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Leg vise fix

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Blog entry by james3one posted 605 days ago 1171 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I decided that I liked the idea of a leg vice. But when I saw that peg board at the bottom I wasn’t impressed. I could imagine having to bend over to set and reset that thing and got a back-ache just thinking about it. Not to mention a headache every time I went to change the setting which puts ones head very close to some very hard items. I decided that there had to be a better way.

This is what I came up with. A very simple wedge. Kick one side to set , and the other to release. No bending over, no fuss, no muss.

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This is just one variation that i’m working on. But my view is that simple is best, as most engineers would agree. Not sure that the split board will work well and I’ve got a simpler idea in mind for the final version.

J

-- James, Tulsa OK,



12 comments so far

View camps764's profile

camps764

775 posts in 963 days


#1 posted 605 days ago

funny…just read a popular woodworking blog from Schwartz on this very topic this morning!

-- Steve. Follow me on Instagram: http://instagram.com/campbellwoodworking or check me out on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/campbellwoodworkingne

View james3one's profile

james3one

41 posts in 1376 days


#2 posted 605 days ago

Steve – I’ve had this idea for a while, but haven’t had time to implement. I saw the same article this morning as well and decided to post this. I was bothered by how complex their solutions were.

-- James, Tulsa OK,

View jap's profile

jap

1225 posts in 658 days


#3 posted 605 days ago

nice idea

-- Joel

View Boatman53's profile

Boatman53

817 posts in 800 days


#4 posted 605 days ago

That is very clever, but did you know the force on the parallel beam can exceed 400 pounds!! I measured mine when I was doing the R&D for this devise I’m now marketing. Very simple to install on an existing vise.
http://ancorayachtservice.com/?page_id=221
Here are a couple of reviews.
http://festoolownersgroup.com/other-tool-reviews/roubo-bench-modification/
http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolReviews/AYSLegViseChainAdjuster.html
There are many ways to do it and people have been working on this for at least 128 years because that is how old the patent was that I based my work on.
Jim

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

View james3one's profile

james3one

41 posts in 1376 days


#5 posted 604 days ago

Really? Jim. You’re using my blog to promote a product? As I recall woodworkers have been using wedge vises to hold their pieces for a long time. It isn’t a new idea. Given the surface area of my final design that works out to only 64 lbs. PSI. Give or take. I think the maple i’ll be using can handle that. If not i’ll try something else. Just don’t want that much machinery on my bench.

-- James, Tulsa OK,

View Boatman53's profile

Boatman53

817 posts in 800 days


#6 posted 604 days ago

Sorry no offense meant to your blog I just know I was surprised how much force was generated and if it didn’t work for you I thought you might like to know what I had worked on. I am all for figuring out new ways of doing things. I do it all the time, keep up the good work. If you want me to delete my post I will be glad too. Thank you for sharing, that is all I was doing.

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

1485 posts in 1031 days


#7 posted 604 days ago

Hi James, If the wedge thing won’t hold then cut a 1/2” deep saw tooth pattern on the “peg board” with a corresponding fixed insert in the leg. Then the clever wedge you thought up will do the locking in each position.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View james3one's profile

james3one

41 posts in 1376 days


#8 posted 604 days ago

Say, exelectrician. Thought about an interlocking sawtooth pattern to work in conjunction with the wedge, while I was writing my last reply. So that there would be more than just the friction of wood on wood. I’d have to invert the position of the parts, putting the wedge on top. That puts the smooth part of the ‘peg board’ on bottom for ease of movement. My only concern would be adding to the complexity of the parts and the fact that those teeth may start to break off with lots of use. I’m going to start with the less is more approach and see how far I can take that.

Jim, glad to have the feedback. Helps me think things through. Just that the reply seemed a little too much. Slightly annoying and helpful at the same time. It is quite possible, however, that I enjoy every opportunity to complain about stuff. Leave the post. Has good info for anyone working on this.

-- James, Tulsa OK,

View Boatman53's profile

Boatman53

817 posts in 800 days


#9 posted 604 days ago

Thanks James, another thing about the forces on the beam. I measured 400 lbs at my beam that was 18” from the screw. Some of the beams on the benches being built from BenchCrafted plans have the beam as close as 12” and at that distance I measured 600 lbs. You have drawn yours down near the floor so that is a good thing. When do you think you might do a prototype?
Jim

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

View james3one's profile

james3one

41 posts in 1376 days


#10 posted 604 days ago

Jim, after the holidays. Seasonal demands are going to keep me out of the woodshop for a while.

I’d let the vise ride on the floor if I thought i could get away with it. The i.d. from board to screw is right at 22”. That will tend to allow a slight bend in the vise which will only add to the friction at the foot. The leg of the prototype will be done in a softer wood. Should exaggerate the issues that are likely to come up. I have a nice chunk of 8/4 beech for the vise itself. I have three or four permutations of this design floating around in my head. I’ll probably make a test piece and over-stress it just to see what it takes to blow out the bottom of that leg.

J

-- James, Tulsa OK,

View Boatman53's profile

Boatman53

817 posts in 800 days


#11 posted 604 days ago

I’ve seen some with wheels on the bottom of the leg itself. Thought about that for mine but my floor is not even close to level. I have a wheel supporting the beam itself, just on the inside of the leg. If you can figure out how to get a wheel under to support the weight of the chop and screw it is deffinatly worth while.
Jim

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

View james3one's profile

james3one

41 posts in 1376 days


#12 posted 604 days ago

I’ve seen a wheel assist and it looked good. Going to keep things as simple as possible. reduce and refine. As it is, using a metal screw was a bit of a compromise. Much of what I make is reproduction furniture using, as often as possible, old hand tools. I enjoy the hand work and its a bit of a selling point. More Roy and less Norm. When I get more room and demand leans more to furniture I’ll tool up. That includes my bench.

I do appreciate bouncing the ideas around. Keeps my brain engaged.

Speaking of which, brain is working on new concept. Got a flash while writing this. Will post if it gels.

Thanks for the input.
Have a great week.
J

-- James, Tulsa OK,

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