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Split Roubo Workbench #22: The Gap Stop

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Blog entry by lysdexic posted 650 days ago 3719 reads 4 times favorited 31 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 21: The Bottom Shelf and some Dawg Holes Part 22 of Split Roubo Workbench series Part 23: Dogs by Design. »

Hello,

I felt a little stuck here. The remaining maple lumber that I had was milled 4/4 stuff obviously from a different tree/species and very white. I wanted the gap stop to match the rest of the top. Primarily as to not draw attention to itself and leave a more monolithic look to the bench top. Rick, the lumber guy did not have any boards left of the wood used to make the top wide enough to do the job. So, it is time to glue up some scraps. I rough jointed 2 surfaces with my #8. I really like this plane. The finished with a finely set #7.

Time to empty the bleachers.

Unfortunately, after milling these two boards I was still just shy of the width I needed so i jointed and glued on another board. It was this last small board that I was having trouble jointed because it was bowed. I tried to grab hold and clamp it with screws. The screw broke and that didn’t work with a damn.

Finally, I resawed this board and went to mill these to their final 5/8” thickness. I noticed that my fairly new DeWalt 735 is leaving ridges. WTF? I forgot to take out the broken screw from the day before. Sucks.

Got to press on. From a design aspect, I decided to cap the gapstop with a cherry cap using a M&T joint. One reason is to match the other end cap. The other is because by the time I glued up this board, resawed it, the laiminated the spacer there would be 7 different pieces of end grain exposed.

A cut off was laminated and fashioned into a tenon. The spacers were also cut-offs.

The cherry cap was fashioned from a previous leg cut-off, cut to size and mortised. The laminated tenon was just at 1/2” so a 1/2” brad point bit hogged out the waste nicely. The rest was pared with a chisel. Like my fancy drill press table. I reallly need to make one that is attached and has a dependable fence.

I shaped rounded the corners of the tenon using a rasp. Before fitting the cap, I had to re-square the shoulders from the glue up. The tenon is a bit long and was shortened. The cap was intentionally cut a tad large. I do not trust the accuracy of my machine work. Jonters, planers and routers get me most of the way there but I achieve my accuracy by sneaking up on a good fit using hand tools.

My M&T fit was a tad loose or at least I used that as an excuse to drawbore this joint. I had a couple cherry pegs left over from the under-carriage construction. I chose 5/16” for these pegs. Thus, I removed some bulk with a block plane and then slammed them back through the dowel plate. I enjoy making pegs. Its the simple things.

Finally, I cut the notches on the bottom so the gap stop will straddle the upper stretchers and lie flush with the top. Elbow in, reflection straight, parallel lines.

Various pictures of the final result.

Thanks for following along.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali



31 comments so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5257 posts in 1200 days


#1 posted 650 days ago

Ahh, beautiful, heart warming progress. Very envious of the build. What type of projects are you eyeing up for after this beast is done?

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4752 posts in 1179 days


#2 posted 650 days ago

That’s some clean work Lysdexic! Thanks
for posting your progress and congratulations on
an outstanding work bench.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

4508 posts in 894 days


#3 posted 650 days ago

I like it. Nice work

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4779 posts in 1225 days


#4 posted 650 days ago

Shane,

I already bought a slab walnut that I hope to fashion into a Krenov styled cabinet. It is for my wife to hold her necklaces.

Simple, understated design.
Golden proportions

I just dont know how to do it. I dont really want to buy a plan but I dont know how to execute the joinery and hinges.

Maybe something like this where the form and grain do the talking.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4779 posts in 1225 days


#5 posted 650 days ago

This is where I left off tonight -putting a coat of finish on the bottom of the top. I guess I will get used to the darker color but for right now I don’t like it.

To Do List:

Re-bolt top right side up.
Flatten top
Finish top surface
Make dogs
Accessorize

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5257 posts in 1200 days


#6 posted 650 days ago

Will it have a base? I like his works that sit on legs with nice lines. Maybe in a contrasting wood. I am sure there is a lot of info out there on how to do those type of hinges. I have never tried them, but they are cool in their simplicity. I am sure she will like it.

View Brit's profile

Brit

5107 posts in 1445 days


#7 posted 650 days ago

Looks good to me Scott. Send it my way if you don’t like the colour.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4137 posts in 1553 days


#8 posted 650 days ago

Love it, Scott! You’ve really set the standard high with this bench.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9599 posts in 1220 days


#9 posted 650 days ago

Wow, what’s not to like there, Scott? Beautiful stuff. Nice work.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4760 posts in 2484 days


#10 posted 650 days ago

Very very nice Scott.
A true labor of love.

I like the darker color myself.
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View Don W's profile

Don W

14652 posts in 1170 days


#11 posted 650 days ago

Scott, I love your attention to detail. I wish I had your patience.

Great blog once again.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6749 posts in 1753 days


#12 posted 650 days ago

Very nice, great call on making the ends continuous with no space, I also like the cherry end cap.

The color is a little darker than expected but I think it will grow on you.

I like where you have your table saw, that’s where I’ve been putting mine so the bench acts as an outfeed table.

The to do list is getting very short! Wont be long now.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Don W's profile

Don W

14652 posts in 1170 days


#13 posted 650 days ago

I’m sure the “bench as an outfeed” will work for you guys. I’d wind up knocking a handplane on the floor, and man…....profanity!!!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9599 posts in 1220 days


#14 posted 650 days ago

^ +1 for what Don says. I keep electric tools a safe distance from my workbench for that very reason. :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6749 posts in 1753 days


#15 posted 650 days ago

My planes will be sitting below the surface in the tool tray ;-)

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

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