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Blog entry by lugnut posted 1607 days ago 1030 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Well, I bit the bullet and purchased some equipment. I got an 8” jointer/planer combo from Jet and a 9” bandsaw from Skil. Probably none the best stuff, but live and learn. My goal here is to develop my woodworking skills to a higher level concentrating on guitar construction.

V guitar neck and wings.

The task at hand is to plane the wings to the same thickness as the neck. The wings are basswood and I’m thinking I should just get them ‘close’ to leave a little room for sanding. What do you guys think?

I would then need to joint the edges and then glue it all together and clamp it up. What glue should I use and would the ratcheting type clamps be sufficient to bind this guy up?

Thanks for now.



12 comments so far

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1389 posts in 2069 days


#1 posted 1607 days ago

sounds like the right approach. as far as glue goes, i would think that any regular wood glue would work – it doesnt need to be waterproof or anything. I wouldn’t use those clamps though, since they tend to be the weekest – i use those only for light duty, like holding things to jigs, etc. generally not for glue-ups. pretty much anything else would be fair game – F-style, pipe, etc.

View Jimthecarver's profile

Jimthecarver

1121 posts in 2390 days


#2 posted 1607 days ago

I dont know enough of the build process to advise on it. I will be watching your progress.
Good luck!

-- Can't never could do anything, to try is to advance.

View lugnut's profile

lugnut

14 posts in 1617 days


#3 posted 1593 days ago

I’ve got the planing,jointing and gluing done. I’m pretty happy with the 8” Jet Jointer/Planer I bought. Seems to be just the right size so far. The only thing I am alittle concerned about is that there are some raised lines in the wood that look like maybe there are some small nicks in the blade. Is this pretty much normal?

So next I need to d a little sanding. I don’t have a sander and I was thinking a palm sander would be best for the job? Any recommendations on one to get? I also need some input on what grades of sandpaper I shold use/get.

Glued Up

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1389 posts in 2069 days


#4 posted 1593 days ago

nice work. yes, those are probably from nicks in the blades. basically, you figure that the nicks are probably on both blades and so by loosening one and moving it a hairs width in either direction, you offset the nicks – that should solve that problem. I find that I dont even bother to do that, since it is not a finish-ready surface.

with regard to sanding, i think sanding is an inevitable part of woodworking. However, you can greatly minimize the amount of sanding you have to do by using hand tools – specifically bench planes. just a single block or smoothing plane in you tool collection would be very useful. with sanding you have to progress through the grits, but with blades you just go over it once and the surface is more beautiful than sandpaper can even achieve.

anyway, in the long run, i recommend trying a handplane on those little raised lines. for now, you’re just working on this one guitar, so I wouldnt even both with a powered sander. it’s small enough to do by hand – you’d have to do parts of it by hand anyway, like the neck. Just get a good brand of sandpaper, like norton or 3M (harbor freight and similar quality wood sandpaper SUCKS and should be avoided). I’d start with a 100 or 120 grit, since those surfaces are mostly good from the planer. make or buy a sanding block, and move through at least 150 grit. Where you stop depends on the type of finish you want. if the whole thing is going to be encased in poly or heavy laquer like a fender, 150 is probably fine. For a thinner finish, or just an oil finish you will probably want to go to 220 and maybe 1 step above that.

View lugnut's profile

lugnut

14 posts in 1617 days


#5 posted 1593 days ago

Aaron are you talking about using the hand plane over the entire surface? Or just to quickly level out then slight uneven areas of the joints and then sand?

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1389 posts in 2069 days


#6 posted 1593 days ago

both, really. i obviously cant tell from the pics, but in my experience those nicks leave ridges removable by a single pass over with a hand plane. the joints could need more, depending one how thick the two sides were planed to and how closely you aligned the faced during glue up. in either case there is just no way to get from “rough” cut (ie, from a jointer or planer) to finish faster than with a bench plane.

at the same time, if you didnt align the grain orientations across the piece, planing could be a little difficult. in that way, sanding eliminates the need to bother with grain orientation, for better or worse.

i just mention the hand planes because it seems like you’re just starting out, and when i was just starting i didn’t know it was an option. I went out and bought a nice motorized sander, which after discovering handplanes, i’ve barely used. balancing power tool use with hand tools is a great way to quickly move through the more boring stages of dimensioning lumber and more fully enjoy the construction and joinery processes. but for now i imagine you want to get through this project, and you can go to the hardware store, pick up a pack of sandpaper for $4 and “get er done.” ;-)

View lugnut's profile

lugnut

14 posts in 1617 days


#7 posted 1593 days ago

Well, I am learning but not particularly in any kind of rush. I just went to Lowe’s and got a Stanley hand planer.
Sand paper selection was slim so I got some 120 and 180 to use after learning how to plane.

I did not even think about aligning grain! Hope that doesn’t turn out to be an isue.

Thanks man!

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1389 posts in 2069 days


#8 posted 1593 days ago

no prob. didn’t know you were going to act so quickly! their sandpaper selection does suck, and you can find different grades of it all over the store. The “gator” brand is in the tools, and the 3M stuff is in the paint section.

as far as the plane goes, what kind did you get? the block plane or larger smoothing or jack type? chances are it is not anywhere near sharp enough out of the box, so you’ll have to sharpen it… which is its own can of worms :-) the easiest way, i think to get into that is by sharpening with sandpaper on glass (google “scary sharp”) using a jig like this guy. for that you will need wet/dry sandpaper that you CAN get at harbor frieght, or auto supply stores (i hear). and you thought it’d be simple!

View lugnut's profile

lugnut

14 posts in 1617 days


#9 posted 1593 days ago

Well, it just says Block Plane and 6-1/4” 60mm. It’s small, but even so I think I did a serviceable job leveling it out. Of course I learned a few things real quick. LOL

I’m thinking for what I’m doing that the larger one may have been a better choice. Cheaper too.

At any rate thanks for the heads up. I do believe this turned out better than sanding.

Now would a palm sander be a good investment for further sanding? I’m wanting to keep the surface as flat appearing as possible.

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1389 posts in 2069 days


#10 posted 1593 days ago

cool. the block plane is basically what you see – a shorter plane that is generally used with one hand, sometimes on non-horizontal/non-bench surfaces. ie, you can use it to trim a door to fit sort of thing. its guts are different than larger bench planes, and it’s not a heavy duty kind of thing. that said, a lot can be done with one, especially if it’s kept sharp.

by the way, when it comes to planes and chisels, sharp means, literally “razor sharp.” if you can shave with it, it’s sharp.

im not sure about a palm sander – like i said, i hardly use mine! it sort of depends what you want to do…are you planing on rounding the edges at all or doing some shaping? a rasp and file might be good for that, if you dont have a router. the nicholson “4 in 1” is handy and can replace 4 tools for light work. rounding edges with sandpaper is possible by machine, and even by hand, but it’s the last way i would ever want to go – you’ll be sanding forever.

finally, if you do sand, one way to keep it flat is by using a fairly firm sanding block.

View lugnut's profile

lugnut

14 posts in 1617 days


#11 posted 1593 days ago

Wow! You’re a handtool kinda guy huh? That 4-in-1 thing looks like it get me in trouble quick. LOL

The palm sanders I’ve looked at are what, 4+ inches square and flat. That seems to me like it would help in keeping a surface somewhat flat. Certainly better than my hand sanding. he he

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1389 posts in 2069 days


#12 posted 1593 days ago

yeah, the standard 1/4 sheet sized. how are you doing it by hand that is keeping it not flat?

as far as particular sanders, i have the porter cable model, and it works ok, its the only one i’ve used though and cant compare it to anything else. there are also random orbit sanders – more $, but from what i understand remove material faster and leave less noticeable wiggley scratches. something to keep in mind…

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