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Simple Veneered box #3: Part 3 - the top, bottom and outside

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Blog entry by lumberjoe posted 04-09-2013 at 07:26 AM 1584 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Trimmed and finished the inside Part 3 of Simple Veneered box series Part 4: Completed! »

I assembled the box walls using hot hide glue rub joints. since I had a seamless fit, no clamps were used. I was going to shoot some brads for additional strength but decided against it. After it sat for a day, I could not pull this box apart as it was. Short of using a spreader or mechanical advantage, these joints were going nowhere.

I then measured and cut the MDF for the top and bottom. After cut, I veneered what was to be the inside. One with the walnut I sliced on the bandsaw and one with bubinga. As with the sides, I taped off areas that were to receive glue and put down the initial coat of finish

I then hot hide glued the top and bottom on with rub joints again. I didn’t use clamps but I did wrap it with painters tape as I did not want the pieces to shift. It worked and they fit perfectly.

After that dried, I started to veneer the outside. This was a lot more difficult than doing a single piece. I normally leave a decent sized (1/16”) overlap on the veneer and trim it after it sets. This was not possible. I bought an offset veneer saw which made much more accurate cuts.

I didn’t take any pictures during the process, because it was quite messy (literally, my hands were covered in glue). I wrapped some painters tape around my veneer hammer because it kept gluing itself to my hands.

Here is how it sits now:

The nice thing about sequenced matched veneer is with careful cuts I was able to match the grain all the way around. I still need to sand it down, but I am happy with the veneer for now. No bubbles and no curling edges.

Next time around I think I am going to miter the corners of the veneer.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts



8 comments so far

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 885 days


#1 posted 04-09-2013 at 07:30 AM

Also there are a couple little chips missing from when I hammered it. Bubinga is tough to work with and tears out like crazy. I kept the chips and will stick them back down

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4942 posts in 1435 days


#2 posted 04-09-2013 at 07:59 AM

Glad to see you are enjoying the advantages of the hot hide glue. No clamp joints are the only way to go.
Don’t worry about the mess. First off, it cleans up with water and second it will diminish rapidly as you become used to working with it.

Good looking work.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Neal Ferri's profile

Neal Ferri

2 posts in 510 days


#3 posted 04-09-2013 at 01:27 PM

Very nice piece. Did you think of using a vacuum veneering bag?

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 885 days


#4 posted 04-09-2013 at 02:27 PM

Paul, a little water did take care of the mess. I should have been a little more patient and less ambitious, but I was excited to see the final product.

Neal, I have looked into it, but i enjoy the process of hammer veneering

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 885 days


#5 posted 04-09-2013 at 05:47 PM

I separated the top tonight and cut the veneer for the edges, I’ll apply it tomorrow then start finishing. I think the walnut under the lid is going to look pretty cool

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View stefang's profile

stefang

12973 posts in 1971 days


#6 posted 04-10-2013 at 05:17 AM

Thanks for posting this. I will be starting my first glue-up with hide glue, I hope in the not to distant future (gardening is keeping me out of the shop just now). Your hammer veneering came out great and this gives me hope that I can do it too. Wonderful to be able to make a strong box without having to do box, dovetail, or miter joints and still having it look so good. Also a great way to make several gift boxes quickly and get done on time for Christmas!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 885 days


#7 posted 04-10-2013 at 06:41 AM

Mike, hot hide glue is a pleasure to work with. I use it for just about everything. It’s exceptionally strong, reversible if need be, and does not require the use of clamps to get it’s strength. Also one of the biggest “selling” points for me is the fact it does not affect finishes like PVA glue does.

Hammer veneering is a lot of fun. I still have a lot to learn, but am getting much better with every piece I put down.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View stefang's profile

stefang

12973 posts in 1971 days


#8 posted 04-10-2013 at 08:47 AM

Thanks joe. I have about 4 lbs. of dry hide glue and all the other stuff needed, so I am really looking forward to working with it. I might get a chance this weekend as rain is predicted from Friday and throughout next week so I can get out of the garden and into the shop. I love rain!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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