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rebuilding an old knife #5: Finally, progress

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Blog entry by jeffswildwood posted 08-14-2017 09:11 PM 577 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Finally back to the scales Part 5 of rebuilding an old knife series Part 6: The finish line, last entry! »

My last entry I got the scale parts cut and ready for glue up. I made some progress on that and all went well. I came up with two nice scales. Next came trimming the excess and smoothing. Not too bad of a task. Just took a little time. I then had this. In addition, I decided to remove the metal on the end of the handle. Just a little dremel work.

My next step I decided to trim some excess from the front and back and get everything to size. After that I decided to concentrate on the front of the scales. I was unable to go with a bolster so I went with a round over. Lots of filing and sanding to get it where I wanted it. When I was happy with my round over it was time for the holes. I used brass punches to hold everything in alignment while I drilled. Worked great. At this point it’s time to cut some pin stock and break out the epoxy.

I also traced the outline of the knife on the upper scale so when I begin cutting, I can keep the handle metal out of my band saw blade.

Note: I am making some mistakes on this, hoping it all evens out at the end. It’s good practice so I can really make a better knife for the swap. Thanks all for reading and following.

Update, I just finished the glue up so in the next blog I will start forming the handle.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".



15 comments so far

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

2500 posts in 1140 days


#1 posted 08-15-2017 12:00 AM

Looking good Jeff!

I thought I would share something I just learned last week from my son. He was epoxying some wood to both sides of a flat stainless metal tool, not a knife. He had me drill 2 holes in the metal, but he was not going to pin the sides together. What he did:

1- Put 2 part epoxy on the first wood part only and aligned it approximately where it was supposed to go.

2- Turned it over and put a glop of epoxy in both holes.

3- Applied epoxy to the other wood part only and put that in place.

4- Aligned everything, then put thin flat scrap (cauls) on both outer surfaces and carefully clamped them, adjusting alignment while tightening the clamps.

I asked why he didn’t use pins. He said the epoxy in the holes would act the same as a pin. Building guitars, he had used this method many times. He said he could have pinned them, but said that was just an extra step that wasn’t really necessary. BTW, he was careful about applying the epoxy to avoid excess squeeze out that would have to be trimmed later.

I’m just sharing his method, not suggesting anything.

Keep it up buddy!

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1073 posts in 398 days


#2 posted 08-15-2017 12:15 AM

That’s coming together nicely, Jeff.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

2494 posts in 1793 days


#3 posted 08-15-2017 12:26 AM

Thanks guys. Duck I like your Son’s method, and his work speaks for itself! I already drilled or I would give it a try. It would be a nice clean look. I also like the looks of the brass pins but I foresee some careful dremel work.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3184 days


#4 posted 08-15-2017 12:41 AM

Nice work Jeff. You could add a piece of wood between the scales and shape the handle so the filler piece works as a guard.

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

2494 posts in 1793 days


#5 posted 08-15-2017 12:48 AM

Dan that IS a good tip. I have already glued the handle on so it may be too late. I’ll have to look at it tomorrow, there may be a possibility.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

2500 posts in 1140 days


#6 posted 08-15-2017 12:49 AM

That’s a good Idea Dan. Yes, I kinda like the brass pins also, but they may be an unnessary step. Dunno, never done anything like that before.

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3184 days


#7 posted 08-15-2017 12:54 AM

Come on Duck, you can fit one more little project into your schedule! ;-)

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

2500 posts in 1140 days


#8 posted 08-15-2017 01:57 AM

Not according to my wife. That was a flat NO from her, and I listened :(
She has other projects for me, mostly building fence.

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4464 posts in 954 days


#9 posted 08-15-2017 11:49 AM

Good stuff buddy! That’s looking better all the time. I like Dan’s idea for shaping a guard into the handle if you have enough material. If not, I don’t think it’s necessary.

Duck’s son is right that epoxy will hold those scales by itself. Probably better than pins. Personally, I like to use both – epoxy to hold them and pins for looks.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3295 posts in 2592 days


#10 posted 08-15-2017 12:10 PM

Looks really nice. I did a a number of scales for the kitchen knives. Bought a bench top belt sander – a spindle sander would have been better – to help do the shaping and rough sanding after glue up.

The belt sander does the job but you better wear cut proof gloves because the sander can catch the knife and kick it out of your hands – can get painful. A spindle sander won’t do that.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

2494 posts in 1793 days


#11 posted 08-15-2017 12:58 PM

Ken, I think I have just enough to make that bolster. Gotta try it. If it don’t work I can always cut it off. Thanks David, I wish I had a spindle sander. I been in the market for one.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

6751 posts in 1859 days


#12 posted 08-15-2017 01:25 PM

Coming along fine Jeff. These practice runs are going to make you a knife guru soon. You may have to team up with Mafe soon. I like pins just for the aesthetics alone.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

2494 posts in 1793 days


#13 posted 08-15-2017 01:58 PM

Thanks Dave, as for Mafe, he is the master!

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2888 posts in 528 days


#14 posted 08-15-2017 02:00 PM

you should join the knife swap ….LMAO :<)) GREAT JOB

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

2494 posts in 1793 days


#15 posted 08-15-2017 02:29 PM

LOL, I might just do that!

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

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