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Steve Ramsey's chess board #9: Trials and tribulations

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Blog entry by Jake posted 222 days ago 891 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 8: Surface coating in progress Part 9 of Steve Ramsey's chess board series no next part

I can’t help myself, I just keep messing up… The Trials and tribulations of being an amateur. Started sanding yesterday

Since I did not fille the wood pores (did not find a suitable product in our hardware stores) the laquer was all over the places in ridges and valleys and to get it all even I should have put atleast 7 more coats on, then I could confortably sand it down to totally flat.

But after first 20 minutes of handsanding

I went to 400 grit OS.

And that didn’t work out quite as I wanted either, the sandpaper was clogging up so much, had to change it every few minutes, really need to get my hands on a wet ROS paper.

Of course, at this point I should realize that I have sanded off a lot of lacquer and I should be considering different options already…But that is not what I do…. against all of your guys better judgement, what do I do?

That is correct, I switch to 320 ROS….Of course, at this point with brand new ROS 320 paper I make a mistake. :)

At this point I am just like @£$€!!!!! this POS, BS project… and I go to figuring out another option. Since the base laquer was a semi-gloss I run to the shop, grab a can of high gloss spray on lacquer, I figure I can coat it with that and see what happens, since the base is very flat now it might cover it up nicely, but you never know. (This is where I should have started by the way, but being an amateur I did not ask specifically for spray on lacquer before I started this project, I went with a brush on version)

I come back form the shop, cover that little piece with the brush on lacquer, leave it to dry and go to play bandminton to vent off some of the steam. Return 3 hours later, put handles on my drawers and do a test piece with the spray on laquer – on just wood it works well, so if it doesn’t bring the top on to shine with the current base coat of semigloss lacquer I will have the option to sand the top all down to wood and do a new build up with spray on. The big advantage is that it dries in like 15 minutes, so I can still deliver the piece this Satruday or Sunday.

Boy do I love to learn new things but I hate that I need to learn by making mistakes, especially when I make these mistakes by specifically going against your guys expertiese. :)

Anyhow, today when I get back home I will start coating the top and lining the drawers with felt, I am determined to win, even if that does mean that I need to sand the top down to bare wood and start from scratch. I have put in too much work to quit now. And I need to start work on my kitchen next week. I got a lot ofprojects coming up, can’t afford to push the project for another week.

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.



11 comments so far

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1176 posts in 1248 days


#1 posted 222 days ago

Do you want a really glossy surface? Spraying satin lacquer will give a moderate sheen, not that really glossy, glass like sheen. I dont particularly like the super glossy look. I think it detracts from the look of the contrasting woods. Single color projects look OK glossy. That said take it down a little more with 400 grit wet dry sand paper. Use 1/4 sheets cut from a full sheet. Fold twice giving you four sanding surfaces. Reshoot with rattle can. Light coats, do not overspray. Put on three or four coats. Let it cure overnight at room temp (that is indoor room temp) Hit it again with 600 lightly you are just knocking down the nibs. You should be left with a VERY smooth surface. Shoot one or two more coats. Again with the 600 VERY lightly. But please let the lacquer dry overnight. The paper should load with white powder. You can feel/hear when you are there. A light rub with 1000 grit if you want a little more sheen. Then wax with paste wax. Two coats will do. The surface will feel sooooo smooth.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1176 posts in 1248 days


#2 posted 222 days ago

by the way I shoot that brushing lacquer with EXCELLENT results.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1176 posts in 1248 days


#3 posted 222 days ago

and when you are getting close to wood with the ROS, stop. Go to hand sanding. You want to leave the lacquer in the pores of the wood. DO NOT OVERSAND. You have a nice ‘fill’ with the lacquer.
The nice thing about wet/dry is you can rinse it for a fresh cut.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View Jake's profile

Jake

270 posts in 255 days


#4 posted 222 days ago

Thank you very much for the detailed explanation, it is highly needed and appreciated!

Unfortunately I only have about 24 hours until delivery, otherwise I will have another week in between since we live in different cities, so I might just go with like 4 coats of spray lacquer tonight, let it dry and do a light sanding with 1000 or 1500 to get it smooth, then wax it and deliver it tomorrow.

Hopefully it will work.

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

View stefang's profile

stefang

12861 posts in 1958 days


#5 posted 222 days ago

I like to use some auto rubbing compound on the last coat. It leaves a super smooth surface which looks polished and very clear rather than just shiny. It is great to the touch as well. Not a good idea for open grain woods though as the polish will stick in the pores.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Jake's profile

Jake

270 posts in 255 days


#6 posted 222 days ago

Stefang can you reccomend any European products that you use for filling in pores? I can’t seem to find anything here, since most all of the youtube videos and step-by-step isntructions seem to come from the States.

I would have used a wood filler if I only had found any. the auto compound seems to be a great idea, I will use it in my next projects if I find a wood pore filler. :)

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1176 posts in 1248 days


#7 posted 222 days ago

You can certainly use the finish as the pore filler. With repeated coats and light sand back the pores will fill with your finish. With this project I think you would have been disappointed with a filler. The filler color is matched to the color of the wood, or dark with dark wood etc. You may have done yourself a favor with the brushing of lacquer as you got a fairly thick coat and sanded it back.
I hope every thing turns out. You have built a very nice board. The recipient will be VERY pleased.
We as craftsman are our own worst enemys/critics.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View sgmdwk's profile

sgmdwk

259 posts in 497 days


#8 posted 221 days ago

For future reference. I have had best luck using foam brushes with polyurethane finishes. It is important to just brush it on and leave it alone. Don’t keep going back over the same area. I sand lightly with 400 grit between coats, then I also use automotive polishing compound, and finally a good auto wax. I like New Finish.

Anyway, that is what I did on the chess board I gave my son and daughter in law for Christmas, and the finish turned out pretty well.

-- Dave K.

View Jake's profile

Jake

270 posts in 255 days


#9 posted 221 days ago

Thank you all for your help and encouragement!

The project is finished, just buffing the wax left now. Going to deliver it in a few hours, I will post the last entry and project when I have time.

Once again, thank you all for your words of encouragement and help, I could have not done it without you!

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

View InsideTheBox's profile

InsideTheBox

43 posts in 298 days


#10 posted 114 days ago

Jake—Just reading up on your process, as I am embarking on a new chess board project for a friend. But then I got caught up in the story and am curious about the final, FINAL product.

Did your father love it? Was it incredible? Want to see photos of the final and maybe even one with your father’s smile.
:)

-- There's no such thing as a mistake; only a quick change of plans.

View Jake's profile

Jake

270 posts in 255 days


#11 posted 114 days ago

Sorry, as always, when the project got finished I did not end the blog as I should have and I probably won’t, but here’s the end product:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/95459

In addition to all I wrote in my blog, there is one more consideration, if you are going to inlay the drawers with felt, you might consider using carpet tape or hot glue, I used soem genereic, pretty strong double sided tape, but the felt is peeling off a bit, so I am probably going to redo that part during the summer, other than that, the project seems to be holding up nicely, over the last almost 5 months it does not yet show any cracks or anything, so I must have done something right, which is a good change of pace. :)

Best of luck with your project!

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

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