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Making an ancient bucket MaFe #3: Scandinavian lag knife DIY

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Blog entry by mafe posted 01-30-2011 03:50 PM 3805 reads 1 time favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Hand plane, binding lever, lag knife Part 3 of Making an ancient bucket MaFe series Part 4: Binding lever... »

Scandinavian lag knife DIY
Or Mike meets Mads again…

Updated 1 Februar 2011.

So my go on the lag knife, Scandinavian style:


The lag knife.
I cut it roughly to shape, turned the round part for the ferrule on the lathe, added some curves and shaped it with a spokeshave, finish with a sraper and then linsed oil and beeswax.


I added a ferrule, and then drilled three holes next to each other with a long drill..


Rasped out the wood between the holes.


Even out of focus…


Mixed and heated some epoxy.
Heated so it becomes thin floating and can run easy into the thin hole


The knife blade goes in, and I hammer on a piece of wood not to break the tip of the blade.
(And yet I actually did… So I needed a little regrinding).


Here you see it set, and you can see the broken tip…


Since I cut my self twice, I decided to make a mushroom sheet for it.
Once so deep that there was a cascade of blood that spread over the tools, floor and my sharpener… Nothing serious just the tip of the finger where it always bleed a lot.

Here the Scandinavian way, from my sketchbook.

And here how to make the little tool.


Hope this can be useful, perhaps even someone will try and make a knife.
And to post it so we can all see it.

Again Mike thanks you for the ancient bucket project blog.

Best thoughts,

MaFe

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



10 comments so far

View Bricofleur's profile (online now)

Bricofleur

1186 posts in 1917 days


#1 posted 01-30-2011 06:25 PM

Thanks Mads. I will give it a try some day when needed. I like to make my own tools too.

Best,

Serge

http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

-- Learn from yesterday, work today and enjoy success tomorrow. -- http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

View stefang's profile

stefang

13530 posts in 2058 days


#2 posted 01-30-2011 06:52 PM

Thanks for for this Mads. What a great idea. I have been thinking about making some knives from my saber saw blades, but I never thought about the possibility to make what I call a keyhole type saw. There has been so many times I’ve needed one.

I’m just doing my knife and binding lever blog right now, so I hope you will have a look. My knife will not be as good as yours, but It works!!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1839 days


#3 posted 01-30-2011 09:27 PM

thank´s Mads

Dennis

View swirt's profile

swirt

1949 posts in 1696 days


#4 posted 01-31-2011 06:18 AM

Great drawings and directions with translations. Fun to look over.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3097 posts in 1658 days


#5 posted 01-31-2011 06:34 AM

It looks like a drywal saw.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View mafe's profile

mafe

9621 posts in 1813 days


#6 posted 01-31-2011 12:37 PM

Hi,
The tool is the same as a dry wall saw, only more slim.
The brilliance of using these saw blades is that you can make them in several tooth versions from rough to fine, and ofcourse they are extremely cheap.

Here you can see some I did many years ago.
The mandles are scrap, a dowel and almost no finish here, the pistol grip works really fine.
No rocket sience, but really handy tool. A kind of keyhole saw.
Serge, it’s so revarding to make your own knife, it’s such a basic tool, that it really touch something in our cave man, when we make one of those.
Swirt, I have made a hole book like this, about the knife making, so I’m glad you like it, perhaps I should publish this little book as a cheap alternative to the real book marked.
Dennis, thanks.
Mike, I did see you knife now, and it’s really nice, I like it! And I think it was good you added that bolster at the end to hold the endgrain together when using it as a liver, it is a lot of force that can be put into that knife. I think also I will make a finer version of this keyhole saw’s after this.
Best thoughts, and thank you for your comments,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2691 posts in 1801 days


#7 posted 02-01-2011 04:46 AM

Yet another new one on me Mads. Well done bud!

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13530 posts in 2058 days


#8 posted 02-01-2011 12:36 PM

Wonderful job Mads, Nicely finished too. I would be willing to trade with you. It didn’t occur to me to use my scraper on mine, but it’s not too late! I haven’t paid much attention to aesthetics with my tools like you always do. I will go back and give them all a nicer finish later just to follow your good example. Now you just have the binding lever to make. Don’t forget the rounded jaws like I did! Oh, and mother-of-pearl inlays aren’t allowed on the lever, ha ha.

I did laugh when you said you cut yourself, but not at you. It reminded me of when I was making the wooden plane. I cut my little finger, which bled a lot, then at lunch I was cutting some bread and I managed to cut my index finger and the one next to it right on the tips. So it wasn’t very comfortable working for awhile. I was thinking of staining my plane red.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1839 days


#9 posted 02-01-2011 01:08 PM

thank´s for the update Mads
its a nice knife ,I have never hear about or seen the protection cap before
but I think its a great idea :-)
what wonders me is what a plummers wrench has to do in a woodshop :-)

have a great day
Dennis

View mafe's profile

mafe

9621 posts in 1813 days


#10 posted 02-02-2011 12:29 AM

Hi,
Dennis, the wrench is when canging spindel on my lathe so there are a good explanation, but I do understand you were wondering (perhaps you still are). I have never seen or heard about a mushroom protection cap before eighter! But it will keep it safe, and I thought it was a little funny. Smiles.
Mike, Yes it’s never too late. I acually added the finish just for protecting the wood, no polish and so, but yes it do makes it look nicer also, more warm. I promise there will be no mother of pearl inlay in my binding lever.
Yes I laughed also about me cutting my fingers since I remembered you tell of you doing just that, so I was thinking we are really a wonderful team! Now I hit the wrong places on the keyboard all the time, since two fingers are in band aid (Is that the right name for it?).
Dan, ;-)
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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