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Jointer #1: My first jointer

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Blog entry by mIps posted 04-10-2016 04:48 AM 875 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Jointer series Part 2: De-rusting »

Well, my tried-and-true method failed me today. Usually, whenever I think I might go yard-sale or garage-sale looking, I am sure to take at least five to ten dollars with me to ward off anything that I might find interesting and, until today, it’s worked. I carry money, I see nothing interesting that I want or need.
But, today, I was carrying $15 and found a old craftsman 6” jointer that the owner was willing to sell me for $50. So, now I am the owner.
It needs some attention and love but, for the price, I couldn’t pass it up. my garage is getting alarmingly full.

Will post pics when I get the chance.

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.



11 comments so far

View NormG's profile

NormG

5506 posts in 2469 days


#1 posted 04-10-2016 05:19 AM

Congrats, should clean up nicely

-- Norman - I never never make a mistake, I just change the design.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3392 posts in 1669 days


#2 posted 04-10-2016 05:24 AM

What a tease you are…..no pictures how could you!

I dont know of any woodworker that would gloat about a great deal on a jointer and not post pictures,unless
of course he was smoking one !!
Tee hee!

-- Regards Robert

View mIps's profile

mIps

187 posts in 1519 days


#3 posted 04-10-2016 03:47 PM

Here’s a quick pic to prove it did happen. According to the plate, it is a Sears Craftsman model 113.206931 which I know is older and not really the greatest. But it came with a motor, not sure what power, and a mobile base for it that it’s not currently on. The deck needs to be scrubbed and waxed, the knife cylinder had some surface rust, the knives need to be sharpened and basically EVERYTHING needs to be cleaned and lubricated. But, it’s more than I had before and I am happy about that. Looking forward to using it.

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.

View TraylorPark's profile

TraylorPark

151 posts in 1063 days


#4 posted 04-10-2016 10:27 PM

I just picked up one of these a couple weeks ago too. I’ve used it a few times with variable success. Shorter boards are pretty much dead on, but longer than about 3 feet and I get some bulge in the middle. The motor on mine is a 1/2 horse inductions that runs like a top and I found a place on line to get new knives that work great for $17. Drop me line if you want the knife info. Enjoy the tool and if you learn anyway to improve the accuracy with longer stock be sure to let me know.

-- --Zach

View mIps's profile

mIps

187 posts in 1519 days


#5 posted 04-10-2016 11:25 PM

When you say bulge, do you mean that the middle part of the board is thicker than the ends? If so, what are you using to keep firm pressure on the board as you joint it? Seems like the weight of the ends could be ‘pulling’ the center up and away from the knives. Speaking of knives, yes, info please and thank you.

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3392 posts in 1669 days


#6 posted 04-10-2016 11:41 PM

OK got it and a nice find to boot

its a great looking machine, and as long as you do not overdo the length of the timber, an overhang of about 1/3 of the length should be OK it will work well.

A jointer would have to be one of the few Items that once set up should not be moved or mobile, unless the floor surface is spot on, as by moving it around you risk the co planer surfaces becoming effected and refelected in the results.

Be prepared to spend quite some time (hours) setting up when you first replace the blades, again this time spent will refelect in the results.

Enough from me!

Enjoy your new find

-- Regards Robert

View mIps's profile

mIps

187 posts in 1519 days


#7 posted 04-11-2016 01:19 AM

Oh yes, I know it’s going to be a project (just what I need) but I think it will be worth it in the end.

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.

View TraylorPark's profile

TraylorPark

151 posts in 1063 days


#8 posted 04-11-2016 10:33 AM

I’m almost certain you are correct in the assessment that the ends are pulling the middle away form the blades. I guess I’ll work on my technique and try to use the shortest boards possible. Here is a link for the knives.

-- --Zach

View mIps's profile

mIps

187 posts in 1519 days


#9 posted 04-11-2016 03:00 PM

Zach, maybe you could have a table or bench to roll into place when you’re jointing and then roll out of the way when not?

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.

View mIps's profile

mIps

187 posts in 1519 days


#10 posted 04-11-2016 05:41 PM

okay, so, first real question. What is the possibility of moving the motor (this one or a different one) up closer to the body of the jointer so that I could put this thing on a shallower base / stand. I’m contemplating a wooden cabinet of some kind but don’t know if it’s reasonable / feasible / a good idea to do so.

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.

View TraylorPark's profile

TraylorPark

151 posts in 1063 days


#11 posted 04-11-2016 07:34 PM

Moving the motor shouldn’t be a problem at all. Just make sure the spindles align and get a shorter belt. I too am thinking of this for mine and plan on using a link belt, and creating a chip chute to hook a DC up to.

-- --Zach

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