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Dewalt 746 Restoration #1: Purchase and initial cleanup

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Blog entry by ihadmail posted 01-24-2017 04:36 AM 2562 reads 0 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Dewalt 746 Restoration series Part 2: Further cleaning, disassembly and inspection »

I upgraded from a Dewalt 7491RS job site saw to a neglected 746 today. The saw has had very little use, and subsequently very little care.


The photos on the CL add didn’t look this bad, so I hooked onto my trailer and drove two hours to get it. He was asking $400 firm which I thought was steep, but the saw was about the size I wanted for my garage and the sliding table was enticing.

Once I could put my hands on the saw I regretted making the drive somewhat. The rust was deeper than I expected. It covered the entirety of the cast components. I pointed all of this out to him and explained that I didn’t want the drive to be wasted. We finally settled on $300 although I’m not certain either of us were truly happy with the deal.

It’s not all bad, the sliding table still operates very smoothly. There is no play in the slides either. The mobile base is nice and functions properly. The rise and tilt of the blade function nicely still. The motor is quiet and has much less vibration than I expected. Did I already mention that with it having a 30” fence it fits in my garage just as I wanted it to?

Ok, on to business. First up after unloading it was to form an atrack plan. I grabbed my angle grinder and a wire wheel to knock some rust off and see just how bad it was. This would become step one of my atrack on the rust.

The top began to clean up nicely, surprisingly. So I pulled the steel extension wing off and went to town on the top. I ran the grinder until my hands became numb. This is the result after approximately 1 hour of nonstop wire wheel action.

Tomorrow I am hoping to be able to finish the rough removal on the top. The next step will be to begin disassembling the saw and remove the rust from everything. I will be painting the parts that need it and using boeshield on those parts that don’t get painted. After I reassemble the saw I will be hitting the top with my random orbital to remove some of the pitting that was caused by the rusting.

I’m undecided if I want to spend the money importing the needed parts from the U.K. to convert it over to a true riving knife saw or if I simply want to build some splitters of various heights and swap them out as I’ve seen a few others write about.

On to part two: http://lumberjocks.com/ihadmail/blog/101098



21 comments so far

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

308 posts in 791 days


#1 posted 01-24-2017 02:30 PM

Did you use the cup wire wheel or the flat one most of the time? Those cup wheels almost take you for a ride

View ihadmail's profile

ihadmail

61 posts in 328 days


#2 posted 01-24-2017 05:54 PM

I ended up using the flat wheel for most of the removal and the cup wheel to make the pattern left on the iron a little more consistent.

You’re right the cup wheel on those small body grinders will shake and pull all over the place.

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

308 posts in 791 days


#3 posted 01-24-2017 07:46 PM

would evaporust help with any of the clean up?

View ihadmail's profile

ihadmail

61 posts in 328 days


#4 posted 01-24-2017 07:53 PM



would evaporust help with any of the clean up?

- corelz125

It may, but I already have the grinders and wire wheels. I have a dremel and plenty of wire wheels for it also to get the small tight areas. I don’t see the need to spend any more money on things that effectively reach the same result as the items I already have on hand.

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

308 posts in 791 days


#5 posted 01-24-2017 11:00 PM

Yea still have to give it a little polish after the evaporust with a wire wheel. If you do get it I get a gallon of evaporust from harbor freight and with the 20% off doesn’t hurt the wallet to bad.

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1040 posts in 1744 days


#6 posted 01-25-2017 01:57 AM

I’ve had that saw with the sliding table since it came out. It’s never disappointed me, very good saw. Consider looking at the shark guard (or just the splitter) from Leeway. I have it and it works really well. Three different height splitters that install and remove without tools.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View ihadmail's profile

ihadmail

61 posts in 328 days


#7 posted 01-25-2017 02:58 AM

Thank you for that recommendation. I looked at those last night. If I don’t go the european riving knife direction I may pick one of those up. I’ve emailed a few of the UK parts suppliers for a shipped quote on all of the parts needed for a conversion as none of their websites are set up directly for USA shipping.

View jgt1942's profile

jgt1942

196 posts in 1703 days


#8 posted 01-25-2017 09:54 AM

You have an excellent opportunity to put your router to either side of the table. When I purchased my saw the guy I got it from was closing his shop and sold me a bunch of stuff for $1500 which included the saw, router table (with Incra positioner), two routers, drill press and a bunch of misc stuff.

When I upgraded the riving knife I raised my saw about 6 inches to match my workbench. I’m about 6’ 1” and for me the saw was too low. I just used 4×4’s to extend the height. In my shop I cannot move the saw thus loosing the mobile base was no big deal for me. I still have it just incase I decide to revert back.

On my todo list is to add a folding runout table. I’ve got the plans but that is as far as I got.

-- JohnT

View NormG's profile

NormG

5869 posts in 2818 days


#9 posted 01-27-2017 12:13 AM

With some work you have a great saw, that will be around for a long time

-- Norman - I never never make a mistake, I just change the design.

View ihadmail's profile

ihadmail

61 posts in 328 days


#10 posted 01-27-2017 12:24 AM

John I cannot mount a router table to the left of the saw as I’d prefer. The sliding table will not mount to the right of the table saw and it’s more important to me than router table placement. That sliding table still functioning properly was the ultimate thing that made me decide on this saw vs something bigger/nicer/more powerful.

I have the Bosch aluminum table top router table. I’m not sure if I’ll put it on the table saw or on a flip top cart with my 735 planer.

View jgt1942's profile

jgt1942

196 posts in 1703 days


#11 posted 01-27-2017 05:14 PM

My router is in a separate table as well and I plan to rework it a bit mainly to raise the height and put better wheels on it. The only issue I have with the seperate table is that it is difficult to work with long pieces but this would be true if attached to the saw. I will solve the height issue by making it the same height as my workbench (and tablesaw), which is also on wheels (e.g. the WB), and then I can use the workbench as support when needed for long things. I currently use the workbench as support for the feed side of the tablesaw.

About two years ago I replaced the router support with a Jessem router lift and now wish I had got with the computer lift but I was on a super tight budget and could not afford the extra money required.

I’m still dreaming of replacing my planer and jointer with the Hammer combo planer/joiner but the cash flow is much too tight. The DW735 is super loud and the Helix head would cost about $400 but this is a lot less than the Hammer would cost even after selling my 735 and my Rigid Joiner.

-- JohnT

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

308 posts in 791 days


#12 posted 02-01-2017 02:58 AM

any updates on the clean up?

View ihadmail's profile

ihadmail

61 posts in 328 days


#13 posted 02-01-2017 04:53 AM



any updates on the clean up?

- corelz125

I am still effectively sitting where I was at the end of part two.

I started cleaning some of the trunion parts and cannot get into all of the small crevices to my satisfaction, even with the dremel. I’m going to have to go with plan B and use POR-15.

I’m waiting on some replacement parts from Dewalt. The available parts for this thing are scarce. I’m also waiting on my POR-15 order to arrive.

I picked up some Sherwin Williams Pro-Industrial DTM semi gloss black to coat over the POR-15.

I’ll make a part 3 once I’ve made enough progress to justify it.

View jgt1942's profile

jgt1942

196 posts in 1703 days


#14 posted 02-01-2017 07:27 AM

You might also try Evo-rust, I’ve had great success with it. Also look at YouTube, a few years ago I saw where some guys used a homemade mixture to remove rust from auto body parts and the cost was very inexpensive whereas Evo-rust can get expensive especially if you have large parts.

-- JohnT

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

308 posts in 791 days


#15 posted 02-01-2017 10:18 PM

which por-15 product are you using? I only used a clear coat from them.

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