Valley jig is patterned). I really like it because it can be adjusted for a micro bevel without having to unclamp the tool from the jig, but for some functions the eclipse style jig is better. For example, the eclipse, with that narrow wheel, can easily be used to put a slight radius on a smoothing plane iron.

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13345 posts in 2368 days


#9 posted 09-04-2011 03:22 AM

I have a few of those jigs myself.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3091 posts in 1629 days


#10 posted 09-04-2011 10:59 AM

Mine is collecting dust since I got the worksharp. I am still going back to the stone age (:) someday.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View mafe's profile

mafe

9573 posts in 1784 days


#11 posted 09-04-2011 05:58 PM

Yes just a little simple jig to make life more easy, but when we sharpen a lot, it also makes life a lot easier…
The Lie Nielsen idea with the little extra piece for the micro bevel is really clever, I will make one like that, thank you Wayne.

Philip, are the one of the Eclipse better than the other? Perhaps the one with the large wedge shape is better to hold old firmer chisels without bevel edge…

RG, why is it better to make the edge on the push? I do the same but on the pull.

Best thoughts and thank you for the comments and ideas,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1802 days


#12 posted 09-04-2011 09:24 PM

Thanks Mads. I have the honing jig, but I have always had to fight the set up. Just the lesson I needed for my sharpening station. I’ll make one today.

I love LJ’s. I always learn something new every time I log on.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1350 days


#13 posted 09-04-2011 10:36 PM

I did not say it was better, just a different way of doing it. To be more specific when I push my thumbs are on the blade and the jig is away from me. So when I push the pressure is keeping the blade on the stone as well as moving the blade across it.

For me it’s easier on the muscles in my fingers and as Philip noted it is really easy to get a minute radius for smoothing planes with this technique. I do most of my sharpening freehand but I use the eclipse when I am regrinding a tool I don’t want to have a hollow grind (like a mortise chisel) and on those days when I don’t quite feel 100%.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Brit's profile

Brit

5236 posts in 1538 days


#14 posted 09-04-2011 11:58 PM

I understand exactly what you mean now Ryan. When you said ealier that you pushed, I was envisaging you pushing the eclipse guide rotated through 180 degrees, so the blade would be digging into the stone and throwing a burr on the front of the blade rather than the back.

After reading what you just wrote though, it makes perfect sense and I can see how it might be easier on the muscles in the hands. I’ll have to try it. Thanks.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9573 posts in 1784 days


#15 posted 09-05-2011 12:33 AM

Rand, yes it is amazing how much we learn here! I also say that to my self again and again. I read woodworking books and learn little, then surf LJ and learn new every day.

Ryan I will give it a go.
I have bad arms neck and shoulders so this might be a really good trick for me.

Andy, are you still going in Copenhagen? If so – should we grab a beer one day?

Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

showing 1 through 15 of 21 comments

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