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veritas jig mk2

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Blog entry by joez posted 03-16-2011 05:46 AM 1166 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have a plane blade that seems not be geometrically correct. I register the plane blade at the veritas mk 2 jig than place it on the granite block I see and feel a very big dip on one side bevel. Does this sound familiar to anyone.

How can I fix my plane more accurately and faster?



12 comments so far

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1511 posts in 3030 days


#1 posted 03-16-2011 12:59 PM

Check the blade bevel with a square, it sound like it is off a bit. If it is off you will need to reset the bevel.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#2 posted 03-16-2011 02:40 PM

It sounds like whoever established the primary bevel might have had the blade improperly set in a grindstone jig. I’ve done this before, sadly. Once it’s square in your jig, you can re-establish the new primary bevel but it will take quite a while on sandpaper/scary sharp. I like to establish a hollow ground primary on a wheel, then move to the sandpaper to re-establish a flat primary. Like you, I like the sandpaper system & it shaves off some time.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View joez's profile

joez

120 posts in 2368 days


#3 posted 03-16-2011 09:13 PM

I squared the blade, still there is a dip, I even flip the blade over on the blunt name brand side which is square?

Do I buy A new plane blade?

Do I buy a new honing jig?

View joez's profile

joez

120 posts in 2368 days


#4 posted 03-16-2011 09:14 PM

View joez's profile

joez

120 posts in 2368 days


#5 posted 03-16-2011 09:16 PM

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#6 posted 03-16-2011 09:25 PM

I’d love to help but I’m having a hard time understanding what’s going on. I’m not understanding the use of “dip” and “thicker”. Is the blade cupped (concave or convex)? If so, you need to replace the blade. If not, and you’re able to register the sides of the blade flatly within your grinding jig, you just need to work away at it to establish a new bevel.

Be careful if you’re using anything other than sandpaper because you might damage your stone. You may just need to put in some elbow grease on some low grit sandpaper. You’re taking off a good bit of metal, so it will take a while, and the blade will get warm. Be careful! Do you have access to a grinding wheel?

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View joez's profile

joez

120 posts in 2368 days


#7 posted 03-17-2011 12:59 AM

This is what i mean

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1511 posts in 3030 days


#8 posted 03-17-2011 01:16 AM

So if I’m understanding correctly, the bevel end of the blade is square. If you lay the blade on a flat surface does it rock or not? Does the blade have a twist?

Also, this may be a long-shot but keep in mind, Veritas makes a camber roller too. Do you possibly have this?

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View Gofor's profile

Gofor

470 posts in 3252 days


#9 posted 03-17-2011 05:17 AM

I have some older blades (a couple stanleys and a miller falls) that the sides are not parallel. They are tapered to the back. If you register one side, the end will be as you describe. I do not know if they were made this way or if someone in the past tried to clean up the sides and ground them off square.

I scribe a line down the blade along the slot and then use a small square block to align it to the jig. I still use the guide stop to set the angle.

I also have an old tapered iron (hard steel forged onto softer steel) that came from an old wood plane. This jig does not want to hold it firmly (it will skew), so I use the Mark 1 which holds it better.

My advice would be to find the center line and use a small square block to align it or buy a new blade.

The problem with old irons is that you have no idea what someone has done to them in the past. You can align one side (the left side on the Mark II) and the iron will cut fine, but the lateral adjustment lever will be skewed to the left for you to get a square cut.

JMTCW

Go

-- Go http://ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=730

View joez's profile

joez

120 posts in 2368 days


#10 posted 03-22-2011 07:38 PM

No I dont have a chamber roller

View joez's profile

joez

120 posts in 2368 days


#11 posted 03-22-2011 07:38 PM

camber

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1511 posts in 3030 days


#12 posted 03-22-2011 11:41 PM

Did you flatten the back of the blade? Lay the blade on a flat surface bevel side up, press one corner at a time to check for flatness. If it rocks then your blade is not flat, if it is you may need a new blade. It would help a lot to see a picture of the blade on the flat surface, you know a picture is worth a thousand words :)

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

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