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profiling (making) hard to find mouldings on a router table with core box bits.

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Blog entry by hobby1 posted 280 days ago 868 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’m doing some clientel work, tearing out an old bookcase in a well over 200 yr. old house, the person who owned it previously, put a wood plank floor in, around this bookcase in the corner of the living room, so after the bookcase came out, I had to install some oak plank flooring, along with that there is no base board either, my client tried to find matching base board, and top cap moulding, but couldn’t locate it any where locally, so he bought some pine boards and asked if I would try to match the original as close as possible.

I was going to rout seperate mouldings and then glue it up to make the final piece to match, but the more I looked at it, I began to think about a procedure that I learned on the machinists forum, where a guy would machine, and actually sculpt out metal out of a solid block, using one end mill type cutter, he would use “ball nose” end mills.

The cutters profile was a half of a circlular, with this profile all facets could be milled out, from interior concave cuts to exterior convex cuts as well as flats if needed just by doing it in increments, then when this was done he would file the rest to smooth out the whole profile.

In woodworking, there is the same type of cutter profile router bit, its the good ole “core box” bit.
My old 1980’s craftsman set of router bits came with about 3 different sizes of these bits, so that’s what I decided to use to mill out this profile for this custom moulding I needed to make.

I started to take pictures after I started to see the progress in this, I first used my straight bits to hog out as much material before the actual profile, then I started to work the profile using my largest size core box bit

here is the original

here is my router setup with dust collection

here is where i decided to take pix of this project, because I seen it was going to work good.

here is after another pass incremented from the previous in width and depth of cut.

Now I needed to hog out more material, so I used my 3/4” dia. straight bit.

then back to a core box bit, for another incremental change in depth of cut as well as fence adjustment,

after all the increments are cut with the core box bit, I also made the rabbit cut with my rabitting bit at the left side

then finally using my round over bit I finished off the left side rounding over the edge.

then cut it to final width on my table saw, and then some sand paper in hand to smooth out the mill marks.

the results, comparing with the original.


the origianl on the right

The original moulding was 7/8” thickness, my client said it was ok to use 3/4” for final width and just adjust it since it is a seperate piece in the corner of the room, because of this diffence in board thickness, the large roundover does not have a full roundover but a small flat ontop, which I sanded as much as possible to give a somewhat round look to it.

have fun in the shop…

.



7 comments so far

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 669 days


#1 posted 280 days ago

Good results, but that’s a lot of work. If you charged the client based on the #of adjustments to the router bit, you’d make a fortune.

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View hobby1's profile

hobby1

282 posts in 929 days


#2 posted 280 days ago

yeh, that is true, hee,hee,,,however we did agree upon a price for labor ahead of time, I’m getting a nice paycheck for it, due to his generosity, but I still think he’s saving a bundle, by not having to have a special cutter made, at a machine shop, and having this sourced out to a shop with a moulding machine.

What I really like, though, is that I have learned how to use my router to make some custom mouldings, without having to glue up a bunch of pieces like I used to do.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

1692 posts in 1740 days


#3 posted 280 days ago

That would have been a $400 knife set for your shaper/molder, if you had a shaper/molder…and would have been a one time (probably) use. I think your client was aware of those things when he asked you to do it. Good work, in any event.

View stefang's profile (online now)

stefang

12929 posts in 1965 days


#4 posted 280 days ago

Nicely done duplication on this. I have read several articles on routing moldings and you did it just like I have read. I saw a tip once that suggested using part of the molding as a mold, filling it with auto putty (Bondo?) and then fixing sandpaper to the finished cast to use as a sanding block.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

1644 posts in 835 days


#5 posted 280 days ago

Oh yes the mighty versatile router and a few bits works every time.

Just a matter of thinking about how to go about it first and amazing results with just a few of the bits.

If you have a shaper yes you could custom grind set of knives to do the work as long as you have the qty to justify it

-- Regards Robert

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

1644 posts in 835 days


#6 posted 280 days ago

Oh yes the mighty versatile router and a few bits works every time.

Just a matter of thinking about how to go about it first and amazing results with just a few of the bits.

If you have a shaper yes you could custom grind set of knives to do the work as long as you have the qty to justify it

-- Regards Robert

View hobby1's profile

hobby1

282 posts in 929 days


#7 posted 279 days ago

Thanks guys for the complements.
That’s a good tip about the sanding block mike.

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