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Tips and Jigs for the Shop #8: Second Revision.......Super Sled Sketchup Design

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Blog entry by Jim Bertelson posted 1679 days ago 3779 reads 8 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Revised sled.......Soooper Sled Design Part 8 of Tips and Jigs for the Shop series Part 9: Tool Totes - Shop Tote for Small Tools and Instuments »

After much knashing of teeth and pulling of hair, I decided on a compromise.

1) I am going to use 3/4” plywood, which I have and can obtain that is flat, i.e. not warped. The weight is not significantly different than the 1/2” MDF. The loss in blade height of 1/4” is inconsequential, because very thick pieces would undoubtedly be narrower, and I would cut them with the RAS.
2) I am going back to the original back design of Scott and Nixon, i.e. 11.5”. I don’t need to worry about the plywood breaking off of it like the MDF. If it works for Scott and Nixon, it should work for me, and my plywood is thicker. Note that the wood the handle is attached to as well as the blade safety block will hold the pieces together until I make final adjustments of the main fence.
3) The rails (miter slides) will be 3/4”x1/8” aluminum bar backed up with 1/4” ply, hardboard, or MDF, I don’t think it is too important.
4) I went back to 28” protractor arms, since this size board can handle them.

So I am ready for the critique, throw your best punches…...................

Front view:

Back view:

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska



7 comments so far

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Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1763 days


#1 posted 1679 days ago

Here is the Sketchup File for the Soooper Sled

Soooper Sled Sketchup File

The only object I downloaded was some thread for the bolts, which I then modified in a number of ways. The Rockler star knobs are original, I couldn’t find the exact item in the warehouse. Feel free to use anything in the file anyway you want. I turned off the shadows, since they take a lot of processing. Choose edge or profile in the edge style under the view menu item.

I have opened another blog item for the textures,

Sketchup Texture Blog

which I used in this drawing, as well as many others designed for woodworking. This will be a work in progress and I will update it and notify people in that blog item when updates occur.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1763 days


#2 posted 1679 days ago

And by the way, you can move the top bolt thread or the bottom into the knob. This is 5/16” stuff. You can downscale the thread for 1/4”. If someone is interested, I can make a series of Rockler Star knobs with various thread and ends, as well as the hold downs, which I just got, so I can measure and recreate them in Sketchup.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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stefang

12580 posts in 1933 days


#3 posted 1679 days ago

Hey Jim. It will be interesting to see the finished sled and to see how you like it. It looks really flexible, and so should make it easy for you to make quite a variety of really accurate cuts without too much fuss. Good luck with the build.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1763 days


#4 posted 1678 days ago

Mike
Thanks for the view, now I am doing a starter project today, a type of tote, or organizer for measurement tools and other small stuff. Hopefully I will get it done today and get some pictures. Then on to the sled. I need that for my next project for the office, although I could do it without it, but it provides impetus to get the sled done.

Dave
Thanks so much for the critique. On my computer and with my file the arms and the fences are on the face of the base. But those two structures underwent so many changes and permutations, that I wouldn’t be surprised to see anything occur. The back fence in particular got changed a lot. I did this in more detail than I might of needed, but it was a training project for me, and now I feel much more proficient. Always feel free to publicly critique my stuff, its how we learn, and I am sure I will never reach your level of proficiency. We all appreciate that you take the time to help and teach us…..you are to be commended.

I wasn’t aware that Sketchup would save the unused textures and components in the file. The last 3D modeler I used didn’t do that, although in earlier versions it did. I will delete those and resave the file.

As for the construction, we’ll see. I approach the squaring of the main fence with some trepidation, but I usually get that stuff right just because I am so compulsive about those things. I am worried about the weight, not that I won’t be able to handle it, but if it is clumsy then it won’t get much use. It is big, but there was no sense in making a small one, because I do that stuff on the RAS. It is faster and safer, and it is at least as accurate, and has a clean cut.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1763 days


#5 posted 1678 days ago

Dave
Is it sufficient to just click “Purge Unused” in the Model Info – Statistics to get rid of the unused materials and components? That brought the file from 3.3 mb to 1.9 mb. Is that what you got?

Oh, and thanks for the suggestion on the slots, I was just slavishly copying John Nixon’s PDF on his super sled. I’ll have to evaluate that but it makes sense to me. You know, now that I am using 3/4” ply, I could imbed T track there instead of relying on the routing. I am thinking I will do that.

By making the drawing I am trying to avoid a lot of pitfalls, as well as learning SU. It has made me rethink some some of the sled, especially comparing it to my first rendition. It is cheaper and easier than finding out your mistakes or design deficiencies in the shop.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1763 days


#6 posted 1678 days ago

Dave
Beat it up Dave, because it is a lot faster than having to ferret out all this stuff myself. I have very thick skin, and am used to constructive criticism as a part of my job. We are always critiquing and exchanging information there, and nobody knows everything, or is a master of everthing in my profession.

Ah, I didn’t know there was a difference between painting the component as a whole and each face individually. Didn’t realize that the component had a “wrapper” that was an entity, I thought it was purely a collection of the parts. The thread I imported from someone else, I will reverse the faces. I suspect the T- track faces got reversed when I cut them with a boolean operation. Some of this stuff happened because I was making rapid changes, and those arms changed out about three times, going from 24 to 28 to 24 and then finally back to 28”.

I moved the global axes on purpose, to help with some positioning, and forgot to move them back. Which fence are you talking about?

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1763 days


#7 posted 1678 days ago

Dave
Thanks for the monochrome tip. Wasn’t aware of that.

I changed my back face color to green also, good tip, never looked at that dialog, looked briefly for some other settings a while back, but didn’t have time to pursue it. Now I know where to look

I ‘defloated’ the components. Since the T bolts are part of those components, the wood face isn’t the first thing the component trys to locate on an adjacent face. I am sure the back fence got corrupted when I inadvisably used some booleans as a matter of convenience, when I should have just been pushing faces. I have learned to use the boolean stuff sparingly.

This is my big learning project for Sketchup, so thanks for the help. I tend to move rapidly to complex stuff with graphics programs because of my other graphics experience, so I end up with some crazy results until I learn the quirks of each program. I don’t think I will ever get into it as deep as you, but I need to know enough to make some complex drawings rapidly, so I burned a lot of hours getting used to SU.

If you think of anything else let me know, this has been a great help.

Thanks again, Dave.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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