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rebuilding an old knife #2: Rust removal

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Blog entry by jeffswildwood posted 06-16-2017 11:56 AM 720 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Knife restoration Part 2 of rebuilding an old knife series Part 3: Starting the scales »

I had a little time to do some work on my old knife If you been following along this is where I left off on the last entry.

I started doing some rust removal. I got a lot of good tips from my friends for getting the rust off of this old blade. The method I chose was by using Locktite naval jelly. Basically I chose this due to availability. A trip to the store and that was what I found and seemed the easiest on cost. Everyone seemed to recommend using a wire wheel for clean up. I didn’t have one or a grinder motor to put one on so I did the next best thing, bought one for my drill. Ifollowed the directions on the bottle and used the brush to remove any loose rust.

I coated the blade in the jelly and waited the require 15 minuets. Rinsed, and was really happy with the results. When I brought it in I again broke out the wire wheel and went over it again. I also did a little work with the sandpaper, going up the grits just to see. Here is what I have now. The blade also got it’s second dose of DNA when the wire brush got away from me and “cleaned” my thumb knuckle.

So far I am happy with the results. There is pitting from the rust that I may leave alone to show it’s age. It’s along the upper portion of the blade. On the lower portion I can see where someone in the past may have taken a grinder or dremel to it. This I am going to try to smooth out. I still have some more blade work to do but it is comeing along better then I thought. Next I am going to remove the “lips” on the back and smooth a bit more. I also plan on starting a good polishing process. Again, any help or advice is appreciated and thanks for viewing.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".



15 comments so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4302 posts in 918 days


#1 posted 06-16-2017 12:40 PM

Nice work buddy, looks great! I wouldn’t worry with smoothing up the handle section any more. That pitting and texture will help epoxy get a better “grip” when you put your scales on. As far as polishing up the blade, I’d work up in grit with wet/dry paper however far you feel it needs to be polished using WD-40 as lubricant. Then, since you don’t have a grinder, use some green polishing compound on one of the cotton buffing wheels for your dremel to give it the final shine. You may find that just the sandpaper is sufficient for a knife though.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

2226 posts in 1757 days


#2 posted 06-16-2017 12:51 PM

Ken, that was my thoughts exactly. I think the handle is just fine. The pitting on the upper section I also may leave alone. Along the blade edge there is streaks from a prior grinding. Looks like from a dremel. These I want to try to get out. I am still curios about what (small) cut offs you may have Anything with some crazy grain pattern? Dan, (papadan) has been helping me with putting on a bolster, lots of good advice.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4302 posts in 918 days


#3 posted 06-16-2017 12:56 PM

What size do you need? I’ll get you some pictures tonight or tomorrow and post them here. I know I have some curly maple but it’s nothing special IMHO. I have a little birds eye maple that may be big enough. I have some purpleheart, and katalox I know. Pretty sure I have some bolivian rosewood and some bubinga scraps that will be big enough and I might have some paduak the right size. You’re welcome to whatever I have that’s big enough!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

2226 posts in 1757 days


#4 posted 06-16-2017 08:50 PM

Ken, hope this helps.

Being new at this I didn’t know what to say for measurements.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

6599 posts in 1823 days


#5 posted 06-16-2017 10:49 PM

Looks like you’re getting the blade in shape. Waiting to see what you pick out for the handle. Keep up the pace Jeff.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4302 posts in 918 days


#6 posted 06-16-2017 11:40 PM

Yep that helps Jeff. I’ll take some pics of what I’ve got tonight or in the morning.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

2226 posts in 1757 days


#7 posted 06-17-2017 12:16 AM

Thanks Dave. I still have some work to do on it but it is going faster then I thought! Several options to consider now. A brass bolster, grinding off the back of the tang and a little more cosmetic work. I can tell you I am having a blast working on it. Ken, thanks! I had to look up a couple of the woods you mentioned. New to me. They look beautiful. A thousand different ideas are running through my head right now. I hope I don’t get crazy and detail it to death!

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4302 posts in 918 days


#8 posted 06-17-2017 01:10 AM

First, I have Katalox. Absolutely beautiful wood IMO. Also known as poor man’s ebony.

Then from left to right, paduak, jatoba, purpleheart and brazilian rosewood.

Let me know what you like!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4302 posts in 918 days


#9 posted 06-17-2017 01:15 AM

Oops forgot, a small piece of BEM. Should be plenty for knife scales though.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3148 days


#10 posted 06-17-2017 01:35 AM

Katalox or Birdseye depending on if you want light or dark. MHO You’re going to have to learn a little leather working now, so you will have a sheath for that knife!

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2743 posts in 492 days


#11 posted 06-17-2017 03:23 AM

shellac base and a glazing stain that birds eye would look beautiful :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

2226 posts in 1757 days


#12 posted 06-17-2017 12:05 PM

Wow, what beautiful choices I have to make. I’ll be out of town today Ken, going to Blacksburg, so I will have to think about it when I get home. Tony, as it turns out I have a set of leathercraft tools. I have not used them in years so now is the time to break them out I think.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4302 posts in 918 days


#13 posted 06-17-2017 12:28 PM

No problem Jeff. Just let me know. And feel free to pick more than 1 if you can’t decide. Let me know what rough thickness you need too and I’ll resaw them before I send them if you need me to.

Going to the Solstice Fest in Blacksburg?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

2226 posts in 1757 days


#14 posted 06-17-2017 12:46 PM

Thanks Ken, your offer is awesome! No, the trip is for Dad’s day dinner. One of my Son’s lives there. Dinner and maybe a trip to the depot. ;)

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View torus's profile

torus

33 posts in 192 days


#15 posted 06-17-2017 12:58 PM

I would go with Brazilian rosewood. Looks like (to me) it will go better with blade form.
I am also against removing the lip on the bottom of the handle. I have seen knives with such feature. It is my guess that this lip is for protecting handle material and may be for better connection between metal and handle.
IMO it looks cool too…

-- "It's getting better..." - put this on my RIP stone!

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