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First Table #1: My first table

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Blog entry by Boon posted 2369 days ago 763 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Tablepic1

This is table i’m working on, I know its a little “grand” for a first timers table, but I figured if I can do this table, it will make doing future tables much easier. I’m a child of the 80s and i grew up around 70s and early 80s furniture and if you remember, it was all massive and looked like wood. I love huge furniture still and can never just let a good floor model tv go to waste (i made a router table out of one and a fish tank out of another). So without regard i started on this “table” and it turned out huge and i had no idea why until i looked around my house. Everything i own is from the 70s or early 80s and big as all get out. In hindsight, that must have been why it was SOOOOO much fun moving into this house a year ago.

It is made out of a cabinet grade pine top from lowes, pine 2×2s and plywood. It is 23.5×48 and 27 inches tall. I know, pretty big considering my original idea was for a coffee table, ahaha.

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I need to add stretchers for more stability since it wobbles a little. (i’m actually considering making it a cabinet instead of just adding support)

My dad used a rotozip with a jigsaw mount to cut out the diamond in the center, then i thought it needed it to be a little bigger and made a bad cut and thus the idea of a frame around it was born. I bought some small molding from lowes and we cut the miters, glued it together and i tried regular titebond2 on it, but the pressure was too much i guess and i had to use epoxy to get it to stay in place. maybe its a humidity thing. (i do live in west TN, very similar weather to Mississippi).

The finish is 2 coats of cherry oak i got at lowes discounted, 11 bucks for a gallon of something smooth like cherry oak? i’m buyin every time. anyway I dont know anything about staining and this is the first real attempt at staining well, i can see some flaws i made but oh well, life goes on. I sprayed 2 coats of poly from a can, some parts are smoother than others, i think i’ll get into the brush on poly before i give this piece away.

I got the idea from a generic coffee table pic on the web, and thought it would look better if it were bigger and had a porcelain tile in the middle of it.

including the rotozip bits i had to buy the table has only been about 50 dollars worth of materials.

-- www.jonboon.info - more crap coming soon!



6 comments so far

View Russel's profile

Russel

2199 posts in 2537 days


#1 posted 2369 days ago

Tables are a good place to start, there are more techniques involved than one would think. As a first it’s a good start and put on the path to even more neat stuff.

-- Working at Woodworking http://www.VillageLaneFurniture.com

View Tomcat1066's profile

Tomcat1066

942 posts in 2394 days


#2 posted 2369 days ago

I like it! Being a child of that same era, something about this table just seems cool to me ;)

-- "Give me your poor tools, your tired steel, your huddled masses of rust." Yep, I ripped off the Statue of Liberty. That's how I roll!

View rikkor's profile

rikkor

11295 posts in 2473 days


#3 posted 2369 days ago

Good first project. Looks like it’s useful, too.

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2420 days


#4 posted 2369 days ago

Nice looking table. I like the addition of the center piece. I don’t blame you for posting this. It is a wonderful first project.

Now, flush with your success, I assume that other projects are in the works.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2688 days


#5 posted 2369 days ago

Looks good.

If it feels tacky try sanding lightly (Like barely) with some worn 320 or 400 grit sand paper. You can prepare the paper by folding it in half and rubbing it on itself to knock off anything that feels sharp. Rub that lightly on any parts where you feel nibs. The goal is to sand the finish and knock down any dust nibs that accumulated as it was drying. Don’t be tempted to sand any bubbles. And go light. (almost zero pressure).

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19313 posts in 2449 days


#6 posted 2368 days ago

Nice table Boon.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

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