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Just for Fun... #4: Winding down to the finish...

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Blog entry by littlecope posted 09-09-2009 10:26 PM 922 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Hey, there's a box here! Part 4 of Just for Fun... series Part 5: Strong to the finish »

When we left this last, the box proper was all but done.A box is born
It’s time for the mundane, but important, little details. I’m sure the observant amongst you have noticed all the “bust outs” from when I used the table saw to mill slots for the top and bottom panels. You were probably LOL@ me! The next step addresses them.
I have a plethora of small, cut-out, leftover fingersPreparing to fill voids
and begin by splitting them into approximate size with my little mini-froe; an old knife style paint chipper.
Then it’s a simple matter of sanding them, in much the same way as we used to create points on popsicle sticks when we were kids, until they fit.Sanding chinking blocks to sizeClose-up of chinking block
Before you start ROTFL, consider this: this is exactly how it was done for centuries, before the invention of the router, or indeed electricity. The old-timers with their plow planes didn’t worry about “running out” the ends, because this was a planned step in the process anyway. This can be seen frequently in older house windows. Older window frames that rattle sometimes are caused by these tiny chinking blocks having fallen out, through the slamming of the window or simple shrinkage.
In any event, I apply the smallest dab of glue on these to increase my odds of them staying in place! After I’ve done a couple sidesTwo sides completed
I saw and file them flush, and go on to finish the last two sides…
Which leads to the last strictly building part of all this fun I’ve been having! I want to make some inserts to insure that the lid sits positively on the box, without sliding off. I don’t have anything thin and wide enough, other than ply, so I’m going to mill a lower riser and top it off. I still have a few scraps left of a nice thick slab of pine given to me by my Brother, and I’ll begin by drilling a mess of shallow holes along the cut line.Preparing the inserts
The reason for this becomes apparent after it’s sawnThe result after ripping
This will give a scalloped effect to the topmost one.
I install these by simply measuring to lengthMeasuring to cut inserts
and cuttingAfter cutting to length
This is not fine joinery!!! But I do want them to interlock and the technique is the same. I first mark the depths, using the pieces themselvesMarking depths of cuts
Then I scribble where I want to cutMarking for interlocking
And Voila! Interlocking Inserts!This is not fine joinery!!
This was the bottom riser set and I repeat the process with the “fancy” scalloped edged ones that I had prepared until, Presto!!The results
A little bit of clean up and final sanding and this is ready for the “finishing department”, which is located on the floor behind me… :)

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.



13 comments so far

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patron

13103 posts in 2031 days


#1 posted 09-10-2009 01:20 AM

jesus mike ,
you are crazier than i am !

i sure am having fun too ,
learning how to do this .

quite the possess,
and we couldn’t have done it without you !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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littlecope

2927 posts in 2192 days


#2 posted 09-10-2009 03:19 AM

So David, at what point did you figure that out? Was it the sharpened popsicle sticks or the one line cribbage board I was drilling? :)
The whole process is actually just a series of small steps, that only take minutes. Total work time for this, so far, is probably under ten hours, twelve if you want to count the picture taking…
But tonight, per my Dad’s suggestion, I spent the craziest and most fun-filled half hour of all!! Heehee…

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

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patron

13103 posts in 2031 days


#3 posted 09-10-2009 03:24 AM

you watched t.v.?

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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littlecope

2927 posts in 2192 days


#4 posted 09-10-2009 03:39 AM

T.V.? Nah, There hasn’t been anything funny on TV in 20 years.

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

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patron

13103 posts in 2031 days


#5 posted 09-10-2009 03:50 AM

you cleaned your shop ?

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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littlecope

2927 posts in 2192 days


#6 posted 09-10-2009 04:34 AM

You’re kidding, right?
No…since the “stripes” of the old stain are still so prominent, but don’t extend into the newly cut areas, my Dad had suggested painting them Black…Shiny Black, around the whole top. Found a small can of gloss black in their basement and already had an artist’s brush, so I went ahead and did it. Painting the stripes
The fun was that I don’t see that well anymore! And I’m not much of a painter! Glad I don’t have to do that everyday… :)

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

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patron

13103 posts in 2031 days


#7 posted 09-10-2009 04:44 AM

i was wondering about that in the first blog .
i thought maybe stain , but paint is better , not so “sucky into wood ” like stain .

tell your dad he’s still got it !

maybe you need some of those things called glasses ,
wal-mart has reading glasses in a 3 pack for about $(?) .
i got them everywhere .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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a1Jim

112335 posts in 2267 days


#8 posted 09-10-2009 04:47 AM

Looks cool well done.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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littlecope

2927 posts in 2192 days


#9 posted 09-10-2009 05:24 AM

Yeah, well, I’m all about those cheap glasses, have the strongest ones they sell. But for this kind of really close up work it’s still…challenging. I’ll have to look for an eyepiece next! Yet another useful thing I won’t be able to find in the shop! I’ll need glasses to SEE where I left the eyepiece!
Thank you, Jim! You and David are as sure as the sun to come around and brighten each day! :)

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

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patron

13103 posts in 2031 days


#10 posted 09-10-2009 05:46 AM

get one of those lamp/magnifier glass things you clamp on the table ,
like the jewelers use .
they sell them at wal-mart too !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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jockmike2

10635 posts in 2937 days


#11 posted 09-10-2009 02:25 PM

Looks cool Mike. Very cool..

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2927 posts in 2192 days


#12 posted 09-10-2009 03:15 PM

And Thank You, Michael!! I don’t have any special skills (unless semi-blindness counts!) but I try…

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

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patron

13103 posts in 2031 days


#13 posted 09-10-2009 03:19 PM

maybe ,
but you got ,
a feel ,
for the ,
real deal !

burma shave .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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