LumberJocks

Stuff of interest at the Met #3: Rietveld's ZigZag Stoel (Chair)

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by naomi weiss posted 02-08-2010 07:35 PM 3490 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: French Art Deco: Emile Jacques Ruhlmann Part 3 of Stuff of interest at the Met series no next part

I was actually looking for Rietveld’s Red and Blue chair, but i found the 1934 Zigzag chair. I must confess that since my enthusiasm for anything past the year 1700 is fairly recent, when i was in my uncle’s house in Friesland 2 years ago and he showed me this chair, i had NO idea what it was (just to come totally clean: i also spent several days in Utrecht without visiting the Schroder house—cringe).

This chair is out of control. As one Metroactive writer puts it, the chair ‘not only looks like a set piece from Sprockets, it will make you feel like Dieter when sitting on it. For those who don’t mind sitting on a 90-degree-angled wooden chair with no gluteal padding and have $925 to burn (not including shipping and handling), the zig-zag could be the ticket. For people with bony behinds, however, the chair makes for a stunning bedside or end table.’ Hmmm. A diverse piece.

Anyway, here is a MUCH cooler vid of a guy building it. I like how he uses all hand tools (at least in the video) and how he uses a hybrid of eastern (saw) and western (plane) tools.

-- 'Humility is a duty in great ones, as well as in idiots'--Jeremy Taylor



7 comments so far

View jlsmith5963's profile

jlsmith5963

297 posts in 2037 days


#1 posted 02-08-2010 09:10 PM

Naomi

Over the years I have traveled to the Netherlands a couple of times and one of those trips I was able to visit the Rietveld's Schroder house. In undergrad I was quite taken by the De Stijl movement so it was a treat to see and tour the inside (even though the tour was given in dutch, lol). One thing I never really noticed in the photos of the house is that it is actually stuck onto the end of a row of traditional brick housing (if you look at the background in the photos you can see the party wall). The context makes the building even more unusual. The house also has copies of the famous chairs. I always preferred this original photo

If my memory serves initially the chair was painted in black, white and gray. The Mondrian colors came after Rietveld joined up with the De Stijl group. Also when your able to see his work you realize the scale of it all furniture and architecture) is quite small. I don’t believe the Rietveld chair ever went into any kind of production when it was first design, so every one you now see is really a re-production (I think).

-- criticism: the art of analyzing and evaluating the quality of an artistic work...

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8791 posts in 2788 days


#2 posted 02-08-2010 10:07 PM

I find Rietveld’s Red and Blue chair interesting from a historical aspect and the impact or influence that it had on design.

But at times I wonder to myself how could anyone, at any given point in history, think “Oh this looks great?”

This is what comes to mind when I see the Red and Blue chair.

Thanks for sharing the tour. You make me jealous.

While I was working in Ohio, I would visit the Ohio State University campus and the school of architecture there. The library had several historically significant chair designs on display. It wasn’t a sterile museum setting, the setting was more casual and you could sit in them and examine them.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112322 posts in 2265 days


#3 posted 02-08-2010 11:33 PM

Cool videos thanks

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View jlsmith5963's profile

jlsmith5963

297 posts in 2037 days


#4 posted 02-09-2010 01:10 AM

Todd

Come on now, how could anyone, at any given point in history, think “Oh this looks great?”, is awfully harsh (not to mention a little lacking in imagination) lol. Now clearly the Rietveld chair is ‘comfort challenged’ but the picture of Rietveld sitting in his chair in front of his shop with his crew surrounding him kind of has the look of ‘isn’t this great’ to me.

So when were you taking these trips to OSU and exactly where were these chairs? I am an alum (undergrad) of the school of architecture and I don’t know anything about these chairs. Of course, I was there when the 3rd yr design studio was in the converted horse stables adjacent to Brown Hall… lol.

Go Bucks

-- criticism: the art of analyzing and evaluating the quality of an artistic work...

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8791 posts in 2788 days


#5 posted 02-09-2010 03:11 AM

jlsmith – Do you still live in Ohio? I will have to be sure and have an LJ gathering when I make it back to the Buckeye state.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View coko's profile

coko

5 posts in 2168 days


#6 posted 02-16-2010 01:41 AM

A couple of years ago someone in Holland bougth a chair at a flea market for 6 dollars or so.
She brougth it to a tv show where they look at antiques, it turned out to be a genuine “stok stoel”by Rietveld.
One of only 5 built,designed in 1924 and built 3 years later. It was worth somewhere around 30.000 dollars with it’s cut-off legs and the white details painted black, after restoration it was estimated at 70.000 dollar!

View mtkate's profile

mtkate

2049 posts in 2014 days


#7 posted 02-16-2010 02:06 AM

Naomi, ironically my interest in things past 1700 is also recent (last few years). Thanks for sharing.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase