LumberJocks

Poor Man's Tools #1: The Series

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by handsawgeek posted 02-17-2015 05:38 PM 1562 reads 1 time favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Poor Man's Tools series Part 2: Center Finder »

A couple of posts back, I wrote about a simple shop-made honing jig that I use regularly in my woodworking tool sharpening operation.

Being elated at seeing more than 10…yes ten!!! responses to that post from the LJs readership, I was inspired to entertain the idea of creating an on-going blog series covering similar tools and accessories cobbled together from the scrap wood bins, random parts bins and ‘Hudnut’ boxes of the handsawgeek world.

Since my workshop operates on a really tight budget, all of the items to be presented here are ones that I will have actually made and used because I have not committed the funds necessary to go out and purchase the commercially available version.

Most of the items to be offered here will definitely not be precision, state of the art devices. Some of them will likely be down-right gnarly and ugly, fashioned from gnarly and ugly materials. All of them, however, will be something that I have found to be somewhat useful in my own shop. They may or may not work for yours….

To start off, here are pics and links to some of my earlier posts covering widgets that definitely fit in this category.

Hudnut Sorter
Keep that hardware and them small parts under control.

http://lumberjocks.com/handsawgeek/blog/41990

45 Degree Rip Jig
For hand sawing a 45 rip cut on a long board

http://lumberjocks.com/handsawgeek/blog/41998

Simple Vise Mounted Planing Stop
An old reliable benchtop accessory

http://lumberjocks.com/handsawgeek/blog/44417

Hope you will follow along, and thanks for reading!

-- Ed



3 comments so far

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 827 days


#1 posted 02-17-2015 06:20 PM

Get down-right gnarly and ugly. The gnarlier and uglier the better, if it accomplishes the task set for the tool or jig, as cheaply and simply as possible. You are the man. Remember that!

Now, for my unsolicited take on these glorious three:

Hudnut Sorter
This is way too neat and well made, Ed. Pretty close to being a nice piece of furniture. ;)

I have plastic containers of various sizes filled with nuts, bolts and screws…of various sizes. The contents either lie dormant, never diminishing in volume, or they propagate like metal roaches. I can see adding handle slots on the wide sides and using this to sift, sort and dispense like minutiae into…more plastic containers! Yes, simple mind. :)

45 Degree Rip Jig
I couldn’t figure out how the jigs worked until I saw the original post. Very interesting. To keep the jigs from being sacrificial, I take it you slide the boards on them. As long as you use opposing sections for your cleats, it wouldn’t matter being off plus or minus on the 45 degrees. Ingenious. I was wondering if the weight of those long boards was causing any tipping while sawing?

Simple Vise Mounted Planing Stop

It’s a shame the shadowing in the picture doesn’t show the details below the top plane. I would like to see that detail to get a better understanding how this is used as a stop.

Keep the coming, Ed. Thanks.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 863 days


#2 posted 02-17-2015 08:22 PM

Hi, Paul,
The footprint of the sawbench is wide enough so that it doesn’t tip with everything rigged up. During sawing, one knee rests on the top of the bench as it would in regular rip sawing. And you are correct that the stock gets constantly re-located as the cut progresses.

As for the plane stop, here is a re-do of the pic that I re-adjusted for brightness and contrast. The 2×4 piece clamps into a bench face vise and the board being planed thrusts against the edge of the plywood.. Simple shtuff!

-- Ed

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 827 days


#3 posted 02-17-2015 08:30 PM


The footprint of the sawbench is wide enough so that it doesn’t tip with everything rigged up. During sawing, one knee rests on the top of the bench as it would in regular rip sawing. And you are correct that the stock gets constantly re-located as the cut progresses.

I see. Both the knee up and width of the sawhorses are enough to keep the whole affair stable.


As for the plane stop, here is a re-do of the pic that I re-adjusted for brightness and contrast. The 2×4 piece clamps into a bench face vise and the board being planed thrusts against the edge of the plywood.. Simple shtuff!


I thought that what was it looked like. It took your brief explanation to get my mind thinking in the correct direction. I was looking as the top of the stop and wondering how you held the board to be planed from slipping. I didn’t see the obvious, that the edge would be used on the bench as a stop. Sometimes when things are too simple they go over my head. Now nuclear subs: their easy. ;)

Thanks, Ed.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com