LumberJocks

Steve Ramsey's chess board #5: Paying stupid tax

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Jake posted 12-28-2013 07:28 PM 826 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Getting somewhere, no going back form handplanes Part 5 of Steve Ramsey's chess board series Part 6: Getting close to the finish line »

A friendly reminder to be safe in the shop!

Pic really tells most of the story

Got very stupid and very lucky all at the same time. Was cutting the inlays for the top of the chess board. (the bottom is glued up already).

Was running some maple through the tablesaw to get some thin strips, as they were going through I figured I should catch them from the other side, because they were moving a bit… And the funny thing is , right before that I thought that – “Gee this is exactly the kind of place where I should use pushsticks” (Which i do 95% of the time to be honest, I just had been running the table saw for the full day and I wanted to get this part over with, which meant that I was “in a hurry” and careless all at the same time, never a winning combination)

Cue a slip of the finger, a lapse of concentration or whatever and my thumb meeting the tablesaw. I got extremely lucky, the cut was a bit less than 1/2”, only needed 1 stich, did not cut the fingernail or the bone, just threw out a chunk of meat and skin.

So yeah, here’s my stupid tax paid for this year, luckily it was a very cheap fare to go around this time. I am taking 2 days off now, maybe only a small glue up tomorrow, no powertools.

Also extending the deadline by a week for this project, I am sure my dad would prefer me with 10 fingers and the present 1 week late, rather than me with 9 1/2 fingers and project on time.

Again, just a friendly reminder, keep safe fellow LJ’s!

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.



13 comments so far

View whitebeast88's profile

whitebeast88

3524 posts in 845 days


#1 posted 12-28-2013 07:34 PM

glad to hear your injury wasn’t more serious.i kow i’v been in a hurry before andshouldn’t be.i really tried lately to quit if i’m tired or get to rushing to much.hope you heal quickly.thanks for the reminder..

-- Marty.Athens,AL

View NormG's profile

NormG

4175 posts in 1658 days


#2 posted 12-28-2013 09:56 PM

Sounds like you were very lucky indeed. It does not take much for serious injury

-- Norman

View Jake's profile

Jake

290 posts in 285 days


#3 posted 12-28-2013 10:28 PM

I feel lucky. Can’t sleep at the moment, thinking of all the worse case scenarios. I know for sure that I got lucky with a small reminder of what not to do.

Also, looking forward to doing some handplaning and sawing tomorrow.

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1166 posts in 1514 days


#4 posted 12-28-2013 10:32 PM

Damn Jake!

How many times do I have to tell ya…

Be Careful!

Glad it wasn’t worse (and I know about worse…) Hope your recuperation goes well.

Again…

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3133 posts in 1330 days


#5 posted 12-29-2013 01:14 AM

I read your post and will have to get on your case. Don’t use a push stick 95% of the time. If it is a narrow piece use a push stick. Sorry for the injury. Mark it up as a lesson learned and keep alert.

View Jake's profile

Jake

290 posts in 285 days


#6 posted 12-29-2013 08:43 AM

Thanks for that Grandpa, this is the exact thing my grandpa would tell me. Instead of feeling sorry for me, he’d make sure I get the lesson. I love it, oldschool. :)

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

View CincyRW's profile

CincyRW

67 posts in 305 days


#7 posted 12-30-2013 03:12 PM

Glad to hear you’re OK and there doesn’t appear to be any long lasting injuries. I really appreciate you sharing this with us. I don’t know how many times I’ve not been fully focused on something because I was thinking about the next step.

Maybe we should have a “near miss / close call” category on the blogs.

Again – glad this wasn’t any worse.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15798 posts in 1521 days


#8 posted 12-30-2013 03:27 PM

I’m glad that you came out of it with just a superficial wound. You were very fortunate but you can be sure that it can happen to anyone who suffers a moment where they are in a hurry or not concentrating.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Jake's profile

Jake

290 posts in 285 days


#9 posted 12-31-2013 05:27 AM

Warning, graphic image for some vieweres, viewer discretion is adviced… :)

The cut is healing up nicely, and the chessboard is moving on nicely as well, glued up the top yesterday, puttin in the inlyas today, then I will square up both bottom and top (obviously I could not make them uniform size… :)) and after that i will make a new entry showing how far along I am currently.

Here is a pic of the finger:

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1166 posts in 1514 days


#10 posted 12-31-2013 05:55 AM

Ouch!

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Jake's profile

Jake

290 posts in 285 days


#11 posted 12-31-2013 08:02 AM

Nah, no ouch anymore, only thing that is still hurting is my ego. :)

I was doing research yesterday about safety in the shop, and i found that I have been a moron with my tablesaw “safety” mainly due to the fact that I have ever seen it used one way all through my life and thought that was the way to go. Made a lot of adjustments yesterday, taking a lot of time to think eveyrthing through, first safety and then execution, so this accident was a good thing for me.

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

View prospector45's profile

prospector45

129 posts in 385 days


#12 posted 01-02-2014 01:05 PM

Jake,
Similar story here, lucky my neighbor is an orthopedic surgeon. The finger will heasl, but the memory will guide us for a long time. I even left the blood drops on the floor as a reminder to slow down and be careful
A great teacher will share the knowledge. What adjustments did you make? Teach us!!!

-- Skilled craftsman are not cheap, cheap craftsman are not skilled. Bert, Wooster

View Jake's profile

Jake

290 posts in 285 days


#13 posted 01-02-2014 08:49 PM

Main adjustments in no particular order:

1. Put my riving knife on the TS (didn’t even know it had to be there) then I took it off, because I can’t use my riving knife with my sleds, but as I did that I ONLY do my cust with a sled now, if I ever need to make a cut without it, the riving knife goes on. I’d rather ‘lose’ 20 minutes putting it on, than taking the 2 hours to go to the trauma centre

2. I leave the shop as soon as i feel tiered, I take a break and return in 1-2 hours

3. I always use a sanding mask when sanding.

4. I screw fences on the sled to fasten my detail if I need to, if i need to go closer than 2” to the blade, I rather make a few screw holes in my sled and make a new sled in 6 months, but I will clamp it down however I can and keep my hands away, even if I use a push stick.

5. I turn the TS off and wait for the blade to stop nefore removing any pieces from the sled.

While these might be pretty self-evident for my fellow LJ’s, this is a whole new approach to me, before all of my safety was just to try to eliminate kickback and try to stay out of the way if a kickback might occur… But after watching videos of accidents on youtube, I realised what an idiot I had been. In general, I take more time now to be safe, screw the deadline, I’d rather keep my limbs attached to this lovely body. :)

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase