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I Made a Batch of Rosettes Today

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Blog entry by helluvawreck posted 12-03-2010 04:18 PM 4595 reads 0 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Every now and then I have to make a small batch of rosettes in the machine shop. I normally don’t do this on this Bridgeport because I don’t want the dust to get on the mill. However, I did today because I had to do a little work on the small mill. We have a couple of other machines to do these in bigger quantities but this is just as good a way as any to do them in quantities of 50 -100 pcs.

The other reason that I prefer to do this on the smaller mill is because the highest speed on the Bridgeport is around 2700 RPM where as the smaller mill made by grizzly has a top speed of 5000 RPM.

We use a head made by Charles G G Schmidt that has a max RPM limit of 7500 RPM. We grind and sharpen the knives in our grinding room. However, the one thing that I insist on doing myself is to put the knives in the head myself to make sure they are inserted properly and that the retaining screws are tight. This is for an obvious reason. The centrifugal force is relatively large and if one of these knives comes loose the force will throw the knife out at a speed that is high enough to go through a man’s body.

Everything so far has worked out fine but that is because I always try to be careful. Someone was killed by one of these heads in a small shop a while back because someone foolishly put one of these heads in an overhead router at 20 or 30 thousand RPM. One of the knives flew out and went straight thru the mans heart and out his back and he was killed instantly. The reason that MAX RPM is stamped on a cutter head is so that people will not be killed or injured. Please, folks, don’t foolishly neglect things like this. The laws of physics are real and the warning notice is there for a reason.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau



21 comments so far

View GaryL's profile

GaryL

1080 posts in 1574 days


#1 posted 12-03-2010 04:28 PM

I have thought about getting some rosette cutters so I could add some additional elements into mantles, shelving, etc. I would like to be able to cut a rosette into larger pieces, rather than just applying a factory made piece. Are the Charles G G Schmidt heads good quality but without breaking the bank? What RPM do you recommend?

Edit: Just went to the Schmidt site. May be a little overkill for my occasional use. Seems to be more suited for your production work.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

View gul's profile

gul

400 posts in 1706 days


#2 posted 12-03-2010 04:28 PM

They look great.I love rossetts.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

16033 posts in 1610 days


#3 posted 12-03-2010 04:40 PM

Gary, they are the best that I have found and we have tried three kinds. Schmidt can grind and sharpen the knives for you. I think that is better to use a milling machine but a decent drill press will work but I would check with Schmidt about what RPM to run them on when using a regular drill press. You can do it but you might have to cut the RPM down because the spindle on a mill is a much better spindle than what is normally found on a drill press. Also, on a mill you have a tool holder that is a little heavier than a Morse taper or straight holder. People do these on drill presses all the time so you should certainly give it a try and I don’t think you will run into any problems so long as you get your advice from Schmidt. I believe, from memory, that the price of the head is $200 – $300 but I could be wrong.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

16033 posts in 1610 days


#4 posted 12-03-2010 04:41 PM

Thanks, Gul, I love them also. :)

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2417 days


#5 posted 12-03-2010 05:21 PM

Nice looking rosettes.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1593 posts in 2035 days


#6 posted 12-03-2010 05:37 PM

This reminds me of my own “mill destruction” story. I took a class for my engineering degree called “Manufacturing Processes” – a glorified, University-level shop class. We made a C-clamp by casting the C in the foundry and machining the screw on the lathe. The last step was to program the CNC mill to carve our initials into the side of the C with a little ball-end bit. For testing, we would chuck felt-tip pens into the mill and write the initials on paper. Now, a pen seems pretty stiff when you hold it in your hands and try to push the ends together, but when you’ve got the “Z” travel on the mill wrong and that bed comes up too far, it crumples that pen like it’s not even there.

-- "Sometimes even now, when I'm feeling lonely and beat, I drift back in time, and I find my feet...Down on Main Street." - Bob Seger

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2953 posts in 1829 days


#7 posted 12-03-2010 05:40 PM

Nice looking rosettes and real good advice, too many times we only read the instructions and warnings
after the fact, “because it can not be that complicated”. Even the simplest of projects can get away from
you, when you do not pay attention to the details. And I always thought the Bridgeport was only good
for metal, one more possible tool to look at adding to the shop, if I can find one in the bargain basement.
Thank you for another peek into dungeon’s workshop or whatever you call it.

-- As ever, Gus-the 76 yr young apprentice carpenter

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

16033 posts in 1610 days


#8 posted 12-03-2010 05:55 PM

JJ, I can imagine what you’re saying. I like the story that I heard about a machinist that was boring a hole with an engine lathe in the machine shop of a large company. You know the way that a group of lathes are lined up in a large shop. Well, naturally you have the lathe on auto feed when you’re boring something with a boring bar. Obviously, you don’t ever leave an engine lathe or mill in the automatic feed mode unattended but as you know some fools do. Well, this one guy has to go to the bath room and tells his buddy over at the next lathe behind him to keep and eye on his lathe while he goes to the bathroom. The other guy just nodded with a smile but was already in dream world while watching his own lathe boring another part so not sure whether he heard or understood; apparently he didn’t. So naturally when the other guy gets back from the bathroom the boring bar had been boring into the spindle of the lathe for a few minutes already and the other guy never noticed. I’m not sure what all the damage was but from the story I was told it was quite a lot. They said when the shop foreman came over to see that steam started coming out of his ears, his eyes turned red, and his ire was a wonder to behold. :)

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View mafe's profile

mafe

9668 posts in 1833 days


#9 posted 12-03-2010 06:40 PM

Really nice.
I did not know that cutter.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1859 days


#10 posted 12-03-2010 07:11 PM

well I surpose carving with a knife couldĀ“t ceep up with the speed you needed them …LOL

take care
Dennis

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1582 days


#11 posted 12-04-2010 03:02 AM

Nice rosettes Charles. I didn’t realize you made so many of those. How long does it take to make a pile of those puppies? Glad you didn’t pierce your heart out today. :)

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15058 posts in 2419 days


#12 posted 12-04-2010 09:09 AM

I agree totally with rivergirl! nice rosettes and glad you didn’t pierce any hearts!! :-))

I have a little mill destruction story. I walked away from a trouble shooting job because they had another fellow there who was going to blow up a 250 hp DC motor. 2 days later the shop foreman called me to say he blew it up! I asked if it came a part? He said no, just smoked it. When they got it back, I went to the superintendent and told him they would blow it again because the problem was not fixed. A couple days later, they smoked it a second time. Convinced I knew what I was talking about, that problem was eventually resolved.

A few yrs later, they had hired a maintenance electrician. They called occasionally for me to help him out when he got stuck. One day I was there to unstuck him. He reached up and pushed the field failure relay in to start that 250 hp DC motor! I instinctively reached up to knock his had away! I told him to never do that because those DC motors running without a field and no load can reach infinite speeds. Most mechanical devices will not withstand infinite speeds. The armature on that motor probably weighs 200 pounds. There is nothing near it that will tolerate it traveling at any speed through the air or the shrapnel created when it left the motor housing ;-(

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15058 posts in 2419 days


#13 posted 12-04-2010 09:18 AM

I just had a spooky thought; BP in the Gulf was the result of clowns like the ones we are talking about on a grandiose scale :-(

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1582 days


#14 posted 12-04-2010 09:20 AM

Topo- Wow- That is a scary thought and very true though I’m sure…

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15058 posts in 2419 days


#15 posted 12-04-2010 10:30 AM

Not many of us left that know anyting about DC motors. With vairable frequency drives there will be less need for them. A lot of the older smaller tools like hellofa posted could have them if they need fine speed control. Lots of the operators probalby don’t know they are sitting on top of or near a time bomb:-( Fortunatley, most of the them have good safety systems built in.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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