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A Flag Display Box #3: Starting the Shoulder Cutting

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Blog entry by littlecope posted 02-06-2010 02:19 AM 870 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: The Jointing Begins Part 3 of A Flag Display Box series Part 4: Musings... »

I suppose if I had a hundred of these to make, and unlimited resources and equipment, I would probably make up some sort of beveled sled, and cut these with a Dado Blade or a Router Bit. But I only have to make one, and with the simplest of tools…
So after cutting and fitting the piecesEven fitted them first
I took one of the sides and clamped it to a kitchen chair!!Kitchen Chair Vise
Herein lies one of the reasons I left the fingers over-long. They make a great guide for the Hand Saw action that follows, cutting down the sides of the shouldersSawing sides of Shoulder cuts
After that is just a little coping saw work by littlecope to cut out the bottomsSawing Bottoms
It took less than five minutes! I then have to do some serious file work to get the bottoms just so…
I don’t have a “real” woodworkers bench of course, but I do have this old indestructible Bureau that someone tossed away.Did a quick clean-up of the bench tops It’s constructed in what I like to call the “Early Bad Taste” Style…circa early fifties, when designers were having some fun with the possibilities in that new wonder material, Plywood… When I got it, it looked even more hideous than it does now!! Someone, who must have taken some bad drugs or something, had painted it completely Black, except for the drawer fronts, which were painted Red, Green, and Blue… And they used Spray Paint, to boot!! So the Paint had flaked off all over the thing, not adhering to the veneer underneath. It took very little effort to scrape and sand off, revealing this wondrous sort of “Pickled” veneer… YUCK!!
But in the shop, it works out fine. As I said, it’s indestructible and holds a slew of tools and whatnot safe and out of sight. Last night I clamped the piece to be filed to it, and actually got to sit down on the job for a change, as I cleaned up the bottoms of this first jointClearing out bottoms with a file
I ran out of time last night, and was tired anyway, so I finished this off today. Here’s the desired effect:The Desired Effect
This Red Oak is as hard as can be, but I ultimately got where I wanted to be, after about a half hour…
Now that I know how to make one, I have to make three more joints just like it!! :)

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.



14 comments so far

View patron's profile

patron

13145 posts in 2063 days


#1 posted 02-06-2010 02:31 AM

mike , the thrill continues ,
it is coming along nicely .

you are doing a nice job !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View lew's profile (online now)

lew

10129 posts in 2478 days


#2 posted 02-06-2010 03:21 AM

Looking great, Mike!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112525 posts in 2299 days


#3 posted 02-06-2010 03:40 AM

Good progress

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2969 days


#4 posted 02-06-2010 04:22 AM

Hurry Mike I can’t wait to see the end. Just kidding. I really would like to see it finished though.

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View degoose's profile

degoose

7049 posts in 2077 days


#5 posted 02-06-2010 04:44 AM

Mike… take your time and enjoy the journey.. a little zen woodworking is good for the soul…

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View studie's profile

studie

618 posts in 1869 days


#6 posted 02-06-2010 06:39 AM

Mike, your shop looks like my first shop in an old farm shack. No disrespect meant, I made do with many a makeshift bench and was having the time of my life making cool stuff while refinishing antiques too. Now that I have a real work shop I can’t find the time to produce much, and it’s cold out there! You have a great amount of work ethic to make so many cool things and then share with all of us, thanks!

-- $tudie

View stefang's profile

stefang

13530 posts in 2057 days


#7 posted 02-06-2010 11:27 AM

Fun seeing the step by step details on this unusual project. Interesting work on the fingers! Looking forward to the next installment.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Eagle1's profile

Eagle1

2066 posts in 1787 days


#8 posted 02-06-2010 12:49 PM

My wife has a flag from her fathers funeral. I’ve been wanting to make her one. I think I will do it right now until I get the $ to get the stuff for the glider rocker.

-- Tim, Missouri ....Inside every older person is a younger person wondering what the heck happened

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7150 posts in 2026 days


#9 posted 02-06-2010 07:19 PM

great job mike…i love the hands on saw work…real wood working to me…cant wait to see whats next…hope your doing well…....grizzman

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2949 posts in 2224 days


#10 posted 02-07-2010 02:36 AM

I’m glad everybody’s enjoying the show!! As far as the hurrying up or taking my time debate, it’s slow going. I only wish I had Larry’s 36 hour Australian days… :)
But I managed to move forward a little more, not hardly enough for a blog though…Project Progress 2Project Progress 3
I have a ways to go yet, but it’s getting there… Thanks very much for your interest, my Friends!!

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View patron's profile

patron

13145 posts in 2063 days


#11 posted 02-07-2010 02:48 AM

” you are doing a fine job , young man ” !

thats what a boss i used to have ,
that was 20 years younger than me ,
used to say to me ,
then he would send me off to do some other fix-it thing .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Loucarb's profile

Loucarb

2388 posts in 2168 days


#12 posted 02-07-2010 03:13 AM

That is coming along pretty good. I with the rest I can’t wait to see the finished product. You’ve put some time & effort into it.

View Bob Kollman's profile

Bob Kollman

1797 posts in 1913 days


#13 posted 02-07-2010 08:35 AM

Good progress, I note the antique hand saw…you are a patient man, the sign of a true wood worker.

I kinda like the apperance of the dresser… It’s from the 50’s and still functioning, heirloom quality!!!!

-- Bob Kenosha Wi.

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2949 posts in 2224 days


#14 posted 02-07-2010 12:02 PM

Bob: Did you mean the Coping Saw or the regular Hand Saw? The Coping Saw was given to me by my Dad for Christmas, many, many years ago, maybe 1970…?
The Hand Saw I bought for myself in the 90’s. I did a review of it here: http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/625
Again, I couldn’t recommend it highly enough! :)

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

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