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Tool gloat: UNISAW! #6: Mending fences

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Blog entry by ic3ss posted 04-19-2011 10:16 AM 3607 reads 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Mobile base, cable holder, and more fence work. Part 6 of Tool gloat: UNISAW! series Part 7: Rail and fence adjustment »

Over the last few blog entries, I’ve included pictures of my fence and rails sitting outside drying fresh coat of black paint. This fence that came with the saw is someone’s shop build of a T-Square fence. It was in rough shape on the surface, but looks like it’s in pretty good shape and could benefit from a couple of tune-up items. The angle iron rides directly on the guide tube, metal on metal, lacking the smooth movement that something like a Biesemeyer fence has. See, the Biesemeyer has these plastic pads mounted under the angle iron in four points allowing a low friction movement. Today my Biesemeyer glide pads arrived early, so I was able to mount the four pads. Each glide pad is made with two posts sticking out the back face, to go into holes in the metal and that’s how it’s mounted.

My task is to drill two holes per glide pad, using a #15 drill bit. I had to make a quick run to the hardware store to get the bit. For those of you who don’t have a numbered drill bit set, the #15 bit is 0.180” or 4.572 mm and the size of the glide pad post is 0.186”. You could get by with using an 11/64” bit and ream it out a bit, but I only payed $1 for the correct bit. The plastic post is just oversized enough to provide a tight fit.

The glide pad posts are spaced at EXACTLY 1” apart. Out of eight holes I drilled, I ended up with one that was spaced slightly too far from it’s mate and I had to ream it with a small round file. All of these pads were hard to get in. I had to cover the pad with paper to protect the pad, then use channel lock pliers to seat the posts. I was very careful to have the jaws directly over the post to avoid deforming the pad.

I got the two that bear the weight of the fence mounted, and the one I had to ream the hole on ended up being crooked. Oh well. Now for the inside pads.

I had already drilled and mounted the two pads for the inside surface, so now I tap the hole for the set screws that will allow me to adjust the fence parallel to the saw blade.

I also mounted the front rail to the table, and I got to use my new drill press to drill the holes. The rail is long enough to support an old extension table that I didn’t want when I bought the saw, so I mounted the rail further to the left shortening the overhang on the right side and allowing fence usage on the left side of the blade. Tomorrow, I’ll mount the back rail and front guide tube. Then I have to work out a pending snag. The fence used to be operated without the plastic glide pads, now that I’ve added them to the side of the clamping surface, the pads take up space, and now the fence barely fits down on the guide tube only with the alignment adjusting set screws backed all the way out. I’m not sure exactly how I’m going to accomodate the extra space required by the pads, but I have a few ideas I’ll try.

I’d love to hear any suggestions.

-Wayne

-- "I am endeavoring, ma'am, to construct a mnemonic memory circuit using stone knives and bear skins."



9 comments so far

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13342 posts in 2359 days


#1 posted 04-19-2011 03:07 PM

Looks good!

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View emetric's profile

emetric

134 posts in 1855 days


#2 posted 04-19-2011 04:16 PM

try using a larger angle iron to increase the space between the tube and angle. I made my own rails for a delta t-2 (which is very similar to a biesmeyer), and using larger angle iron helped me out.

Click for details

-- "One often meets his destiny on the road he takes to avoid it." Master Oogway

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

15082 posts in 1875 days


#3 posted 04-19-2011 04:34 PM

Well done, Looking good!

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View ic3ss's profile

ic3ss

260 posts in 1463 days


#4 posted 04-19-2011 06:52 PM

emetric,

The gap between the angle iron and the guide tube is ok as I can see at this point. It’s the thickness of the guide tube itself that’s the problem. It’s now too wide to fit between the fence angle iron with pads and the clamping foot at the handle. Here I’m holding the guide tube in the fence clamp while the fence is upside down on the table. I backed out the adjustment set screws all the way and it made just enough room to slide the guide tube in with the clamp handle all the way unclamped. With that, the fence clamp will be too tight to move the fence, and therefore the clamp handle won’t have much movement.

I noticed there’s paint on the clamping cam and the foot. I’ll try to clean that off. Then I’ll grind a little off the back of the foot where it contacts the cam. I only need about another 1/16”.

-Wayne

I’m thinking of maybe sanding down the clamping foot about 1/16”. Or a more blunt approach would be to hammer the clamp mount to bend it out a little, but I risk screwing something up.

-- "I am endeavoring, ma'am, to construct a mnemonic memory circuit using stone knives and bear skins."

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6663 posts in 2666 days


#5 posted 04-19-2011 07:20 PM

Hi Wayne;

I’ve enjoyed reading about your Unisaw restoration project.

A very big plus in doing it as you have is you will be VERY familiar with how everything works, and how to make any adjustments the saw may need.

These old unisaws are worth the effort, no doubt about that.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View ic3ss's profile

ic3ss

260 posts in 1463 days


#6 posted 04-20-2011 03:02 AM

Lee-

I couldn’t agree more. This Unisaw was made in 1983, and is way more than I really need but it’s nice to have something like this that’s overbuilt. That way you’re not working it so hard and it’ll last longer. Plus the extra weight keeps the vibrations at a minimum.

I think I need to do a nickel test and see how it does. I’ll have to think about that.

-Wayne

-- "I am endeavoring, ma'am, to construct a mnemonic memory circuit using stone knives and bear skins."

View emetric's profile

emetric

134 posts in 1855 days


#7 posted 04-20-2011 12:46 PM

Sorry about that, I guess I misunderstood what you were saying originally. Anyway, the self adhesive uhmw slick tape might be thinner and just might give you the additional clearance that you need. You can get it at woodcraft for around $10. Sanding the pads down might not work because it might make the the connections of the post to the pad weaker. Just a thought.

-- "One often meets his destiny on the road he takes to avoid it." Master Oogway

View ic3ss's profile

ic3ss

260 posts in 1463 days


#8 posted 04-20-2011 02:05 PM

I thought about the self adhesive tape but decided against it thinking that after a while it may slide off. Have you used it before? Is it reliable to stay put and handle pressure well? I actually filed down the locking cam yesterday and was able to get enough clearance to get the fence on the guide tube. Seems to work pretty well now, but I’ll keep the tape in mind. Thanks for the suggestion.

-Wayne

-- "I am endeavoring, ma'am, to construct a mnemonic memory circuit using stone knives and bear skins."

View emetric's profile

emetric

134 posts in 1855 days


#9 posted 04-20-2011 05:02 PM

no I haven’t actually used it before but I did purchase a roll for the purpose of using it to help make my t2 fence slid smoother on my home made rails. I will let you know when I actually use it. I would imagine that it would hold up pretty well, most self adhesive items that I have used lately have surprisingly strong tack even under fairly hot conditions for extended periods of time. I am glad that you were able to find a workable solution. I still need to add a measuring tape and of course slick tape to my own setup. I guess there just isn’t enough time…..

-- "One often meets his destiny on the road he takes to avoid it." Master Oogway

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