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Split Roubo Workbench #15: Leg Vise - The BenchCrafted version.

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Blog entry by lysdexic posted 07-17-2012 01:56 AM 8210 reads 3 times favorited 32 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 14: The Chop - updated Part 15 of Split Roubo Workbench series Part 16: Leg Vise - The Chain Leg Vise version. »

Howdy,

The left front leg requires a lot more development in order to turn it into a leg vise. The first step is to make a clearance mortise for the parallel guide. It needs to be nice and square so I routed to max depth and squared the corners. However, even routing from both sides I don’t have enough depth. The trusty brace and bit to the rescue.

It ain’t perfect but will do just fine.

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The vise nut. The plan calls for a flush mount …........

TWW inlays the flange. However, that got me thinking. I am losing some excursion with my extra thick legs at 5 3/8” versus the planned 3 1/2”. So I decided, after the fact, to turn the nut around and completely inlay the nut.

However, Ive already drilled for the screw and this makes a counter bore difficult. So, the leg set back on the drill press and the first bit centered. Then the counter bore for the barrel drilled. Finally the flange is inlay-ed using a router.

Finally, the hole is tapped and the nut is installed. This configuration allows for a inch or so more chop travel

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The acetal bushing is installed on the front face of the leg in a similar fashion: Marked, routed, corners squared, screw holes tapped.

Its a hair too deep but that’s OK.

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Finally, the roller brackets.

Fortunately, the cut-off from the chop was damn near the perfect size. A 1/16” was planed off and everything laid out.

Slots routed, holes drilled and tapped. This was a done on a larger piece and then they were divided.

Next, I went along with the plan and added some decorative details using primarily the bandsaw. I forgot to take pics. Finished with a little sanding and applied some mineral spirits just to check out how they’d look.

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The pieces are assembled and tuned. You guys have seen the BenchCrafted leg vise in action. It is wonderful hardware with a smooth action.

You may note the parallel guide is only temporarily pegged because now I will disassemble most everything and “retro-fit” the chain drive.

I really appreciate you guys following along and the encouraging words!

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali



32 comments so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5456 posts in 1353 days


#1 posted 07-17-2012 02:17 AM

Another step closer. Keep up the good work. What hurdles are left? Seems like you got it pretty well whooped at this point. Look forward to more, as always

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10397 posts in 1373 days


#2 posted 07-17-2012 02:32 AM

My gosh, the level of total precision is amazing… Matched only by the execution…

Wow, that’s amazing work, Scott. Congrats, you’re almost there!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4892 posts in 1378 days


#3 posted 07-17-2012 02:35 AM

Shane,

Just off the top of my head…..

Make dowels for draw bore
draw bore pin
mill and construct deadman
legder strips
deadman glide strip
make real dogs
cut legs a half inch shorter
make hinges and casters for left legs
assemble the base
drill top for spax screws
flax seed oil the wheels?
drill 3/4” holes in rear slab for hold fasts
mill and assemble plane stop
level top -hand planes or router sled
mill, cut and lap boards for shelf
apply finish – what kind?
give to Al

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5456 posts in 1353 days


#4 posted 07-17-2012 02:40 AM

So…you will be done by tomorrow evening, that is what it sounds like to me?

View Brit's profile

Brit

5313 posts in 1598 days


#5 posted 07-17-2012 06:49 AM

You’re just having too much fun if you ask me. Great work as usual.

Looking at you To Do list, there are a couple of items that confuse me.

  1. Make hinges and casters for left legs.
  2. flax seed oil the wheels? Are you really going to do that?
  3. level top – hand planes or router sled? Surely it will be hand planes?

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15585 posts in 1322 days


#6 posted 07-17-2012 11:50 AM

some nice work going on there.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4892 posts in 1378 days


#7 posted 07-17-2012 11:59 AM

Andy,

My dedicated shop space is small. I will need to move my bench at times. Not exactly sure when but I am sure that I will. Therefore, I am trying to devise a way to put casters on one side so that I can lift the other side and drag/roll the bench. I thought about these from Rockler but I am not sure of their durability.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Brit's profile

Brit

5313 posts in 1598 days


#8 posted 07-17-2012 12:23 PM

Scot – At the beginning of 2011 I spent 2 months designing and sourcing the parts for an undercarriage for Benchcrafted’s Split-Top Roubo. When the undercarriage is up, the bench looks just like an ordinary Split-Top Roubo even if you kneel down on the floor and look underneath. When it is down, the bench is raised an inch or so off the floor. I had to draw on my engineering background and went through a number of ideas before arriving at my final design. I invested all the time and effort because my workshop is only 9ft x 9ft and I want a 6ft bench. I have to be able to move it easily because I will be moving it often. I’m not going to reveal how it works until I make my Roubo, but it will happen one day though I promise.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Boatman53's profile

Boatman53

848 posts in 951 days


#9 posted 07-17-2012 12:51 PM

Ok Brit, now your just playing with use.

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

View Brit's profile

Brit

5313 posts in 1598 days


#10 posted 07-17-2012 01:00 PM

Believe it or not, I do feel bad that I can’t share it with you yet. In my defense though, I do share most things with you guys, but you have to leave me something to showcase with my Roubo when I build it. Otherwise it will be (YAWN YAWN) just another Split Top Roubo.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4892 posts in 1378 days


#11 posted 07-17-2012 01:09 PM

Agree Jim. Andy is usually so forthcoming with poignant, valuable information. That is a HUGE tease. But I guess he is entitled.

Question #2:

I have a bad problem with rust to the point that when I went to retrieve the large BC hand wheel from its box, it had already rusted! It was a light rust thst the 3M scothbrite removed. However, it is discouraging. Everthing I touch oxidizes. Thus, I am intrigued by Jameel’s blog post on how to seal the wheels with flax oil. Basically, the technique involves coating the wheels with flax oil then baking. The resultant wheels have a brown finish like so…....

I have not quite decided but will probably just paste wax and perform periodic maintenance.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View sb194's profile

sb194

180 posts in 1773 days


#12 posted 07-17-2012 01:26 PM

Looking great. I can’t wait to see the finished bench.

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4892 posts in 1378 days


#13 posted 07-17-2012 02:12 PM

Sorry for the multiple post but I have just sporadic moments to post.

Question #3

Leveling the top: Don’t call me Shirley :^)

I am not so sure that I am going to use handplanes. It will depend on how flat it is when I get through. The top will end up 14 sq ft. That is alot of real estate and ample room for error. Milling 6 square with handplanes requires a bit of skill which I am trying to develop. Unfortunately I have found myself chasing my tail while leveling stock. I am not so sure that I want to screw up my top.

I know it sounds blasphemous. One can argue that it will a great learning experience to flatten the top with a #7. But you know ,it is also a great learning experience to flatten a slab with a router sled. Both of which I’ve never done before.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4892 posts in 1378 days


#14 posted 07-17-2012 02:33 PM

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10397 posts in 1373 days


#15 posted 07-17-2012 02:40 PM

I saw that coming… :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

showing 1 through 15 of 32 comments

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