LumberJocks

Making an ancient bucket MaFe #7: The bottom, the side angels and start of the handle.

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by mafe posted 1297 days ago 3008 reads 0 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: A simple angel marker Part 7 of Making an ancient bucket MaFe series Part 8: Planing the outside, shaping the mandle and start of the lid. »

The bottom, the side angels and start of the handle.
just before a week of.

Now I will see if I can get to make the bottom and lit I said in the fourth blog, so I better get there.

I will make the stafs different width, and set up the angels by eye, and not by math.


Since I made the sides of recycled pallet wood, I thought I better go on with the recycle concept; here are some boards from a trashed IKEA bed found in the street.
Laying side by side, trying to avoid as many knots as possible, and then marking to know the way later.
Two unparallel lines like you see in the photo are an excellent way.


Lifting the boards two and two as shown, back to back.


Clamping them up.


Running that wonderful old Stanley.
And smoking, this is especially important.


A nice tight fit, and the marking are still easy to follow.


All with a tight fit now.


Marking the bottom diameter, and two cross lines for the dowels.


Transfer marks for the dowels.


Choosing a drill method! Or we can call it a travel in time.
I will not go into each here, just let you enjoy the beauty of them (yes another E-bay purchase).


I choose the spade drill, only because I know it’s really old, and because I never tried one of these before.
It was really fast and easy to use, impressed me quite a lot!


Test hole.


Not much tear out, and a quite crisp drilling.


Marking the depth of the dowel position with a marking gauge.


Making a mark with an awl.


After drilling the holes in one side, I use little pins, to get the exact point of the matching holes. If you don’t have these, just make some carful layout and you will be fine.


Time for planning.


Flat!


Marking the thickness I want for the bucket bottom boards, in this way I have an aim point for my planning after.


Removing thickness of the bottom with a scrub plane. To be honest it was the first time in my life I tried one of these, and it was really a pleasure, wood was removed so fast and with little effort.


I did not even sharpen that old lady!
(Thank you to Napoleon, who gave this sweet girl one day).


Now I was in the mood for using wooden planes, so I took out my old beauty, and made shaves.
Admit it! Yes! It is so much more wonderful than a metal plane… Hmmmmmmm…. Wood against wood, no sharp edges, and this one with an adjustable mouth.


The beauty of the shaves.


So now I have the desired thickness of the bottom.
(The photo shows before and after).


Stafs and the bottom.


Making a guide. I use a string, an awl and a pencil. This must have been possible, at least with a nail as awl, a string and a nail as marker.


Since I want to make a lit also I decide to save time and my now very sour arms…
So I take of some thickness on the circular saw.


I drill with the help of Mr. Bosch.


Ohhh yes, and since my Festool state of the art table could not hold the thin boards without I hack into the clamps with the plane, I used some good old fashion wedges to clamp…


Like this.
(This might also be a little more authentic than Festool).


The thickness in mm and inches.


Once more… Forgive me, I’m slow!


One bottom and one lit. Or at least the boards for it.


Since my arms at this point were in pain, I choose to use some power tools to help me cutting the bottom circle jig. I used my primitive circle jig (sorry Martyn, I will get to this when I have more time).


Wood, nails, hammer and a raised jig are done.


Now time to make a tool to help me when I try to eyeball the angels for the staffs.
Again; wood, nails, hammer and a holding jig are made.
At the picture you see the staf, and the jig on my no eight plane.


Jig holding the staf.


And ready to run!
Like this I get a firm grip, and a good feel and view of the angel I plane.


Holding the staf in place with a little wedge.


The setup, the raised bottom jig, and now stafs can take shape around as I plane them.


I found out I needed to hold it in place, and did so with string and wedge.


Like so!


Here you see the miracle happening!
Also in the right corner you see my high-tech electric digital angel gauge! Why! Because I simply had to give up du to health, and make the initial cuts for the stafs by the table saw, and then the fine tuning on my angel planning setup.


Here you see where I got to.
I will continue next week, now a week of, this will be good for me since my body at this state feels like around a hounded and seven years old…


Layout for a handle.


A handle.
(Mike I will round the ends, so it will be able to swing).

That’s it for now!

Hope it could bring some inspiration, some laughs and perhaps even some light!

Mike thanks for this inspiring ancient bucket blog or master class.

Best thoughts,

MaFe

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



19 comments so far

View mafe's profile

mafe

9491 posts in 1721 days


#1 posted 1297 days ago

My!!! I get a comment from a escort service in Delhi.
I think I will ask Martin to remove that comment, sorry but I do not think that kind of offers are having a place here!

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2002 posts in 1464 days


#2 posted 1297 days ago

Eeww you’re right dude.
I love how you’re getting the bucket growing from pallet wood to an almost finished beauty :)

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

View mafe's profile

mafe

9491 posts in 1721 days


#3 posted 1297 days ago

Thomas, I’m only sorry I did not have enough pallet wood for all, but a bed bottom trached is hopefully also ok.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2135 posts in 1740 days


#4 posted 1297 days ago

Mads, I enjoy your detailed blogs. Well documented post and you left a good deal of bread crumbs behind so I can work on this project later this year.

Nice deal, you post a blog and get an escort service. People just pat me on the back. I hope someday I can reach your level ;)

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9491 posts in 1721 days


#5 posted 1297 days ago

David, I laough out loud – I did not think of it that way! Thank you for the nice comment, I enjoyed to make it, so we are two. Good luck on your go, feel free to ask any questions when you start.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Charles Maxwell's profile

Charles Maxwell

950 posts in 2439 days


#6 posted 1297 days ago

I’m following your ancient bucket posts with interest. You have a fantastic array of techniques. I find your posts very useful. I’m seeing some clamping devices that I have not seen in the USA. Would you be so kind as to share some photos and describe your systems for clamping/holding your pieces in place while you work them? I hope you’ll continue to share your ideas here. Fantastic!

-- Max the "night janitor" at www.hardwoodclocks.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9491 posts in 1721 days


#7 posted 1297 days ago

Hi Max,
It’s Festool MFT3 system: http://www.festoolusa.com/products/mft-multifunction-tables/mft3-multifunction-table-495462.html
I love this table, it is nothing less than brilliant, but it’s a work table, not a workbench. I have also tablesaw and router in this system and love it too. (It’s quite expensive I must say).
Thank you for your words,
best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View swirt's profile

swirt

1937 posts in 1603 days


#8 posted 1297 days ago

Rest up. That was a great story and wonderful photos. When your strength returns, keep us informed ;)

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9491 posts in 1721 days


#9 posted 1297 days ago

A few shots from my rest here in Paris:

I see light.

I see rest, and kindness.

I see beauty lager than we can imagine possible.

Yes I vist Notre Dame yesterday, this place can bring you peace, when you focus on the details.

Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View stefang's profile

stefang

12935 posts in 1966 days


#10 posted 1297 days ago

Ok Mads, then you will have a bucket. Very well done blog.With the extra height on the handle stave’s, that should work very well. Loved the blog to see how you do things. Your work is coming along very well. I really enjoyed seeing you working with those fine wooden planes. Thanks for pics of Notre dame. I think these are the first interior shots I’ve seen of it. I think cathedral building from the middle ages is very interesting. I’ve read a bit about it. I like the building cranes they used and of course their fantastic building skills and architecture.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3076 posts in 1566 days


#11 posted 1297 days ago

Nice blog Mads.

I was admiring the old brace and all there old tools up until I saw that table saw and the drill press..

Just pulling your legs.

Great job.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View stefang's profile

stefang

12935 posts in 1966 days


#12 posted 1297 days ago

Mads, I forgot to mention in my comments above that I hand planed my bottom joints like you did. It is a great way to do it as you are guaranteed a matching joint even if they aren’t level.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9491 posts in 1721 days


#13 posted 1297 days ago

Hi,
Ian, I laugh. And must admit my passion goes both ways, old tools and new tools. I can enjoy my Festool high-tech monster as much as my old brace, each for beeing state of the art of their time, each for bringing us a step furter away from the stone age. My worry is how far do we need to get, or even more how fare is it good for our souls.
Mike, this church is to me a heavy bastard from the outside, at first the same on the inside – but when you give it time, it grows with you, and you start to admire the beautiful light that are only possible in the gradious darkness, the scale, the construction.
If you want to see ever the grateness of light it will not be in the Saint Chapelle, this church is just on the other side, on the Isle, this is a breath taking building, in every sence, to build so light, so elegant and in stones and glass, wauuuuuu.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sainte-Chapelle

Here a picture I took yesterday of the tower, please notice how thin the structure is.


This could make us think of Japan, but it’s a coner of Notre Dame.

At least 12 guys had seen a light, yesterday I did also.

Some bring the light to the darkness.

In the center, is the kindness, we are all able to make rings in the water like these rings, all we have to do is to try.

And do not forget to wish the best for the others.

Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Dave's profile

Dave

11159 posts in 1471 days


#14 posted 1296 days ago

Mads I am dearly loving the contrast of your and Mikes blog. This is great. OK after the bucket, how about a wagon wheel. JK. I have just stepped off into the wood only planes. In a way you can feel the wood you are working to the point the you almost see with the feel. If my metaphor makes sense. It does in my mind.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9491 posts in 1721 days


#15 posted 1296 days ago

This is interesting also.
The tools of the French barrel maker / tonnelier:
http://www.anciens-outils.com/tonnelier.htm
Notice the Colombe, it a giant plane on legs, this is clever, and I think answer some of our questions.
‘overturned big jointer used to draw the edges of the staves of barrels and funds’.
So it was done by the eye and experience I suppose.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

showing 1 through 15 of 19 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase