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Shaped Wooden Hinges #2: The Cutting

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Blog entry by littlecope posted 10-15-2009 02:39 PM 4317 reads 17 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: The Drilling Part 2 of Shaped Wooden Hinges series Part 3: "Bear Claw" Style Hinges »

Yesterday the first installment ended with all the holes having been drilled for the two pairs of hingesReady to begin cutting
It’s all Scroll Saw work from here! I took a few minutes first to police the area though. It had gotten a little out of hand, even for me!!Did a quick clean-up of the bench tops
The work begins with slicing off the waste area which exposes the side drilling.Start by cutting off waste section
Next is the beginning of the shaping. Side cuts first. These are a bear to cut!! Scroll Saws are not Chop Saws! They’ll do this sort of cutting, through about 1 1/2” of Oak, but it’s a slow affair…I feed it rather than push it, if that makes any sense, at times releasing all pressure so the blade can realign. Always pushing straight into the teeth, trying to avoid attempting to “curl” around the blade…
There was a fella on here a couple weeks ago who asked for advise about using the Scroll Saw to cut Chess pieces and I never got around to giving him any. But, aside from the good advice he did get, I had wanted to explain that it would be better to cut them in series like I’m doing here with these hinges. The reason I didn’t offer the advice was because I thought it would be easier to see it, rather than have it described…The work piece is larger, and gives more leverage. There’s a lot of force generated on that tiny blade, and trying to cut them individually would be almost impossible!
Anyway, side cuts first, working from the end, right on down…I put the blade in the access hole between the pair and cut out one way, but stop short of cutting all the way through as close as I dare, about 3/16” left. I drilled escape holes at the end of these cuts. Get there, escape, back to the ‘tween hole, and cut down the length of the other side of the hinge. “Escape” again, back to the ‘tween hole, and I back the blade into the cuts already made and cut the inside shape of the hinge “barrel”...End cutting continues...Scrolling the ends firstHoles on end of long cut are escape routes
Keep in mind, I haven’t cut “through” anywhere yet. When those cuts were done, I glanced at the bottom… the cuts reminded me of Frog Eyes…After the long cuts, the underside looks like frog eyes
After the side cuts are made, come the top cuts, and a return to normalcy as far as the cutting demands I’m asking of my poor old Scroll Saw… I again cut starting from the end, and working my way down, and cutting the parts almost, but not completely, out…The top cutting The top cutting continues
With all of the clearing cuts made…Bottom showing all clearing cuts finished
It’s a pretty simple matter to go back one last time, starting from the end, and make the parting cuts…
The whole procedure is like drawing, drilling, and carefully cutting, and then saving the piece that falls off, rather than the one you’ve been working on and trying to get right!! But here’s the result, with the scraps arranged like they were and the desired shapes beside them…Reassembled waste pieces... and the desired cut-outs
You’ll note there’s still a section uncut on the top half of the hinges. I removed that by simply using the corresponding cut-out, which gave me enough size and stability, when mated with the hinge top, to finger clamp and remove with the scroll saw… The 1/4” carriage bolt, and section thereof, help tremendously in the next step which is fitting them together…
This is accomplished by placing the “Strap” end of the bottom half of hinge into the viseClamped in vise with wooden faces and working it with a file until, well, until it works!! It takes a while… But I start rounding the bottom one, and rounding the top one, and trying to fit the bolt through. When I can fit the bolt through, I work at filing the whole rotation of the thing…
In use, it’s only going to turn 90 degrees (Man, I wish I knew how to make diacritical marks on these computers!) but it has to turn the full 180. If it didn’t, the rotating part inside the barrel would butt up against the box, and I’d be in a world of trouble…
As i said it takes a while, but don’t be afraid! File away!! These things are amazingly resilient! Keep an eye on the mating halves though, you don’t want to take off all the wood on one, without an equal amount being taken off of the other. There’s also this, if they don’t wholly mate, you may have to deepen the “throats” of the things…
But, ultimately, the mating was achieved and there came the moment of truth, when I tapped in the 1/4” dowel…The moment of truth
I like to use the wooden mallet for this, there’s just a better “feel” to it. I tried something I had thought of before this time too, I rubbed the end of the dowel on a bar of soap, in hopes that it would slide easier…Frankly, I didn’t notice any difference…It taps in either way just fine…
I did not glue this. There’s no need. Plus, if at some later point I wanted to change the wooden pin to brass rod, I can simply tap these out…
Trim the pin to length…Removing excess pivot pin
Some final half-round and flat filing and sanding action and Voila!!Small Oaken Hinges
Thanks for joining me on this adventure! This whole side “part” of a project is very time consuming and only you can decide whether it’s worth the effort or whether your time is too valuable to waste on such an endeavor… but the results are impressively strong, somewhat pleasing to the eye, and the cost is virtually nothing… :)

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.



12 comments so far

View lew's profile

lew

10006 posts in 2393 days


#1 posted 10-15-2009 02:49 PM

Great Tutorial, Thanks!

Are you finding it difficult to locate different TPI blades with “pin” ends?

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Woodwrecker's profile

Woodwrecker

3591 posts in 2213 days


#2 posted 10-15-2009 02:59 PM

Thanks a bunch!

-- Having fun...Eric

View patron's profile

patron

13022 posts in 1978 days


#3 posted 10-15-2009 03:05 PM

thanks mike !
very well explained ,
and shown .

you deserve a treat !

have one on me .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View stefang's profile

stefang

12978 posts in 1971 days


#4 posted 10-15-2009 03:10 PM

Brilliant! Thanks Mike for this tutorial. The result was very very nice hinges. I’m favoriting this and will probably try it out in the near future. Great work!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View nmkidd's profile

nmkidd

758 posts in 1810 days


#5 posted 10-15-2009 03:47 PM

Great tutorial, super results. This project is beyond my skill level nor do I have he proper equipment. May try something of this nature somewhere in the future…....but at present…...I have trouble lining up the mounting holes for prefab hinges.

-- Doug, New Mexico.......the only stupid question is one that is never asked!........don't fix it, if it ain't broke!

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2898 posts in 2139 days


#6 posted 10-15-2009 04:01 PM

Thanks for the comments, and treats!!
Lew: When I first started with the Scroll Saw I chased down, and bought, all two or three packages of five that each and every hardware store had in a five mile radius! I discovered that they never restocked either. It was frustrating in the extreme. I guess the Scroll Saw market is too small and insignificant for them to be bothered with…
But I learned of several good companies that cater to Scroll enthusiasts. The one I usually order from is WWW.meiselwoodhobby.com. I had a question one time, and Mr. Meisel the owner actually answered it!!
So anyway, I buy a bunch at a time, enough to last for years. The last time I purchased some was 8-9 years ago, 6-12 packs each of 18 TPI and 15 TPI, which is all that I use…Cost was $120 but at a buck apiece that’s savings over the stores that were trying to sell me blades, they were forever out of, for anywhere from $6 to $10 for a pack of five…
Doug: That’s why I started making my own in the first place…I can’t line ‘em up either!!

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View lew's profile

lew

10006 posts in 2393 days


#7 posted 10-15-2009 05:56 PM

Thanks for the information, Mike.

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View mtlwrkr's profile

mtlwrkr

6 posts in 1816 days


#8 posted 10-16-2009 03:42 AM

cope,
I wrote a program for Laser cutting some very similar parts for a scale ship model. The advantage with the laser is , no need for escape holes. I also band sawed hinges and pulls out of brass to replace broken castings on oriental chest.

I thought I understood where you were going, then you threw me a curve “diacritical”?

-- "But I'm Much Better Now"

View mtlwrkr's profile

mtlwrkr

6 posts in 1816 days


#9 posted 10-16-2009 03:46 AM

cope,
I wrote a program for Laser cutting some very similar parts for a scale ship model. The advantage with the laser is , no need for escape holes. I also band sawed hinges and pulls out of brass to replace broken castings on oriental chest.

I thought I understood where you were going, then you threw me a curve “diacritical”?

-- "But I'm Much Better Now"

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2898 posts in 2139 days


#10 posted 10-16-2009 04:09 AM

No, no, no!! I’m sorry!! I was just writing what I was thinking… I wrote 90 degrees and wished that I knew where the heck you find the little circles that indicate degrees are on these darn computers. I’ve had a computer for 2 years and still haven’t found where all the other doodads are kept that are not directly on the keys. Like vowel pronunciation marks, accent markers, etc. I think those are called diacritical marks. That’s all… Sorry for the mix-up…

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112030 posts in 2214 days


#11 posted 10-16-2009 06:59 AM

Very cool Mike

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2898 posts in 2139 days


#12 posted 10-17-2009 12:02 AM

90°!! Wow!! Skarp, you have no idea how much that means to me!! LOL Seriously though, it was just one of those pesky little things that bug a person, you know…I knew that they were in here, I’ve seen people use them, I just couldn’t figure out where they kept the darn things… Thanks a bunch!!

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

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