LumberJocks

Ruminations, Philosophy, and Workshop Antics.......... #12: The Panel Trolley Antic................gonna lighten my load.........

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Jim Bertelson posted 02-01-2010 12:57 AM 1644 reads 4 times favorited 27 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 11: Case for a digital oven thermometer Part 12 of Ruminations, Philosophy, and Workshop Antics.......... series Part 13: Lumberjocks Mentored Projects »

I saw this panel handler trolley in a magazine, except made out of metal, and therefore a much different looking base where the panel rests. I thought the physics were doable in wood, and I had a bunch of scrap wood.

I needed a little warmup before tackling my super sled. The main pieces of the sled are cut out by the way, and the fences are gluing up. I decided I had enough shop time this weekend, now I need to vegetate before starting another week of work.

This project is classified as an antic, because an antic is making something to prove you could do it when it would be smarter to buy it. My only excuse was I hadn’t seen one in the local stores. And I had all this warped plywood to use on small items.

So first a picture of the trolley in action on a panel. This is before I finished the trolley with Watco, but I had to get this slightly larger than 4×8’ panel of MDF cut up to get a 48×3 inch piece as the finish layer on my sled’s back fence. Needed to do the glueup.

Here I have rested the panel while it is on the trolley on a project table and the band saw. It has two in line wheels. There are no attachments to the trolley. The panel needs to rest approximately at its center position on the trolley. The resting point is angled to force the panel into the upright, and this shifts the center of gravity of the average size 4×8’ panel to lie approximately over the wheels. So essentially the trolley is a bicycle with the panel sitting side saddle, except there is no seat just an upright to lie against.

This is the backside of this same panel on the trolley:

So then I put another project table near the panel, and then put my hands under the panel and lifted and slid it onto the project table. The trolley just fell backward a few inches and rested on the skirt of the project table. Neat. So not only was it easy to put the panel on the trolley, but with a little attention to balance the panel could then easily be steered(with the short wheel base it turns on a dime)out of the garage and into the shop. You can also tilt the front on the panel up by pushing the rear of the panel down and the wheels will then lift over obstacles. The trolley is forced by physics to stay attached to the panel. Then when the panel is rested against a table or sawhorse, there is space to put ones hands underneath the panel and lift and slide it over. No heroics needed.

Here is a full view of the trolley, after its coat of Watco:

And here is a picture that shows the angling of the resting point for a panel that forces the panel into the upright, and makes the trolley cling to the panel:

The trolley will not get frequent use, but any full panel 1/2 inch thick or more will get a ride on the trolley from storage into the shop…....

Construction
The body of the trolley is layered glued plywood, nothing is hollow. the axles are 5/8” bolts that I have had for 30 years, finally got some use out of them. The upright is glued to the body, and has a carriage bolt and two screws to attach to the body for strength. The upright is made of two 3/4inch plywood pieces glued and screwed.

The wheels are 3/4inch ply made with my new circle jig on my toy bandsaw. The angled piece is some fir cut at about a 30 deg angle.

If anyone wants to make one, I will put up pictures with full dimensions. I did this in Sketchup first. I just eyeballed some pictures in a ShopNotes review of the metal manufactured item, and came up with my dimensions. So if you want to make one….let me know.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska



27 comments so far

View lew's profile

lew

10034 posts in 2411 days


#1 posted 02-01-2010 01:05 AM

Sweet and very well made

Now if I could only figure out how to make one of these go up and down the stairs to the basement shop!

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2955 days


#2 posted 02-01-2010 01:14 AM

Very nice Jim,and a great way to use up plywood scraps.

This should be a great energy saver, for yourself.

Now you have to make something that’ll lift the panel on the table for you.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3663 posts in 1820 days


#3 posted 02-01-2010 01:16 AM

lew
Thanks for the comment, Lew. Actually if all you had were one step or a few steps then you could put a handle on the upright near the top to lift the panel and the trolley up a step or two. Wouldn’t work for a lot of steps. The one made in metal had a handle. My Sketchup drawing has a handle. But I don’t need one in my situation so I didn’t put one on it.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3663 posts in 1820 days


#4 posted 02-01-2010 01:18 AM

Dick
Actually in the same article in ShopNotes they had a device that helps. But you know, the biggest problem is getting your fingers underneath the panel, and the trolley has the panel already off the floor. It was a breeze to lift the panel up and onto the table. That was an unexpected benefit.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1888 days


#5 posted 02-01-2010 01:29 AM

Using plywood to move plywood. Excellent idea!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3663 posts in 1820 days


#6 posted 02-01-2010 01:48 AM

David
You are younger than me, and I will bet stronger than me. I am still pretty strong, well, very strong, but now when I exert maximal effort…....things tend to happen to me. So, I started to lift that panel, and said ohmygosh this is really heavy. And then I remembered that ShopNotes article, found it and stared at the trolley.

..........and of course, then my propensity to do antic stuff took over, and here is the plywood solution.

I figured you would understand this, because you use resources efficiently. This is right up your alley. But you may be able to still manhandle those panels without after effects. I never know at my age…....

........so I will use the trolley…........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2135 posts in 1765 days


#7 posted 02-01-2010 02:26 AM

Slick device Jim. Post it in Woodsmith and get a free Bosch mini-driver out of it :) Then you could have a portable tool for that handyman stuff you do in Maui without everyone thinking you are a terrorist at the airport…

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3663 posts in 1820 days


#8 posted 02-01-2010 02:39 AM

David Craig
I think you know me too well. Unfortunately this is a rip-off of a device ShopNotes was reviewing. Nothing original about the thought, the wood rendition is original. Of course Woodsmith might not be any the wiser.

But I think I’ll settle for a device that saves my back and doesn’t promote hernias, and used up some of my warped plywood….........(-:

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1469 posts in 2221 days


#9 posted 02-01-2010 03:06 AM

Looks like a good assisting jig Jim, and doesn’t take up much storage room. I’m like Lew with the basement stairs to deal with.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3663 posts in 1820 days


#10 posted 02-01-2010 03:34 AM

Timbo
Too bad about the stairs. This thing really works well. Takes one try to figure it out. But then it is obviously the way to go if you only have one or two stairs or a few bumps like me. Being compact helps also.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1888 days


#11 posted 02-01-2010 05:27 AM

Jim,

While I am younger, and in reasonable shape, and what isn’t quite right is an ongoing personal project. I was involved in a wreck years ago, that got me sedentary for too long, that and bad descisions added up to weight and weight related back troubles. My doc has both LOML and I on Weight Watchers, and I am much more active than I have been in years.

Having said that, even if I didn’t have the troubles I do, I am not too young to think that anything to help the back last longer isn’t a good thing…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112096 posts in 2233 days


#12 posted 02-01-2010 05:38 AM

Looks good Jim

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2955 days


#13 posted 02-01-2010 03:23 PM

I think you can build one of these using a large bike wheel, & front fork.

You can then attach it to a cradle to hold the plywood. The bike wheel should be able to handle the stairs, because of its large diameter.

There’s a lot of old bikes out there just waiting something for this.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View stefang's profile

stefang

13050 posts in 1990 days


#14 posted 02-01-2010 05:03 PM

A nice accessory for those that have to move those sheet goods a distance Jim. I liked the angle rest that forces the panel to sit vertical. Alas, I haven’t a need for one of these, not because I’m strong, but because my sheet storage is right next to may TS. I’m sure a lot of other folks will find it useful and will be grateful that you shared the idea.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3663 posts in 1820 days


#15 posted 02-01-2010 05:16 PM

a1Jim
Thanks Jim. It was an interesting item to make, and it does work. Dick
Neat idea for those who have stairs. Otherwise cutting it in two before going downstairs, or having two people move it around works. But of course, the idea this item, is it makes it easier for just one person. 15 years ago I could handl the panels, it was uncomfortable but not dangerous. Now I am too likely to pull a muscle or some such. Mike
My storage is about 25 feet away from where I cut them up. And you have to thread yourself between things. So for me it is useful.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

showing 1 through 15 of 27 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase