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The Shop #8: So cool, it's hot!

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Blog entry by Jon Spelbring posted 05-12-2008 08:51 PM 770 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Happy Feet Part 8 of The Shop series no next part

OK, this will probably be the last entry in this series for awhile. I’ll post some pics in my Workshop area once I have everything moved, and the shop set up.

So, what’s left? I have a ceiling, electricity, lights, walls, doors, and a floor.

Comfort. That’s right boys and girls. I don’t like to sweat it out in 90+ degrees with 90%+ humidity such as we have here in the St. Louis area in summer time. Nor do I like having to bundle up like the Michelin man, just to get some shop time in. Don’t get me wrong, I love the changing of the seasons – just not in my shop.

During the demolition and reconstruction, Mr. Heater worked fine. He smells a bit, but it was worth it to have some warmth. What to do come summer though? Window unit? As with many things in my shop, I really like versatility. A tool that can do more than one thing for me, and do it well.

To that end, and after a lot of research, I decided to install a PTAC (Portable Terminal Air Conditioner). Or, more accurately, A PTHC – Portable Terminal Heatpump and Air Conditioner (I know, the acronym doesn’t fit – live with it).

This past weekend, the project was to get the puppy installed.

I had left room (i.e. didn’t cover with OSB or insulation) for it on the back wall. Installation was frighteningly easy.

Step one, cut a hole in the wall

Fresh air

Step two, install the sleeve, set it to lean back 1/4 bubble, then screw it in to the studs

(forgot to take a picture)

Step three, install the grill to the outside (to protect the unit)

Keeps critters out

Step four, wrestle the main unit into place, and attach it to the sleeve.

100 pounds of cool

Step five, caulk the opening, and attach the faceplate.

Pretty!

For those who have a morbid curiosity about HVAC specs:

It’s an Amana PTAC unit with Heat pump with a 3kw electric backup for when it gets really cold. It’s rated at 12,000 btu cooling, and 11,900 for heat. It’s got an EER of 10.8. 220V/20A.

That’s it for now folks. Time to get everything moved.

Thanks to the wonders of electricity and technology, I even have tunes in the shop:

iPhone and Speaker

-- To do is to be



4 comments so far

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3282 days


#1 posted 05-12-2008 09:29 PM

Now your shop is really looking good. I am excited for you.

I am sure that you can’t wait to get this project completed!!

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 3448 days


#2 posted 05-12-2008 09:40 PM

AC is nice in the shop. This will be my first summer with it and I am looking forward to it.

Looking forward to seeing yours done.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View jjohn's profile

jjohn

390 posts in 3174 days


#3 posted 05-13-2008 01:55 PM

The unit looks small in the picture. Is it ? If so. How in the world does it work on 110 power and is able to cool down the whole shop ? And if you don’t mind me asking how about a link to its location.

-- JJohn

View Jon Spelbring's profile

Jon Spelbring

199 posts in 3714 days


#4 posted 05-13-2008 04:20 PM

Jjohn,

The unit measures 42” wide by 16” tall by 14” deep. It runs on a 220V/20A dedicated circuit. I don’t know of any PTACs that will run on 110 (though, I didn’t look very hard).

I bought mine online from http://www.ffemax.com – pretty good selection, reasonable prices, and free shipping.

-- To do is to be

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