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Tool tote travel #2: glue up and details.

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Blog entry by mafe posted 1280 days ago 2814 reads 1 time favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: a learning travel in tools and techniques. Part 2 of Tool tote travel series Part 3: finger joints on a template / jig. »

Tool tote travel
glue up and details

This is second part of the tool tote travel.

Time for glue up.
Table covered, water, PU glue, brush and gloves.

Applying water on the joints, so the glue will work, and expand as wanted.
Then the glue, and the rest is a just a puzzle, where you don’t want to use your camera, since you forgot to wear the gloves, and had glue all over…

So here we are with clean fingers, and a clamped up tool tote.
It’s important that you have remembered the handle at this point, since mine can’t come out again…

Starting to make the interior.
The dreawers that will later come needs something to ride on, so while the glue dry, I plane and cut the two ‘runners’.

I also decided at this point to make some pegs to hold the handle.
So I took a piece of cut of from the branch, and cut it up.
(On the side you see the beautiful burl I got from my friend Jamie).

Dish sanding in shape.


Cut to length.

Final shaping.

Clamps removed after dry up, and ready for some finish.
First with the scraper. Not bad at all for a vintage architect…

Ok all was not perfect after all…
So I mix some sawdust and some white glue to make a filler to hide my mistakes from my LJ friends!

Time to fix the handle, and to change my mind!
The idea with the wooden pegs, are not elegant enough, it’s too rustic for my design…

Drilling a hole! Bravo!!!

Making some new pegs, out of round stock.
Pointing one end, so they will glide through the holes.

After hammering them in place with a little glue added, I cut of the ends.
This I believe gives a more discrete but still visual joint.

And yes I wax!

Two mistakes here!
First are the spur by the dovetail, I cut too deep with the marker, but this is easy to solve with a glue and sawdust mixture.
What is worse is that I did not think of the gab that would come on top where the two sides meet (I had made my marking after the side before the dovetail was subtracted)… Learning by doing!

Rescue 911, I saw it down, in a matching curve – and we are close….

Time to spin that sander!

And a smaller for the meeting point.

And here we are! Ready to take that pipe for a walk.

And inside the box two little fine pegs, ready for another project…

I’ll split the blog up here again, so it does not become too long for a ISDN connection…
In the next part I will make the interior.

Hope this little travel can be to inspiration, or in best case a tool tote

Best thoughts,
MaFe

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



12 comments so far

View rance's profile

rance

4104 posts in 1658 days


#1 posted 1280 days ago

Nice Blog. And nice project too. Thanks for posting.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View patron's profile

patron

12831 posts in 1839 days


#2 posted 1280 days ago

a great tote

will it fit under the seat
on the airplane

or do you have to make another one

in paris

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1613 days


#3 posted 1280 days ago

great humoristic blog as usual Mads
keep up with the good work

Dennis

View swirt's profile

swirt

1912 posts in 1470 days


#4 posted 1280 days ago

Looks good. A fun little tote and I think the handle is fantastic.

I also have good news. I don’t think you cut too deep with the marking knife as you said for this photo.

I think (at least from the photo) that the split failure of the wood along the grain line. Dovetails work great for end grain to end grain joinery, but they don’t work so well for end grain to long grain. To increase their potential for success on end grain to long grain, we have to use narrower pins (on the end grain) and wider tails on the long grain to take advantage of the longer run of long grain.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9231 posts in 1587 days


#5 posted 1280 days ago

Swirt, first the wood did not split, it’s only a splint. Second Ahhhh!!! yes I should have read my book more carefull… I was to occupied designing. Thank you. I learn therefore I am, sometimes I wish I was more… ;-)
Jorge, yes soon I will try to make bets with you, I’m a real hustler! No the truth is that one year ago, I had only one or two hand planes, but I have had my eyes open for many years as a architect. And it really was my first dove tails.
Dennis, what do you mean humor? Are you pulling my leg? I’m not funny at all, it’s serious buisness.
Patron, I made another tote in Paris, but not as fancy…
This one I belive is so fancy that I can take it for a walk to the queens garden…
Rance, thank you.
Best thoughts – the hustler of dove tails,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1084 posts in 1357 days


#6 posted 1280 days ago

Mafe,

Great tote!

I like the trenails you made from the branch scraps. I’m sure you’ll use then on another project very soon.

Life may be serious business but it’s essential that we have fun along the way…

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View mafe's profile

mafe

9231 posts in 1587 days


#7 posted 1280 days ago

Thank you Herb.
When I now had to use the wood in this direction, then I can see the point in makeing the side tails small, and then the cross grain big. I have learned a lesson. Thank you Swirt.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9231 posts in 1587 days


#8 posted 1280 days ago

I have a feeling I’m better off with MaFe, but I do like short names:
MaFe, Mad(s), Mad F, Mads, the: dovetail hustler, president of the GBOC, fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.
I laugh big time, I will think about this in a 1000 dove tails.
Smile,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Napoleon's profile

Napoleon

786 posts in 1307 days


#9 posted 1280 days ago

Wonderefull toolbox you havr made there,and such a pleasure to read about :)

Well done mr Mfdfva ;)

-- Boatbuilder&blacksmith

View mafe's profile

mafe

9231 posts in 1587 days


#10 posted 1280 days ago

Man for doing folish vacation adventures?

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Napoleon's profile

Napoleon

786 posts in 1307 days


#11 posted 1280 days ago

Mads felding dovetail and there its goes wrong….i wrote the letters wrong cause was in a hurry so no wonder you cant gues it..:(

Its was the meaning with one letter from each word and bla bla i am a fool. :D

-- Boatbuilder&blacksmith

View swirt's profile

swirt

1912 posts in 1470 days


#12 posted 1280 days ago

LOL Don’t thank me too much (I don’t want it to turn to blame later). ;) The narrow pins wide tails combination is not a recipe for a strong long-grain to end-grain joint, just stronger than having equal size pins and tails.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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