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Deep stop for a Record 50 / 43 ( Stanley) BLOG.

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Blog entry by mafe posted 05-23-2010 08:03 PM 2344 reads 3 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hi all…
Here I am again, have some time since I’m in Paris visiting my fionce who is French.

Deep stop for Record No. 43 / 50 plane (Stanley)
Perhaps a smiths project… (at least silver smith).
Here are also a blog of how to make wooden fence: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/15855

Ok I admit! It was not clever of me, I did not see that the deep stop was missing on the 43 I bought on E-bay. But the seller was nice and gave me a 4 pound discount on a price that was 13, so I was still happy.

So this little walk thrugh or tutorial is how to make a new! (I’ll add some specifications on size later).

1fence_record
Cutting some long brass bars and a brass rod into lenght (I made them a little longer).
The small are from one layer, and the long from two, to copy the originals.

2fence_record
Since I only had some threaded rod, I had to file it fown a little to fit the fence, this was done quick and easy in the drill press. (Make sure not to take too much, you need a snug fit).

3fence_record
In the back you see the originals I had from my No. 50, and in front the parts cut into lenght.
Take your pen and draw in the patern on the pieces.

4fence_record
Then it’s time for some cutting, this can naturally be done by hand, but I’m a little lazy.
Do not cut too close to the line, it’s better to make the final adjustments later.

5fence_record
Some sanding, to get a little closer. (and water not to get your fingers burned).

6fence_record
Parts ready now, time to find a fitting drill for the rods.

7fence_record
Now time for some marking and remember to pre mark the holes, so the drill will not slip.
I choose to drill all the way thrugh the plate on the single layered, and through the first ‘only’ on the longer two layerd once.

8fence_record
Time to silver solder, it’s not too hard, use some fluss, silver solder and a burner, clean first the items carfully.
Be carefull not to over heat this will melt the brass. You can put small pieces of solder along the object sides, then it’s easier to control.
In the back of the soldering you can see the pieces ready with holes (forgot to picture the drilling).
Here are a link for how to silver solder on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J95soMXxhNc&feature=related

9fence_record
And viola! Soldered – yes I can defenetly use some training hours of this… But I have to use just more time after to file.

10fence_record
So time to get away all that silver solder that was so expensive… Filing and sanding those bumps away.

11fence_record
File the sides flat, and the little side on the long deep stops.

12fence_record
Sanding until you are happy (or as me patience runs out).

13fence_record
Time for a polish to make sure we get a smooth ride on the wood, do not be lazy here, this is what are important.

14fence_record
And here we are: 1 set of each lenght for my 3 planes.
Job done!

Extra:


I work mm so you will have to convert if you want to work inches.
http://www.industrial-enclosures.com/html/conversion-mm-inch.html

Hope it can be usefull to others,
best thoughts,
MaFe

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.



12 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112936 posts in 2330 days


#1 posted 05-23-2010 08:21 PM

Nice blog lots great photos showing each step.very well detailed and explained

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1868 days


#2 posted 05-23-2010 10:17 PM

Hej Mads
it´s another great picturebook you have done thank´s
I think you explain the step by step in your how to do blogs very well
ceep let them come it´s great to see some solutions for those kind of things
we normely don´t count as woodworking
but today it´s deffently nessery to be able of doing this kind of things by your self

enjoy your little vacation in Paris
hope you can find some old tools down there

Dennis

View mafe's profile

mafe

9690 posts in 1842 days


#3 posted 05-24-2010 12:52 PM

Thank you, I used to teach constructing architects and I acually find it funny to make these little how to’s.
Yes I tryed to buy a deep stop, but was not able to fine a place where this was possible.
Found one on E-bay at only twise the price of the plane.
To make a smith make me one will be 5 times the price of the plane.
So!
Be creative, and enjoy.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2087 days


#4 posted 05-24-2010 02:49 PM

Great blog Mads. Knowing a little about metal work is a great asset for a woodworker to have. I have learned a little over the years, but not nearly enough, so I appreciate your efforts to teach us a few tricks. Thank you. Hope you are enjoying your stay in Paris.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9690 posts in 1842 days


#5 posted 05-24-2010 10:14 PM

Autumn, this was the best I could hear, now I know for sure it was worth making the blog.
Write me all you want for questions.
Thank you.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View reef's profile

reef

5 posts in 1131 days


#6 posted 11-21-2011 03:50 PM

Thanks for your post I have the same problem, but I haven’t the size of the fence, can you post it PLZ.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9690 posts in 1842 days


#7 posted 11-21-2011 05:50 PM

Reef, is it the deepstops you mean?
Then I can go and measure trhem for you.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View reef's profile

reef

5 posts in 1131 days


#8 posted 11-22-2011 10:02 AM

The “G” element http://www.tooltrip.com/tooltrip9/stanley/comb-planes/50man.pdf “beading gauge”.
If you can do It, I can solve my problem.

Has anyone tried “durafix” or “castolin” with steel or aluminum? It seems easy to use.

Thanks Bye

View mafe's profile

mafe

9690 posts in 1842 days


#9 posted 11-22-2011 04:01 PM

I work mm so you will have to convert if you want to work inches.
http://www.industrial-enclosures.com/html/conversion-mm-inch.html
Merry Christmas.
Smiles,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View reef's profile

reef

5 posts in 1131 days


#10 posted 11-22-2011 04:16 PM

Thanks a lot! In mm is fine I’m Italian.
Thank you again.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9690 posts in 1842 days


#11 posted 11-22-2011 04:46 PM

Cool Reef, here pictures of details.
You are welcome.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View reef's profile

reef

5 posts in 1131 days


#12 posted 11-22-2011 05:49 PM

Thanks for your help. With the new pictures I understand why those dimensions.
I think the next thing you’ll need to redo are the spurs. These are important, but almost disappeared.

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