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Lathe Stand #3: Transformation

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Blog entry by Jeremy Greiner posted 08-20-2011 07:02 AM 2482 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Dry fitting the frame Part 3 of Lathe Stand series Part 4: To Spray Paint or To HVLP that is the question »

Next step on my lathe stand was to start making the plywood panels to fill out the frame. I created the top and bottom and wanted to get a good feel for how the lathe sits on the stand.

After doing this I was pretty mad at myself. I had completely forgotten to take into account wheel height when I planned out the stand. So when I attach the wheels, the thing will be 5’’ too high. Which puts it at a really awkward position.

I took a break for a day or two just to ponder on what I could do to fix the problem. I thought about cutting the legs in half, trimming them and connecting them back together but I was concerned that it would compromise stability.

In the end I decided instead of fixing the lathe stand, I would turn the lathe stand into something else, a shop storage cart. I’ve been wanting to build one for a while now I need the storage space to help organize things a little better so might as well take advantage of the half built cart and see what I can do.

With a new plan layed out I moved forward, attaching the side panels.

I decided to put in a divider wall, one side will have drawers the other will be an open cabinet. If I had planned this better I could have added dado’s to the top and bottom panels and wouldn’t need the cleats. I’ve seen this done on TV, I haven’t tried it myself I was very pleased with how strong of a hold the cleats had.

And here’s a final picture with the divider wall installed.

Once I get the back installed I’ll do a bunch of sanding and get it ready for painting. I’m very happy with how it’s turning out and I look forward to making the drawers and such. Just means it’ll be a few more weeks before I get to fire up the lathe and try my hand at turning.

-jeremy

-- Easy to use end grain cutting board designer: http://www.1024studios.com/cuttingboard.html



4 comments so far

View John Gray's profile

John Gray

2370 posts in 2640 days


#1 posted 08-20-2011 06:10 PM

Lookin’ good! Thanks for the postings!!!

-- Only the Shadow knows....................

View Eric in central Florida's profile

Eric in central Florida

3677 posts in 2330 days


#2 posted 08-20-2011 06:34 PM

Great save and smart idea Jeremy!
You certainly turned a negative in to a positive.
Now, you will not only have a nice lathe stand, you will have a cool work station/storage cart as well.
Nice going !

-- All glory comes from daring to begin.

View SunCityBob's profile

SunCityBob

1 post in 1196 days


#3 posted 09-20-2011 02:02 AM

HOw big is your lathe and how did you make the beutiful stand heavy enough for the lathe?

Thank you.

SunCityBob

View Jeremy Greiner's profile

Jeremy Greiner

568 posts in 1527 days


#4 posted 09-20-2011 05:04 AM

This is the lathe I have. According to the website it has an 8’’ by 30’’ footprint.
www.harborfreight.com/5-speed-bench-top-wood-lathe-65345.html

using the frame with the plywood created a very solid frame, I was ready to fill the bottom with sand or something to weigh it down but I didn’t need it. The natural weight and sturdyness was enough.

For a larger lathe weight may be needed. There is some free space under the floor of the cabinet that can be filled with something to weigh it down.

-- Easy to use end grain cutting board designer: http://www.1024studios.com/cuttingboard.html

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