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Just for Fun... #85: Plotting and Scheming...

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Blog entry by littlecope posted 09-02-2014 10:07 PM 1586 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 84: Square Wood from Round Branches... Part 85 of Just for Fun... series Part 86: The Work continues... »

So a new project has begun, a Commissioned piece this time…
Until I receive permission, I’d rather not discuss all the details, but you clever bunch will pretty easily discern what is being made here…
Some Wood was secured, Bubinga that had been milled last Winter… When the two matched pieces were butted together, they seriously didn’t jibe, so trued ends were cut by marking and cutting them using a Square and Rule…

A good deal of Plotting and Scheming then ensued, to meet the asked for, and agreed upon terms…

One of the requirements, involves a curve… The normal shop “Curve” patterns (Coffee cans, old Records, Cups, Dishes, etc.) were not appropriate, so a quick Compass was fashioned…
First, a scrap with one straight edge was found and indexed to the center of the work piece…

Secondly, “Dimples” were made with the awl where the desired arc was to end…

Then the Awl was inserted through the swing arm of the Compass into the dimple, and an arc was scribed on the scrap piece from both directions…


Where the two scribed lines intersected another dimple was marked, the Awl and Pencil were reversed, and an Arc was plotted…

Except… The radius wasn’t long enough and the Pencil line ran right off the piece…
Another, longer swing arm was quickly fashioned, with multiple holes for “adjustment” purposes…
After six tries, acceptable results were finally achieved…

And then before I could work any further on this, something else had to be addressed… It involved this, a rare actual Wood purchase…

To receive some of that 1/2” Birch Plywood, Dadoes had to be routed…
And so they were, but not until a longer fence was made for the “Router Table”...


And that’s the adventure so far… I would like to be more specific about the details, and will, after Permission is given…
For the time being, the only hint I can give you is “Arrrr, harr, harr!”... :)

2 September 2014

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.



13 comments so far

View patron's profile

patron

13538 posts in 2807 days


#1 posted 09-02-2014 10:26 PM

darg nef thild

twepwi gluz !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View lew's profile

lew

11343 posts in 3221 days


#2 posted 09-02-2014 11:06 PM

Avast Ye Maties, Blackbeard Mike is at the helm!!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

3055 posts in 2968 days


#3 posted 09-02-2014 11:09 PM

Hey David, am I missing something?
Is there some trick to taking out Router Bits?
I always end up using Needle-nose Pliers, and it doesn’t do them much good…
Must be why dedicated Routers are so popular…

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

3055 posts in 2968 days


#4 posted 09-02-2014 11:15 PM

And Lew, more Graybeard these days me Matey!

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View Karson's profile

Karson

35035 posts in 3866 days


#5 posted 09-02-2014 11:56 PM

I usually loosen the chuck and they come right out.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View patron's profile

patron

13538 posts in 2807 days


#6 posted 09-02-2014 11:59 PM

they say to leave the bit somewhat ‘not seated’ (1/8”)
from pushing it all the way into the collet
when you loosen the collet
to change bits
just tap the end in to the collet
(not sideways)
it releases the ‘grip’
and you should be able to slide the old one out

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

3055 posts in 2968 days


#7 posted 09-03-2014 12:36 AM

Karson, I just picked up these about two months ago…

Before that, wrestling with channel locks, Vise grips, adjustable wrenches…

I’ll try it David, Thanks!

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7798 posts in 2769 days


#8 posted 09-03-2014 01:50 AM

i dont know why i dont see the usual hammer i always use, those wrenches you bought might work i guess, but with the holes in the end, it would be harder to hit..

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2800 days


#9 posted 09-03-2014 08:44 AM

Hi Mike. Looking forward to seeing what this mystery project will be.

The router chuck is designed so that the initial loosening doesn’t release the bit. Just continue loosening with your fingers until you meet resistance again, then use your wrench to finish loosening a 2nd time. As David said it is very important to not bottom out your bit when putting it into the router as it can come loose while working and it doesn’t do your collet any good either.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4167 posts in 2322 days


#10 posted 09-03-2014 12:01 PM

Improvisation the Mother of invention
Look forward to the reveal
Ever notice how the more problems the more enjoyable
the finished project becomes?
I’ve a small compression spring in all my routers 1/4” open.
A tooth brush with some solvent is always good before inserting
another bit keeps both the collets and shafts free from build up.

Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3393 posts in 1670 days


#11 posted 09-05-2014 07:34 AM

Router bits,

All router bits “should’ release upon slackening the collet.

Dont be too concerned if you need to turn it more to release bits able to be removed with the fingers.

As odd as it is ist some weird phenomen of collets.
However having ti use tools means the internalparts of the collet have been damaged.

This can occur by:-
1 Extending the shank to get the required height, meaning the bit shank is not installed with enough depth to hold it effectively through the collet, and as a result the internals may be damaged.

2 The collet has been worn and excessive tightening has contribuited to wear.

Effective fix:-

Well effecting a collet replacement will fix it A OK.

Hovever if thats not possible a close examination of whats actually causing the bits to be retained may be made and a repair effected.

-- Regards Robert

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

3055 posts in 2968 days


#12 posted 09-05-2014 03:14 PM

Thanks all…
The Router work is done, at least for the time being, so that’s not an issue right now…
The Work has been continuing, slowly, with lots of drilling…

Lots of cutting (here, showing my five cut system to imperfect box joints)...

And lots of ‘filing to fit’...

Unfortunately, I’m not going to have a lot of extra time this week to work on it but hey, it’s not a race… And I want to take my time and get it right anyway so, as they say, it’s all good…

I’m leaving the joints over-long this time for reasons which will become evident later… :)

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7798 posts in 2769 days


#13 posted 09-05-2014 03:48 PM

its looking mighty fine mike, yes, take your time and enjoy the journey…woodworking should never be a race….you certainly have some beautiful wood…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

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