LumberJocks

Intarsia , an easier way #1: I use all the same piece of wood instead of lots of different types of wood.

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Blog entry by halfacre posted 12-02-2016 06:20 PM 2013 reads 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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These pictures are in my pictures under halfacre if these don’t open. The pictures I used for these intarsia thingies are all from wifes stained glass patterns. They can be found on google somewhere. Before you put the pattern on the wood. First apply clear packing tape to the wood. Then spray the packing tape with spray glue, maybe called temporary spray adhesive, hobby lobby, Walmart, then apply the pattern on to the glue. Then after all the pieces are cut out the tape and pattern will come off leaving the wood clean and ready for shaping….. My wife got this rapid resizer app for her stained glass business so I can resize any thing to suit my needs. Home printers are getting more reasonable so a printer that will enlarge or reduce is really helpful when making things of wood…

A scroll saw with a really thin blade is best to cut out pictures for it doesn’t leave a big gap between pieces. And for sure leave a box around the outside when cutting out the pieces. Then attach a 1/8” piece of baltic birch plywood underneath the box then as you are grinding away the edges of the pieces you will have a place to reconstruct the picture. The picture of the red birds was harder to take much gap out between the pieces so the real thin blade was a big help. These metal cutting Olson brand of blades I use has 48 teeth per inch so they will pull in two if too much tension is applied to the blade. On a Dewalt scrollsaw I only go up to # 3 and no more. Regular saw blades I set the machine on 5 or 6. I like to start with about a one inch thick piece of wood . Using a pattern with lots of pieces it is best to make two pictures or patterns, one to attach to the wood and the other to remind you where the small pieces fit back into the puzzle. The biggest problem will be gluing the pieces back together before the glue sets up. I usually number the bottoms and practice practice before starting the glue. One of the pictures shows the pieces on a board applying clear lacquer. A very small amount of glue will keep the pieces from falling off while being sprayed. Just don’t over do the glue. And then let the glue set up before continuing. And to be ahead of the game, go ahead and make 5 or 6 patterns for later cause some one will want one if you do a good job on the first one. It is not necessary to be an expert on the scrollsaw for the edges will be ground away so mistakes won’t show in the end. The clown was cut out of baltic birch plywood two 1/2” pieces glued together for the right thickness. After you get all the pieces cut out with the scrollsaw, now start grinding and contouring the pieces. The more slope on the edges the better it will look later. The only hard labor is sanding the wood smooth when finished contouring and shaping the pieces. On some intarsia pictures I might choose to use water colors and nothing else. Water colors like you used when you were a kid in school. A garage sale is the best place to find water color sets really cheap. Water colors are not as bright as printers ink and also good to use both when needed. Being water soluable just be sure the water has dried before spraying lacquer. And you do need to use 0000 steel wool or very fine sandpaper to knock down the fuzzies before spraying. And if a number of coats are applied rub the pieces down between each coat for a really smooth finish. I do use maple or ash wood and don’t use popular but it might help to learn cause it is softer and easier to work with but it will also dent or scratch easier…. After I get the pieces shaped to suit and the colors applied I then take the pieces to the bandsaw that needs to be thinned down. I start with all pieces being 1” tall then I saw off some of the back sides anywhere from 1/4 to 1/2” depending if the picture needs that much. You do need to set the bandsaw where it will cut straight and be careful pushing the small item through the blade using the fence. I use some long push sticks to keep my fingers well away from the blade. Don’t get your finger or the pieces of wood caught if the blade. Either one will cause a shut down and tears might flow. I’m 81 and have never lost any blood in my wood shop. I don’t use blade guards but I do go through carefully preparing myself for the task before me….
The lion was the best to take out all the saw blade gaps because the small pieces went all the way to the box edges. I was able to insert 1/8” strips on two side of the pieces to squeeze out all the gaps made by the thin saw blade. You might be able to see the strips.
I was able to push two strip of 1/8”baltic birch plywood along two edges next to the red box. I don’t use anything but a Dremel with a flexible shaft and good bits, not dremel bits. the bits come from Wood carvers supply, either carbide or diamond bits. 1/8” shaft bits are the best size. 1/4” are too big for intarsia. Never done a blog before so if I’m not clear or want my reasoning on things no clear, let me know.

-- halfacre, Breckenridge, Tx



7 comments so far

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

28738 posts in 2679 days


#1 posted 12-02-2016 06:36 PM

Wow! These are wonderful pieces of work.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View ZAGREB's profile

ZAGREB

766 posts in 1463 days


#2 posted 12-02-2016 09:05 PM

thank you with all my heart,I understand completly and for sure I”ll try to make something like you.I like your clown and if your wife give a permit ,I would like you send me on my mail the patern.
Thank you in advance
Greetings from Croatia,
Marijan

-- bambi

View halfacre's profile

halfacre

147 posts in 2422 days


#3 posted 12-02-2016 11:18 PM

this is what I started with. The size was too small so I enlarged it so ended up 14” tall by 10 inches wide. You can use any colors or you could use the colors I used.

-- halfacre, Breckenridge, Tx

View halfacre's profile

halfacre

147 posts in 2422 days


#4 posted 12-02-2016 11:20 PM

Can you take this picture and put it in your files then enlarge it .?

-- halfacre, Breckenridge, Tx

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2851 posts in 1801 days


#5 posted 12-02-2016 11:34 PM

What you are doing is more properly called segmentation and not Intarsia.

Intarsia uses different woods to get various colors and texture. There are many who believe that true Intarsia does not use coloring agents to achieve a picture. This is based upon what I have learned from prominent Intarsia artists such as Judy Gale Roberts and Kathy Wise. Using different woods and getting them to fit is part of the fun and difficulty of Intarsia.

Your segmentation is very nice.

View halfacre's profile

halfacre

147 posts in 2422 days


#6 posted 12-03-2016 03:08 PM

Redoad49 while I do claim what I am doing is a form of intarsia I will say I am not knitting and also I am not using wood inlays but neither are the girls you mentioned. I will say I am having just as much fun doing what I am doing as the next person but I can’t attest to the people you mentioned. I always choose to please myself in my woodworking what ever style one chooses to call it. I decided long ago there was no use in using the exotic expensive woods of the world for I found no one around me could identify any of it no how.

-- halfacre, Breckenridge, Tx

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2851 posts in 1801 days


#7 posted 12-03-2016 04:52 PM

The two people who I mentioned are doing Intarsia with various woods both domestic and exotic. There are many people who can identify the different exotic woods. I use both domestic and exotics in my Intarsia.

Here are some of Kathy Wise’s Intarsia work.

Here is some of Judy Gale Roberts work.

And here is my Intarsia of a Great Horned Owl using quite a few different woods including ebony, yellowheart, wenge, walnut,sycamore and quite a few others.

I guess these are not knitting either but they are Intarsia.

My goal is not to upset anyone but to simply clarify the difference between Intarsia and Segmentation.

The segmentation that you have made are very good and nice pieces of art.

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