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Planer cutterhead bearing replacement #2: The bearing is removed; what next?

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Blog entry by lightweightladylefty posted 12-13-2015 01:45 AM 1239 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: HELP! Can anyone give me advice on replacing bearings on my planer cutterhead? Part 2 of Planer cutterhead bearing replacement series Part 3: UPDATE: IT’S ALL FIXED!! HOORAY! »

PTL! The bearing is finally off!

I eventually came to the realization that I should remove the motor to make the remaining parts easier to maneuver. I removed all the bearing beads with no difficulty since the raceway was broken and I had already removed it.

To try to keep the shaft centered so that there would be minimal torque on the opposite bearing, I wedged in a small piece of wood.

On the underside of the cast housing, there is an indention (that was, no doubt, the only way to get the cutterhead into the casting) where the bearing was more exposed.

I attempted to use a ¼” punch but it was only about 8 inches long and the angle was too difficult to hit squarely so I resorted to a very long (cheap—4-for-a-$1 variety) screwdriver (that I wasn’t worried about damaging). I made a little progress by going from side to side to strike it through the opening where the knives fit, but progress was minimal.

I thought about some solid metal curtain rods that were about ¼” diameter that I had used years ago and wondered if there were any still around. While looking through my hardware stash, I came across a ¼” steel rod about 2 feet long. Then the Lord brought to mind a cordless auto-hammer I had purchased a while ago (because the sale was too good to pass up) but had never used. I charged it up and, PTL! it worked really slick.

I just held the end of the rod on the bearing and the auto-hammer on the other end. I continued to go from side to side to move it off the shaft equally.

I had to leverage the inside ring of the bearing with the screwdriver before being able to get behind it with the rod and auto-hammer, but since the outside ring had been removed, it wasn’t difficult either.

Now I’m not certain if I should attempt to remove the other bearing which is still working fine. I don’t know if it would be easier or harder to remove because it is intact. I also don’t believe that replacing it later would be any more difficult than doing it now, except that I wouldn’t have to disassemble the whole planer again (disassembly was pretty simple).

Am I making a mistake not replacing the other bearing now? Would it be best to press both bearings on at the same time? Could the movement of the cutterhead shaft have damaged the intact bearing? What are you guys’ thoughts?

I certainly appreciate all the help you have given me.

L/W

-- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.



8 comments so far

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3392 posts in 1669 days


#1 posted 12-13-2015 04:10 AM

Good work on the dismantling of the crook bearing.

So the motor removal was the key to disassembly,
Personally I would change both whilst the machine is down, and will only require a single trip to get bearings.

The existing bearing may be OK, but you know already which one is going to fail the next time round.
Bearings as a rule do not like hammering, but it still may still be OK. PTL!

A simple static test:
Place your finger in the inner surface and turn it completly around a few times, if there is any sensation of binding, roughness or excessive play replace it, otherwise reassemble and continue on.

A semi dynamic test:
Assemble both bearings and without belts or drive gear manually spin the cutter head, watch and listen, if it spins away freely and with no noise its OK.
If there is any odd noise (chatter) or the cutter head appears to bind or comes to a abnormal stop change the bearing.
Check for end play by moving the cutter head axially.

Powering it up will now provide a dynamic test,
Again listen for any abnornal sounds and then power it down listening again paying particular attention to the spin down cycle.

An electric hammer…...who would have thought….PTL

-- Regards Robert

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7705 posts in 2308 days


#2 posted 12-13-2015 04:17 AM

I guess if it were me(and it’s not) I’d spend the money while the machine is disassembled and you have a method that works for you?

If one fails??

good work so far.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

3139 posts in 3178 days


#3 posted 12-13-2015 04:39 AM

Rob and Doc, Thanks for your responses. My husband is really pushing for replacing both, too. (He’s not the one killing himself doing the work though.) ;-) I’m thinking it might be the best answer, but I’m not altogether sure how difficult it will be to remove the other bearing. There’s a lot longer shaft from which to remove it, and no cut-out area like the other end has.

Rob, I’m not certain I quite understand what you’re saying about the simple static test. The good bearing is still on the cutterhead shaft so I wouldn’t be able to test it without removing, and removing it is where all the work is.

A concern that I forgot to address is that my husband thinks the two new bearings should be pressed on simultaneously to avoid the torque caused by the offset of the cutterhead shaft with one bearing off, and I’m not certain how difficult it would be to press both on evenly.

If I don’t press them on together, and if any damage was done to the remaining bearing from the torque caused by removing the other bearing, the same thing could occur if I replace just one bearing at first and then decide the second one needs replacing.

What a quandary!

L/W

-- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

5811 posts in 1757 days


#4 posted 12-13-2015 09:38 AM

Although I may be mechanically inclined, I’m no where near the mechanic my father was. I remember in situations like yours where one of two identical use bearings (or other parts) went bad and needed to be replaced, he always replaced both since they had both been exposed to identical histories and if one went bad, it was only a short time before they other could be expected to go bad. Good luck and best wishes.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17172 posts in 2571 days


#5 posted 12-13-2015 01:11 PM

Hi Lw. Glad to see it worked to knock the bearing out from the inside, The was the reverse of how it had to be installed. After all that work, you need to replace both bearing to start anew.

Good luck with it!!

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

3139 posts in 3178 days


#6 posted 12-15-2015 05:22 AM

I took everyone’s advice, removed the second bearing today, and ordered the replacements. I guess I just needed that extra coaxing to go ahead and “do it right” the first time around.

L/W

-- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7705 posts in 2308 days


#7 posted 12-15-2015 06:26 AM

Sometimes it’s good to take advice. I often wish I had…..LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3392 posts in 1669 days


#8 posted 12-18-2015 10:26 PM

Yeh way to go Lefty!!

-- Regards Robert

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