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Glueing up panels???

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Blog entry by janice posted 1631 days ago 2374 reads 1 time favorited 33 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Just curious about this. Is there a general rule on how wide your boards should be that your are glueing up for a panel to keep them from cuping? I was also told years ago but never found it to help, that you should rip one board with the grain down, then the next one with it up. Is that true and if so, why do mine sometimes fit perfect on one side and not the other side? What am I doing wrong. This gets so aggrevating. I feel like I’m not learning anything over the years, I just keep trying till it turns out right, which is taking too much time. But I must be doing something wrong. Any advise would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

-- Janice



33 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2173 days


#1 posted 1631 days ago

Janice
When gluing panels its good to keep your broad sizes down . some folks take wide boards an rip them into smaller boards and keep the same sequence. Were some people have problems with panels is the clamp only from one side instead of alternating one clamp up and on down. Another problem is people don’t joint there wood first or there jointer is is not set at 90 degrees so when the clamp and glue up the boards they don’t want to stay flat.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View janice's profile

janice

1082 posts in 2021 days


#2 posted 1631 days ago

HI Jim, thanks. But do you mean one clamp on top and one underneath? I’m not getting the jointer comment either. I use my router with a biscuit cutter attached. I set the depth so that it is in the center of the thickness of the wood.

-- Janice

View degoose's profile

degoose

6967 posts in 1950 days


#3 posted 1631 days ago

What Jim Said….!!
the edges must be jointed square so that they fit snugly without clamps… then glue and clamp… alternating the clamps over and under the boards…also alternating the growth ring up and then down does seem to stop cupping of the panel.. unless they are Quarter Sawn..
Hope this helps!

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View lew's profile

lew

9937 posts in 2351 days


#4 posted 1631 days ago

When you say “fit on one side but not the other”, it could be some of your boards are different thicknesses. It is not unusual for 3/4” boards to vary slightly in thickness. To help solve this problem, try running all your stock thru the thickness planer before you do any other milling. Get everything the same thickness.

Another thing that can happen is that the boards might slip slightly during clamping, causing unevenness. Biscuits can help reduce this type of alignment problems. Using culls can also help keep all of the boards flat during clamping.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View janice's profile

janice

1082 posts in 2021 days


#5 posted 1630 days ago

Okay, thanks guys. I get the over and under now. But jointed square? I use a square and draw lines on all boards, is that all you mean? I wouldnt say they fit snug without clamps though.

-- Janice

View janice's profile

janice

1082 posts in 2021 days


#6 posted 1630 days ago

Okay Lew, what is a cull? I didnt take shop class, there is so much I don’t know. : )

-- Janice

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2173 days


#7 posted 1630 days ago

Larry covered it. A jointer makes sure the edges of your boards a square ,like larry said when together the fit together with out clamping. If you don’t have a jointer you might consider geting one.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View janice's profile

janice

1082 posts in 2021 days


#8 posted 1630 days ago

I don’t have one Jim. Great another tool I need. Thanks everyone.

-- Janice

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2173 days


#9 posted 1630 days ago

Depending on your budget Grizzly has some good tools

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View kolwdwrkr's profile

kolwdwrkr

2821 posts in 2186 days


#10 posted 1630 days ago

when glueing up panels it is wise to keep your boards 4” and under in width. It is more likely to cup when wider. I have also been taught to flip every other board so the grain goes up, down, up, down. If it is up, up, up then it is likely to cup down, and vise versa. I personally think this is only a problem if the wood is not dried to an acceptable percentage, and is the same percentage throughout, as well as changes in humidity. So you are less likely to have a problem with the panel if it is built in your shop then kept locally, as opposed to sending it from the mountains to the coast. Essentially, there are many aspects that can cause problems. You don’t need to spline, busicuit, or use any other joinery for gluing up panels, especially doors. Edge gluing is efficient with modern adhesives. The exception may be a scenario where there could be tension. If you are running a groove and spline on the router you would have to be sure to have all the faces up. If you are flipping every other one, then be sure to flip them and mark the show face. This face would be up. That way you shouldn’t have a problem getting them at least flush on one side. They would be flush on the side facing the router table.
If you don’t have a jointer you can make a jig for your table saw that will true up one face. Then you can rotate it and cut the other side straight. If your saw leaves rough saw marks this could present a problem. Simply get a better blade. There are probably straight edge jigs posted here, and I’ve seen them often in FWW.

-- ~ Inspiring those who inspire me ~

View janice's profile

janice

1082 posts in 2021 days


#11 posted 1630 days ago

I will check it out, probably tomorrow for now I have to go to bed. Thanks again.

-- Janice

View lew's profile

lew

9937 posts in 2351 days


#12 posted 1630 days ago

Sorry,
A cull is simply a board that is clamped across your glued up panel. This board is clamped “down” on the panel so that it puts pressure on the panel boards and holds them flat. Some culls are slightly bowed so that they put more pressure in the center of the panel as they are clamped into place.

You can clamp one on the top of the panel and one on the bottom or position the cull over the bar or pipe of you clamp and fasten it there.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2173 days


#13 posted 1630 days ago

Good point Lew

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Gary's profile

Gary

6960 posts in 2029 days


#14 posted 1630 days ago

Also have to make sure the squeeze out does not come in contact with the cull…

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View scrappy's profile

scrappy

3505 posts in 2026 days


#15 posted 1630 days ago

Wrap the cull in a layer of wax paper and it will not get glued to your panel. also put wax paper between your clamp bars and the boards. That way you don’t have to scrape them kleen after.

Just things I have read on here before. Hope this helps.

Scrappy

-- Scrap Wood's the best...the projects are smaller, and so is the mess!

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