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Toy costruction #30: Building the body and motor

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Blog entry by htl posted 03-29-2016 11:18 PM 1270 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 29: Mack axles Part 30 of Toy costruction series Part 31: More body work »

Got started on the motor and body today so here we go.
I may go back to the full diesel truck body and save this body for another project but we’ll see.
No matter here’s a how to on doweling.
The body is going to flip up so need a motor.

Started cutting out the body and then sanding the windows.
I’ve been using a file and metal straight edge to get my windows looking right.

My saw is just barely holding on, I’m surprised it got these parts cut.
That Raccoon just about killed it.

I like to use dowels to hold my projects together as I build, this keeps every thing lined up and I don’t have to glue it all up so fast can leave it loose to be able to change thing as I go along.
So here’s a step by step.

Using my Dowel Crafter jig.
I could have used my Shop Smith in horizontal drill press mod just as easy but forgot about it at the time.


Now when I get ready to glue every thing up I don’t need to worry about the parts moving while gluing and adding clamps, every thing stays put.

Here’s some body shots.

Will need to cut out the back, the motor is half way in the cabin.

That’s all folks.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.



15 comments so far

View Dale J Struhar Sr's profile

Dale J Struhar Sr

447 posts in 2592 days


#1 posted 03-29-2016 11:25 PM

Pretty awesome. Waiting for the next step.

-- Dale, Ohio

View hookfoot's profile

hookfoot

178 posts in 1411 days


#2 posted 03-29-2016 11:31 PM

Looks good.

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#3 posted 03-29-2016 11:38 PM

Dale this is hot of the press so give me a day. LOL

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

588 posts in 282 days


#4 posted 03-30-2016 12:33 AM

Hope that metal straight edge is not a ruler… If I used that technique (which by the way I like) I might as well draw my next ruled line freehand.
Also like your idea of dowels, however, I would like a very accurate depth stop.. Some of the “major parts’” thicknesses in some models are only 3/16” (nearly the length of the pilot tip). Will have to incorporate this concept in my next build but downsize to 4mm dowels.
BTW. Wheels (tires) look ”bloodi” good.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#5 posted 03-30-2016 02:28 AM

Duck the shop smith has one out standing depth stop.
The ruler is an old cork backed ruler that the prints gone, I use it for that, I’m not going out to buy when I have something in house that works just fine.
Also I don’t build by the rules I make things for me and build to my specks not theirs.
I must say I really have enjoyed using the T&J plans really takes the work out of it and makes it easier and much more fun.
I guess I’m coming from the building of wood toys so don’t have a problem with using thicker wood.

Really I’m a beginner coming in to it from a house cabinet and furniture building back ground.
I’ve thought about using some tooth pick dowels and use brad nails as the dowel guide.
Could use the tooth pick and just drill the hole on though and make them look like rivets, now wouldn’t that look cool on some parts.

Thanks Duck for the comments they made me look at why I do things the way I do, which may look crazy to others but seem to work till I can learn something better. lol

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#6 posted 03-30-2016 02:31 AM

Duck on the shopsmith you can put the drill bit where you want it set the dial to 0 tighten it up and your ready to drill to that depth, it works really sweet.
Here’s the dial but not in drill mod in the picture.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

588 posts in 282 days


#7 posted 03-30-2016 03:41 AM

I do like your approach. I strictly stick to T&J dimensions so I don’t have to adjust length for changes in thickness (just call me lazy). Just gaging about the ruler, though I use the same concept with a chisel but think rasp is less prone to mistakes (not to mention probably quicker). Ok I’ll mention it… It’s probably quicker..

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

588 posts in 282 days


#8 posted 03-30-2016 03:43 AM

Am also envious of the SS…

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#9 posted 03-30-2016 05:29 AM

It’s a shame they can’t be had over there, they are a ball to work with.
It doesn’t really matter how we ger er done just so we do. lol

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7480 posts in 1469 days


#10 posted 03-30-2016 11:31 AM

Man those tires (tyres?) came out GREAT !

I used the doweling method for lining up glue joints years ago when I built a desk (long since gone) and it really did work. I haven’t built too many larger items in quite a while. And on thinner work I’m always afraid I’ll drill thru.

Lookin’ good so far !

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View crowie's profile

crowie

1482 posts in 1412 days


#11 posted 03-30-2016 08:33 PM

Thank you Bruce for a top tutorial on the cabin; I’m especially impressed with the mini doweling…..

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#12 posted 03-31-2016 12:23 AM

I’m an old I mean old cabinet builder from way back so doweling was a way of life , you had to make the face frames strong so dowels was the way to go.
Doweling has fallen out of fashion now a days but it has worked for me for years.
Biscuits was used for a while now it’s all screws and they work great but not in this application.
Thanks all for your comments and sure love checking out you projects, I get new ideas every day.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#13 posted 03-31-2016 12:34 AM

Hookfoot I just checked out your posts and wow some really fine work there.
One of the few that I have seen that use metal and plastics, to dress up their projects.
Very nice job, Out Standing is a better word.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View rougninit's profile

rougninit

10 posts in 64 days


#14 posted 10-07-2016 01:47 AM

Do you have any drawings on the motor/transmission that you would be willing to share? I enjoy adding detail and have been trying to come up with a motor trans set up. Yours looks real good

-- Jim, living in Texas

View htl's profile

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#15 posted 10-07-2016 02:52 AM

Mine came out of a Gatto truck plan I never made the truck but the motor and rear end are very interesting.
Check out the motor in this build.

Figure out what make of truck you’re building then do a search for the motor that goes with it then search for motor pictures.
There should be tons of pictures of people rebuilding trucks and motors.
Then down load some pictures print them out to size and then draw the outlines of the motor and trans and there you go.

Or take my first picture up top and print it out to suit.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

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