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Trio of veneered boxes #2: More veneer work in the Kitchen

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Blog entry by jmartel posted 11-11-2014 06:45 AM 1711 reads 1 time favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Intro, wood selection, and starting the cutting Part 2 of Trio of veneered boxes series Part 3: Personalization »

Well, the bike is still down. Managed to fix my starting issue, but now it doesn’t hold idle. It’s always something. With modern diagnostics, I can check/change fueling and many other parameters with a laptop. The laptop was out to upload a new map, but unfortunately it isn’t going to help my idle issue. That’s more of a mechanical problem I believe.

Unfortunately for these projects, that means that I still can’t do any work in the garage. That means I need to do some more veneer work upstairs.

I started tonight out by figuring out how I wanted the veneer on the 2 walnut boxes laid out. I decided that I wanted bookmatched panels for the front, the top, and the rear panels on each box. Additionally, I wanted the left side to be a mirror of the right side on each box as well. So, I sat down and planned out my cuts, giving myself about 1/2” in each direction extra for off-cuts/tearout. The walnut veneer is pretty brittle, so it likes to chip out when cutting with the knife.

Once I had all the pieces cut out, I taped the bookmatched panels together, and laid them out to see how it would all look.

For these 2 boxes, the only veneer work I have left to do upstairs is to inlay initials into the fiddleback sycamore that will go on the underside of the lid.

I decided to move onto the third box’s top at this point. I cut out the top panel out of mahogany that somewhat matched the 4/4 Sapele I have on hand, and began to work on the compass rose. I only got the 4 main points done tonight. The smaller 4 points will have to wait for another night.

The white is some remaining white dyed veneer that has some sort of birds eye figure in it. The black is Wenge, which was extremely brittle. This stuff splits constantly. I think for every good point in Wenge I had, I had about 3 or 4 more that were broken in some way. At this point, I’m not sure whether or not I should add the same circular border of Bloodwood and the white veneer that I did for my father’s end tray. I may do something different for edge banding instead.

Tomorrow night will likely be more of the same. Hopefully I can start cutting the substrate this weekend.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.



8 comments so far

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2802 days


#1 posted 11-11-2014 09:24 AM

Your book matches look good. Does it help to moisten those brittle pieces before cutting? Not saying, just wondering.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mike1950's profile

mike1950

360 posts in 1266 days


#2 posted 11-11-2014 12:59 PM

Looking good- got to love that walnut!!!

-- "There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as if everything is."– Albert Einstein

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1592 posts in 892 days


#3 posted 11-11-2014 01:27 PM

If you need help with diagnosing vacuum leaks or fuel trim problems, I can maybe give you some things to check.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2265 days


#4 posted 11-11-2014 02:27 PM

Nice looking matches Jeff and the compass rose is coming along well too.

Now that you have HHG available you may want to paper reinforce the good sides of your veneer before cutting. It really helps keep the sharp points intact and prevents a lot of the chip out problems you are having. Newsprint works best. Just apply thin coat of HHG to the veneer, lay the paper on it and brush it down with a nail brush. Then clamp it flat in a press or between a couple of pieces of pw until it dries. Remember to use the paper side as the good side leaving the glue side clean. The paper comes off easily with cold water and a razor blade after mounting on the substrate.

Also for knife work especially, dyed black is widely available ( I get it from Constantines) that is much easier to use than Wenge.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6578 posts in 1618 days


#5 posted 11-11-2014 03:55 PM



Your book matches look good. Does it help to moisten those brittle pieces before cutting? Not saying, just wondering.

- stefang

To be honest, I’m not sure. I didn’t want to wet it in case it warped. I will be flattening the whole panel using some cauls and thinned down HHG before I laminate them. Going to be trying veneer hammering with these.


Looking good- got to love that walnut!!!

- mike1950

Figured walnut is my all-time favorite wood. I can’t get enough of it.


If you need help with diagnosing vacuum leaks or fuel trim problems, I can maybe give you some things to check.

- timbertailor

I should be ok. I’m going to pull the valve cover and double check my valves and timing, then re-adjust the idle stepper motor and see.


Nice looking matches Jeff and the compass rose is coming along well too.

Now that you have HHG available you may want to paper reinforce the good sides of your veneer before cutting. It really helps keep the sharp points intact and prevents a lot of the chip out problems you are having. Newsprint works best. Just apply thin coat of HHG to the veneer, lay the paper on it and brush it down with a nail brush. Then clamp it flat in a press or between a couple of pieces of pw until it dries. Remember to use the paper side as the good side leaving the glue side clean. The paper comes off easily with cold water and a razor blade after mounting on the substrate.

Also for knife work especially, dyed black is widely available ( I get it from Constantines) that is much easier to use than Wenge.

- shipwright

Good information to know, thank you.

I had thought about using the dyed black veneer (I used it in my last box for the orca and windows on the lighthouse), but since my mom wanted it to match my Dad’s, I decided to use the same Wenge that his compass rose had.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2265 days


#6 posted 11-11-2014 04:04 PM

I wouldn’t recommend hammer veneering a match like this. You would have a lot of trouble getting it to stay aligned. Joining veneers seamlessly is easy with hammer veneering by overlap/ cut both/ remove scrap method but the match would not likely be great. If already matched, there’s no way to keep the pieces together as you need to apply force with the hammer and that will dislodge any tape you are using. There may also be issues with stick-down at the seam.
Get familiar with hammer veneering on some scrap. You will understand what I’m talking about. :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6578 posts in 1618 days


#7 posted 11-11-2014 04:11 PM

No worries, then. I’ll just use cauls like I had been using previously. Not a big deal, especially with these smaller pieces. The largest pieces are only going to be 8×10”.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View ToddJB's profile

ToddJB

6924 posts in 1598 days


#8 posted 11-11-2014 07:43 PM

That burl is amazing. These will be very attractive.

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built

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