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Steve Ramsey's chess board #8: Surface coating in progress

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Blog entry by Jake posted 196 days ago 655 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Drawers made a lot of hand sanding to be done Part 8 of Steve Ramsey's chess board series Part 9: Trials and tribulations »

I know I said I wouldn’t post before I am finished, but I can’t help myself. I started putting on coats of laquer yesterday, will finish up today with 7 coats on the top and on the drawer fronts and 2 coats on everywhere else. Then i will start handpolishing tomorrow to have the present ready for delivery by saturday.

I really just wanted to show off the big difference in laquer and no laquer versions. I was a bit hesitant at first, because I was not sure how the laquer would make the chess board look. But after searching around for my balls and finding them I just went ahead and put the laquer on without worrying about it…

And it looks great!!

Before coating, sanded to 320 (actually sanded top and drawers to 400, just did not take pic of that) By the way the cabinet that can be seen partially in the background is also made by me, my very first project to be honest. :)

After first 2 coats of laquer:

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.



6 comments so far

View sgmdwk's profile

sgmdwk

258 posts in 469 days


#1 posted 196 days ago

It is exciting to put on that first coat of finish and see the grain pop, isn’t it?

-- Dave K.

View Jake's profile

Jake

248 posts in 227 days


#2 posted 196 days ago

Very exciting indeed! In an hour I will have the last coat put on. Then it will be a long 24th wait for the laquer to cure then I can finally start the finishing.

Any suggestions on hand rubbed finish? I am thinking of starting off with 400 grit ROS at speed 1 to flatten it out quickly then go with wet hand sanding through the grits to 1500

Or do you think the start with 400 ROS would be too aggressive and I should only do it by hand? A lot of what I found on YouTube they started at 320 by hand, so I want to think that ROS 400 grit would be ok.

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

View kenn's profile

kenn

779 posts in 2316 days


#3 posted 195 days ago

Don’t chance the ROS! This looks too good at this point to worry about a little elbow grease. Hand sand it, start at 320 or 400, wipe it down between grits. Use a sanding block to help keep it flat. Good luck, you are almost there.

-- Every cloud has a silver lining

View Jake's profile

Jake

248 posts in 227 days


#4 posted 195 days ago

Alright, thanks for the input, elbow grease it is!

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

View sgmdwk's profile

sgmdwk

258 posts in 469 days


#5 posted 195 days ago

I’d stay away from the ROS, too. It would be a real shame to mess things up, and it could happen real quick. A chess board is small enough that hand sanding, with a block, using wet/dry paper, isn’t really very tedious.

-- Dave K.

View Jake's profile

Jake

248 posts in 227 days


#6 posted 195 days ago

Thanks for your input, in general terms What do you think, how long will hand sanding take. I realise the first grit will be the longest to get our all perfectly flat. But going through 400/600/800/1000/1200/1500/felt pad/lamb wool. What kind of time I am looking at.

2 hours, 4, or 10? I am trying to figure out if I can afford to let the lacquer cure until Friday, to sand on Saturday morning or not…

Any input would be appreciated as I am having trouble finding any reliable info.

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

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