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Split Roubo Workbench #12: The Rails

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Blog entry by lysdexic posted 793 days ago 2902 reads 3 times favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 11: The Legs - part II Part 12 of Split Roubo Workbench series Part 13: The Parallel Guide »

With the legs done it is time to move on to the rails. I have milled these guys during the milling process. The tenons are different for each type of rail (e.g. botttom long, bottom short, and top short. Thus, I took extra care in getting them marked up.

I didn’t take pics but I cut the tenons using the table saw and a dado stack. Well the first one I cut ended up too loose. Just a little but it wasn’t right. So i go into repair mode.

The other 11 tenons went well except maybe the fact the probably over corrected and left too much bulk on all tenons. I did alot of sneaking up on each fit. Thank goodness I don’t do this for a living because I would surely starve.

Since the moritises are done with a router I need to round over the tenons. First I undercut with my flush cut saw.

Then I would round over the base with a chisel. Next, Bevel the corners at a 45 with the course side if the Shinto rasp. Then further round with the fine side if the Shinto rasp. THis is the first time that I’ve had the opportunity to use this rasp and i was quite please with its performance. The certainly removes material fast and effeciently. However, it is not a finishing rasp as the resultant surface is fairly rough even on the “fine” side.

The completed tenon…..

Sneaking up on the fit. A little aggressive with the rounding over but that doesn’t effect the fit.

One by one they are coming together. On the top rail, I left some extra material so I can plane down flush witht the leg shoulders.

Now back to the repair. I just need a few thousandths to make it snug. I don’t have a tenon saw so stated with a DT saw. You can see the sliver of scabbed material. THen fished it off with a X-cut saw.

After getting that final tenon to fit, the groove for the self leger was dado’d into the bottom rails.

THe base is ready for draw boring and assembly!!

Next up is the leg vise then I’ll be getting close to putting the baby together. Thanks for stopping by.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali



22 comments so far

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1494 posts in 903 days


#1 posted 793 days ago

Fit like a pro, nicely done.

Bench is lookin’ great. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View Brit's profile

Brit

5125 posts in 1474 days


#2 posted 793 days ago

Nice save on the tenon Scott. I’m starting to drool now.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9491 posts in 1720 days


#3 posted 793 days ago

Thanks for sowing all the fine details, even the repair, this is as important as the rest.
It is going to be a dream bench.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4800 posts in 1254 days


#4 posted 793 days ago

I discovered something interesting about the Sawstop doing the tenons.

When you turn the Sawstop ON there are 2 led lights at the switch that give status. Solid green and you are good to go. If the red one flashes it corresponds to an error code. Well, if the saw is ON but not running and you touch the blade with your finger or anything conductive, the red light will flash and the flip paddle switch will not start the blade turning.

You can use this to your advantage. I set my combo square to the desired height and then place that on the table hovering over the blade. Then raise the blade until the red light flashes. Your are exactly at the specified height. Its a nice little convenience.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9799 posts in 1249 days


#5 posted 793 days ago

Some fine work with rasp and saw, Scott! I do have a question, re: ‘groove for the self leger.’ what is a self leger? This groove looks like it’s where a shelf might be. i’ve not heard fhe term before…

Almost there, and looking oh-so-fine!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Don W's profile

Don W

14869 posts in 1199 days


#6 posted 793 days ago

ok, having never really paid attention to a sawstop up close what does “ON but not running” mean. My saw is either on or off.

Great detail in the blog. The bench is going to be superb. I can’t wait for the finished picture. Planes sitting on top of course.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View sb194's profile (online now)

sb194

175 posts in 1649 days


#7 posted 793 days ago

Awesome. That is all I can say. Can’t wait to see the finished bench.

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6805 posts in 1783 days


#8 posted 793 days ago

Looking good Scott, Stretchers are next on my to do list.

I hate the part of the project where you have to stop and fix mistakes, part of the process I guess.

Do you have to insert the shelves during the glue up? I guess we’ll see shortly.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4800 posts in 1254 days


#9 posted 793 days ago

The grooves/dado in the lower rails are just for better fixation and stability of the ledger to hold the shelving. The ledger will be glued into the dado. I guess this is in contrast to screwing a ledge straight on the face. The ledger actual can be glued in anytime.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4800 posts in 1254 days


#10 posted 793 days ago

Don,

As you know the Sawstop basically passes a current thru the blade. If anything changes the capacitance (eg a finger or metal or wet treated lumber) it is detected and an aluminum block is fired into the blade. yada yada.

So, it has some fancy circuitry. There are two switches. One turns it ON and it goes thru a system check which takes about 6 seconds if I had to guess. When it is good to go you get a steady green light. At that point, it operates as any other table saw.

Then there is a paddle switch which is the conventional ON/OFF switch and starts the blade.

While the blade is not turning you can touch the blade but the red light will flash and the paddle switch is disabled. Makes sense. This is where you raise the blade to touch the combo square. When the red light flashes the blade just touched and you are at the desired height. Pretty cool I thought.

It is all quite simple. It is harder to describe than to use.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Don W's profile

Don W

14869 posts in 1199 days


#11 posted 793 days ago

That makes sense. I figured it had something to do with the safety switch. I learned something today.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4800 posts in 1254 days


#12 posted 792 days ago

Smitty, did my corrected spelling in the subsequent post help?

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9799 posts in 1249 days


#13 posted 792 days ago

Yep, I understand, and it makes sense.

I’ll have to look at how I attached the shelf support boards / ledgers on my bench.

Wait, what am I saying?? The bloody thing is four inches to the floor and weighs 300+ pounds. Oh, well. :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View bhog's profile

bhog

2078 posts in 1321 days


#14 posted 792 days ago

Nice work Scott ,everything looks top notch.After following along your build its kind of making me want to build a REAL bench.Almost bought a bunch of 12/4 red birch the other day,but chickened out.It looks like it will be a beautiful piece when it is finished.

-- I don't drive a Prius.

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5289 posts in 1229 days


#15 posted 792 days ago

Just keeps getting better and better. Pretty darn fancy setup w/the saw stop. Car keys and the whole 9. Politics aside, that is one friggin’sweet saw and even better bench. Keep up the good work.

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