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Toy costruction #53: Making a spoked wheel

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Blog entry by htl posted 05-19-2016 03:37 AM 1209 reads 5 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 52: 32 Lincoln Kb 2.5 Spent the day making A wheel. Part 53 of Toy costruction series Part 54: Sanding wheels then back to the car building »

Here’s a quick how to for making spoked wheels.

Please watch this video it’s where I got my ideas on how to do it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpmuusMTl-o

I just used the windows Snapping tool and copied his plan but it’s at an angle so not right.
If I was to do this again I would draw up a better pattern.

As always changes are made to suit the tools and ability.

First I cut out all the parts using my holes saw set.
My wheels are for a 2 3/4 wheel and made adjustments to his plans to work with my hole saw set.
If I was going to start making a bunch a wheels it would pay to get an adjustable hole saw cutter.
I made 8 wheels, I only needed 4 for the car and two for the spare tires.
So had two for experimenting.
The first turned out ok, by the forth I was getting it figured out.
All are usable but the last 4 are uniform and consistent.

Like the video I glued down the rings, I used super glue so no white glue will show up later.
I also used thicker paper to glue them to didn’t want the parts moving as I drilled them.
Here I’m marking for the drill holes, will be cutting off the out side bottom of the pattern.

I clamped a block so I would have something to hold the part while drilling.
I used tooth picks for spokes and used 3 different size drill bits to keep control of the wandering of the bit.
A very small bit just to get the hole started, then switched over to a little bigger and stronger bit to drill through and set the angle, then used the right size to finish it off.

I got this drill set at HF and it’s worked really great on wood doesn’t seem to wander like some bits do.

I would drill all the holes in one direction, glue in the tooth picks then drill in the other direction and glue them up.
I would drill the first set just below the center line then with the next set drill just above the tooth pick, this kept them in line.
The center line I’m talking about here is on the center or axle part.
For the drilling of the out side, drill first set of holes[one direction] glue in tooth picks for that set then drill right over the hole of the first set of glued in part. [This keeps every thing in line]

I cut off the tips of the tooth picks so all would be the same thickness.

Before I would glue in a part I would put it in and mark it to know where to put glue, the tip and just before the mark.
Note If your planing on staining your tires and rims, you better be careful where you glue the spokes or they’ll come out white where the glue seals the wood.

Step by step pictures.
The bottom left picture shows the tooth picks all pointing in one direction [first drilling]
The second shows them going in other direction [second drilling]
The third shows then up the middle [third drilling.
If you could see it, the holes in the center axle part would all be one on top of the other.
Bottom would be first drilling then the second then the last all in line with each other.

I know it’s hard to see but the rim with the tire was the first and looks alright but with the other rim the spokes are on top of each [in line] other more consistently and turned out much better.

Well that’s two 1/2 days work and still no tires, but happy with the out come so far.
Now if I can just come up with a simple tread pattern with out buggering all this work.

I know this is a lot of info but read it 10 or more times and you’ll start to get it.
I must have watch the video 10 times then took snap shots of the different points to get it in my head, but till you start playing with it that’s when it all falls into place.
That’s all folks.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.



14 comments so far

View bruce317's profile

bruce317

206 posts in 284 days


#1 posted 05-19-2016 04:08 AM

Great liking wheels. With wonderful information. Thank you!

-- Bruce - Indiana

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2012 posts in 1630 days


#2 posted 05-19-2016 05:37 AM

Also this one is put into my favorites map. Now I’m waiting for the “colering” how to ;)

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

588 posts in 282 days


#3 posted 05-19-2016 09:03 AM

Great tutorial. You should make a video and sell it to T&J. It’s certainly a method I will file away in my wheel making bag of goodies.

Oh yeh, you don’t get off that easy….

... and still no tires, ...
Just put it on the same queue as your railway TRACKS…..

I took a copy of this article for keepsake before idiotic people, like me, start making irreverent (and irrelevant) statements and finish up infecting your good work.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1944 posts in 1450 days


#4 posted 05-19-2016 10:50 AM

Very well done and excellent wheels

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#5 posted 05-19-2016 01:40 PM

Ducky it’s never ever happened to me.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#6 posted 05-19-2016 01:40 PM

Ducky it’s never ever happened to me.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#7 posted 05-19-2016 01:55 PM



Also this one is put into my favorites map. Now I m waiting for the “colering” how to ;)

- Dutchy


Now’s when I start getting nervous, I’ve got it this far now afraid I’ll bugger it up.

Don’t need to worry ain’t no white walls touching my tires.
Will be playing with some black on the two extras to see what can be done but may wait till I get the car a little farther along before committing myself to any colors[black].

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View Julian's profile

Julian

1034 posts in 2152 days


#8 posted 05-19-2016 02:44 PM

Very cool. Fantastic detail. Thanks for sharing.

-- Julian

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#9 posted 05-19-2016 02:53 PM

Thanks Julian
I like to go back and look at what projects a commenter has made and yours are out standing and you made some cool toys too!!.
I build a crane like yours but haven’t posted it for some reason, maybe because it turned out kind of ugly! LOL

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View woodworkerguyca's profile

woodworkerguyca

27 posts in 505 days


#10 posted 05-19-2016 07:31 PM

that is brilliant.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7479 posts in 1468 days


#11 posted 05-19-2016 08:17 PM

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23142 posts in 2328 days


#12 posted 05-19-2016 08:30 PM

Those spoke wheels really look sharp and your presentation is very interesting.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#13 posted 05-19-2016 09:49 PM

The video is the main tool here, I just added some things that you would have had to come up with on your own and this helps you from getting the bald spot on the back of your head that now needs to grow back out if it will.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#14 posted 05-27-2016 10:00 PM

Dutchy I’m hoping you’ed be the one on “colering” how to ;)
Pjonesy done a bunch a wheels black what does he call it? tires are ebonized
Would love if he’d give us some hints.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

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