LumberJocks

Toy Construction #125: Delivery truck wheels

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by htl posted 12-02-2016 11:01 PM 1240 reads 0 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 124: Delivery truck, steps, bumper, roof Part 125 of Toy Construction series Part 126: Delivery truck More about wheels and the roof »

Played with making some wheels.
Had a couple different inserts to try, can’t say I’m to happy with them but made two sets of tires so may try again.
These are made of cherry and a touch a oak.
2 7/8 tall – 1” wide
Used vinegar & steel wool stain on them.

I must say what ever Cricket did they really speeded up the up loads WOW!!!

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.



21 comments so far

View crowie's profile

crowie

1988 posts in 1760 days


#1 posted 12-03-2016 12:07 AM

Bruce, You certainly make a very nice MODEL wheel sir….

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

3622 posts in 2076 days


#2 posted 12-03-2016 01:36 AM

Nicely made as crowie has stated.

More work than non-woodworkers ever will realize too!

-- SAWDUST is THERAPY without a couch! just rjR

View Bruce Barber's profile

Bruce Barber

94 posts in 613 days


#3 posted 12-03-2016 01:52 AM

Hey Bruce ,,,i was looking at doing my Hummer wheels like that,, but going to make them 4” x 1 3/4 how many halfs do you have in a wheel and what is the wide size 1/4’ ?? plus what colour of stain is that and the stin make

great Job ,, keep up the work

Bruce

-- Bruce, Thunder Bay , Ontario, Canada

View bj383ss's profile

bj383ss

187 posts in 2171 days


#4 posted 12-03-2016 03:04 AM

Those wheels look fantastic!

Bret

-- https://www.flickr.com/photos/27291602@N03/

View htl's profile

htl

3049 posts in 969 days


#5 posted 12-03-2016 03:51 AM

Bruce the tires are one piece of wood,
1 drill out the centers almost through using a hole saw [ this provides an axle hole, keeps everything in line]
2 band saw them round
3 sand to size on the disk sander
4 drill out the center enough so the router can
5 shape the inside edge edges, also do out side.
6 cut the cross the tire treads with the tire jig
7 cut the treads around the wheel with the table saw [all table saw cuts using dewalt 7 1/4” 36 tooth blade]

Ps I cut test boards to figure out spacing for the treads.

The stain is a wood treatment that turns the wood black.
Can’t think what you call it to save my life, maybe someone will pipe in.
Here's one
Walnut works the best but I hate to use up my walnut.
Cherry what these tires are works pretty well .
oak works but does show some wood grain.
Which ever one you use try to make them all out of the same board, some wood will get black than others.
Old growth new growth stain differently.

Seems like I made a how 2 on this.
Look here.
I hope this is what you were wanting.
If not maybe it will help some one.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2866 posts in 522 days


#6 posted 12-03-2016 04:19 AM

ebozizing ??

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1272 posts in 630 days


#7 posted 12-03-2016 06:20 AM

Feel like a parrot if I say great wheels… So SQUAWK...


Bruce the tires are one piece of wood,
1 drill out the centers almost through using a hole saw [ this provides an axle hole, keeps everything in line]
...

- htl


Sorry #4, I am confused.
If you use a hole saw as I know them,

I can understand the “axle hole” but how do you hog out the holes for the rim?
The rest certainly makes sense.


ebozizing ??

- GR8HUNTER


I have found (only in test samples) that strong black tea (compliments of PJones or preferably “tannin powder” dissolved in water/metho) brushed on first and let dry before the “ebonizer” creates a much darker black in lighter timbers like maple.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View htl's profile

htl

3049 posts in 969 days


#8 posted 12-03-2016 06:35 AM

Forstner bits to the rescue, just use one smaller than the hole saw hole and hog out the center.
I do it at this stage of the build to save a lot a hole a lining later.
The hole from the hole saw is used for the sanding disk jig, I do have to drill it out to 1/4” to work with the jigs I make.

I’ve not tried the tea but I guess I need to give it a try, a blacker black is always nice..

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2514 posts in 1978 days


#9 posted 12-03-2016 08:21 AM

Nice and ….......big wheels.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1272 posts in 630 days


#10 posted 12-03-2016 09:56 AM


Forstner bits to the rescue, just use one smaller than the hole saw hole and hog out the center.
I do it at this stage of the build to save a lot a hole a lining later.
The hole from the hole saw is used for the sanding disk jig, I do have to drill it out to 1/4” to work with the jigs I make.

- htl


Sorry for hassling #4. I guessed you did something like that and it should be obvious to all. However, giving it a step of it’s own completes the picture.
After all ”Once a time” seems lacking without the ”upon” in there somewhere.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1272 posts in 630 days


#11 posted 12-03-2016 09:59 AM


I’ve not tried the tea but I guess I need to give it a try, a blacker black is always nice..

- htl

Pjonesy put me onto black tea and somewhere I must have dreamt about ”tannin powder” (must be a dream as you know I don’t read). Tea containg some amount of tannin, however, I am guessing dedicated ”tannin powder” would have just a smidgeon more…
This was not a scientific experiment, as the samples were from different cuts of maple scraps, however, you can notice the obvious difference in the small picture below.
Top timber is basted with tannin while the bottom one had a cupa-T... b4 the vinegars scrub.

U B the judge….

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View htl's profile

htl

3049 posts in 969 days


#12 posted 12-03-2016 02:48 PM

As I’ve said before I keep refining my methods and finding faster and easier ways.
Just jiggling the steps for cutting the holes makes a big difference how easy these are to make.
I really like Dutchy’s look much better with the staggered treads but it takes a lot more work and I mean a lot, so my way is the fast and dirty way to get the look with out that much work.
They’re not staggered but I can live with that.
I’ve been thinking of doing a step by step with drill bit sizes to help some make a wheel with everything needed no guess work involved.

That is one nice looking flap wheel you got there in the last picture. Ducky

I kept wondering what the spring was for on your hole saw picture then it hit me to help push the part out, never seen one like that before course I don’t pay the big $$$ for my holes saws either. LOL

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View htl's profile

htl

3049 posts in 969 days


#13 posted 12-03-2016 03:12 PM

1a Mark some wood for tires [use a compass] this finds axle hole and where to band saw wheels
1b Drill out the centers almost through using a hole saw [ this provides an axle hole, keeps everything in line] Needs to be drilled deep enough to give the router bearing room for rounding edge later on.
1c Then take a Forstner bit smaller than the hole saw hole and hog out the center.
2 band saw them round a tad bigger than needed.
3 sand to size on the disk sander jig
4 drill out the center deep enough so the router can shape the edges.
5 shape the inside edges, also do out side. Do this now for less tread chipping later.
6 cut the cross the tire treads with the tire jig
7 cut the treads around the wheel with the table saw [all table saw cuts using dewalt 7 1/4” 36 tooth blade] The dewalt 40 and 60 tooth blades both are thinner blades for a slightly thinner kerf.
I use store bought tires for my centers they’re cheap and made from maple I think so better wood for drilling and shaping the center parts.
They stain out a little lighter so adds a little contrast but if you want all to match make your own centers.

All of this info are in my posts but spread over a couple a builds and each time tried different ways till I came up doing them in these steps.
Once you get these steps down, you can build a set a tires very quickly.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View htl's profile

htl

3049 posts in 969 days


#14 posted 12-03-2016 09:19 PM

Adding a little bit more would have loved to add it last post up but it’s now closed.
So will add it here to make it easy to copy it all or print out.

1a Mark some wood for tires [use a compass] this finds axle hole and where to band saw wheels
1b Drill out the centers almost through using a hole saw [ this provides an axle hole, keeps everything in line] Needs to be drilled deep enough to give the router bearing room for rounding edge later on.
1c Then take a Forstner bit smaller than the hole saw hole and hog out the center.
2 band saw them round a tad bigger than needed.
3 sand to size on the disk sander jig
4 drill out the center deep enough so the router can shape the edges.
5 shape the inside edges, also do out side. Do this now for less tread chipping later.
6 cut the cross the tire treads with the tire jig
7 cut the treads around the wheel with the table saw [all table saw cuts using dewalt 7 1/4” 36 tooth blade] The dewalt 40 and 60 tooth blades both are thinner blades for a slightly thinner kerf.
I use store bought tires for my centers they’re cheap and made from maple I think so better wood for drilling and shaping the center parts.
They stain out a little lighter so adds a little contrast but if you want all to match make your own centers. Note I’ve been using 1 1/2” store bought wheels but today I ran out of those so tried my hand at some 2” wheels will at new blog to show them.
The 1 1/2” wheels fit just right in one of my hole saw blades, so must be 1 1/2” inside D.
The 2” must be cut down, haven’t looked into using bigger hole saw with them would work great with the hummer tires which are really big.
All of this info are in my posts but spread over a couple a builds and each time tried different ways till I came up doing them in these steps.
Once you get these steps down, you can build a set a tires very quickly.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

28685 posts in 2676 days


#15 posted 12-03-2016 09:32 PM

These wheels look great. Nice work.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

showing 1 through 15 of 21 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com