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Split Roubo Workbench #19: The Deadman

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Blog entry by lysdexic posted 08-08-2012 02:14 AM 6175 reads 5 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 18: Attaching the top Part 19 of Split Roubo Workbench series Part 20: The Deadman - Capitulo Dos »

In designing the deadman I realized that I would need to sacrifice/mill a huge piece of cherry. I only have one piece left and I don’t think I need to use it.

Instead I decided to use 3 pieces like Kari Hultman

I modified the TWW plan and got some scrap pieces together. I milled the end pieces as one. After flattening one side with a #7 it was re-saw on the bandsaw.

I didn’t take pics while routing the mortises. After that was done, the piece was cross cut in half. One side got a rabbet for the top. The other recieved a 45 degree V cut for the bottom.

NOTE: the piece that has the rabbet still has some checks. Any advise on how to seal/stabilize these?

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Next, in order to measure directly for the vertical element, I went ahead and made the V track. I dreaded making this and I don’t know why. I figured the safest way would cut a larger piece with a V. That way it is easy to clamp for planing and easier to hold while ripping that piece off at the TS.

After I cut the first corner off to make the V I realized I could have just corner off a square board to begin with! Duh! Oh well.

This piece ended up having a lot of curl and character. The sharp points are chamfered.

I love it when you can see a reflection off a planed surface.

After cutting it to basic length the shooting board helps sneak up on a perfect fit. {For any one who reads this and is thinking of making a shooting board. The bench hook/miter box that I made at the same time with the same dimensions works great as a helper.}

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Next, cutting the tenons on the vertical piece. I like to cut the shoulders on the TS. Using the fence with a stop i can quickly achieve consistent depth and square cuts. The cheeks are cut with my only working “tenon” saw – the LN DT saw. This went really well as the tenons required minimal work for a nice fit.

WHOOPS.

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This is where things stand tonight.

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Thoughts from here:

The face of the deadman is not coplanar with the legs and top. The contributing dimensions followed the plan. Don’t know if this is critical.

I still need to cut the curves out as seen by the pencil marks. This design element echos the curve in the chop.

The slight reveal between the capitals and the vertical is on purpose. The original dimensions of the vertical element are a little bulky. I am considering thinning it by a half inch on each side. However, I don’t want the deadman to be over refined compared to the rest of the bench.

Drill 2 rows of 3/4” holes at 1/2” offset

Draw bore each end

The tongue of the upper rabbet is too short. I will glue a piece on since we’re working with long grain. Jatoba for better wear characteristics? Nah, probably over kill.

Need to epoxy the checks.

Thanks for following along. I am sure you guys are getting as fatigued with this blog as I am. Gotta finish it though.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali



15 comments so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5409 posts in 1315 days


#1 posted 08-08-2012 02:23 AM

Great job, the cat looks like it approves, as do I. And they said it would take a year!

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4887 posts in 1340 days


#2 posted 08-08-2012 02:32 AM

This picture was taken March 10, almost 5 months ago.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6867 posts in 1869 days


#3 posted 08-08-2012 04:12 AM

That deadman is going to looks sweet, I like the coves, it will look very romanesque without being too flashy. Between the vise chop and the coves in the deadman it will look like a beadrock!

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2362 posts in 1497 days


#4 posted 08-08-2012 10:18 AM

Gee only 5 months ago it was “just” lumber ;-)
Fells like a certain #4 on my bench..lol..
Scott you’re doing an awsome job !
love it !

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4891 posts in 2599 days


#5 posted 08-08-2012 12:52 PM

This is just a fantastic blog to follow.
And your galootness keeps popping up. Cool.

What a wonderful job,
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View Dave's profile

Dave

11189 posts in 1557 days


#6 posted 08-09-2012 02:20 AM

Scott you have done a masterful job and need to be commended. Well Done!
This is a wonderful build.
I would leave the checks, the gives it character. Just treat it as you do the rest of the bench and periodically check on it for added treatment. IMHO
Great Job.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4887 posts in 1340 days


#7 posted 08-09-2012 02:56 AM

Thanks for the comments all.

Dave, so you think I should just leave the checks? There presence kind of surprised me and right at an area subject bending stresses normal to the axis of the check.

Mauricio – thanks for using the word cove. I have a lot to learn about the language of design.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Dave's profile

Dave

11189 posts in 1557 days


#8 posted 08-09-2012 03:29 AM

I would leave them open and watch them thought the next few seasons. See if they move then if so address the issue.
Lightly fill the check with candle wax and that will give you a good visual of the movement.
IMHO

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4887 posts in 1340 days


#9 posted 08-09-2012 03:35 AM

Sounds reasonable. Thanks for the candle wax tip Sir.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Brit's profile

Brit

5279 posts in 1560 days


#10 posted 08-09-2012 08:55 AM

Almost there Scott. Bring it on home baby!

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6867 posts in 1869 days


#11 posted 08-09-2012 09:12 PM

I just read the free chapter of the moulding planes book that Lost Art Press is putting out, picked up some new vocabulary words.

I think Scott is already done and just sandbagging on us.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4887 posts in 1340 days


#12 posted 08-10-2012 02:29 AM

Mauricio, I have not taken the time to read that chapter. Is it worth the time? I just don’t know if I will ever achieve that level of galootness.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6867 posts in 1869 days


#13 posted 08-10-2012 02:15 PM

I enjoyed the chapter, it was very interesting, I really like how they decompose every possible shape starting out with rabbets that then guide the hollows and rounds. And you learn a little architectural lingo while your at it..

He also shows you that you don’t need the whole set, you can do most anything with two pairs of hollows and rounds. The problem is that I don’t make period furniture, and moldings are not much in style these days. We are more into the pottery barn style rustic furniture with the blotchy brown finish and indistinguishable wood type.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4887 posts in 1340 days


#14 posted 08-11-2012 02:28 AM

Mauricio,

Don’t feel bad. Well, you never said that you did so I guess that is a Freudian slip. I feel bad because I also like the C&B style. Even worse I like PB as well. But then again, I think that I have admitted to being a hopeless, suburban yuppie.

I my defense, however, I have never been to an IKEA.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6867 posts in 1869 days


#15 posted 08-11-2012 02:22 PM

Yeah, also Pier One and World Market, its all pretty similar. Its all made of Rubber wood which I had to look up. wikipedia says it used to be just burned but now because of the decline in standards it is now used for furniture.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

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